Heat Pump wiring 5 wires on thermostat 4 wires on heat pump

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  #41  
Old 10-26-20, 08:34 PM
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No that would not work. You’d still be doubling transformers.
We went through this earlier. The defrost board is closing relays from the R terminal and sending voltage back to the air handler and thermostat inside.
 
  #42  
Old 10-26-20, 08:50 PM
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OK wasn't thinking about where W voltage was returning from.
 
  #43  
Old 10-26-20, 08:51 PM
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You’ll need a new thermostat bundle. Or communicating equipment.
 
  #44  
Old 10-27-20, 10:47 AM
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What's a thermostat bundle?
 
  #45  
Old 10-27-20, 11:35 AM
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The thermostat wire. It’s often called the bundle or multi conductor as it’s more then one wire.
 
  #46  
Old 10-29-20, 01:42 PM
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Finally got and answer and they said ecobee 4 to 5 will give me 5 wires at my heat pump.

R-24V Hot
C-24V Common for all components
O-Reversing valve
W-Auxiliary heat
Y-Compressor

You should ensure your the air handler power is shut off for this step. We are missing a (G) wire for your installation. Therefore, we are going to take away your (C) wire and repurpose it as a (G) wire on the thermostat side, and the air handler side. This means you will disconnect it from the C terminal, and connect it to the g terminal.

Now, I understand this will still leave you with 4 wires. This is not a problem! We will attach your 4 remaining wires to the PEK, and it will translate them into 5 wires like magic. Then we can attach it to your air handler and the installation will be complete.

If you would like me to assist you while you make these adjustments I am happy to schedule a time to call you back that works for us both today. I will be available until 5pm (EDT) - so for the next 4.5 hours.

Regards,
Brittany Pearson
ecobee support
 
  #47  
Old 10-29-20, 02:19 PM
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That device is for people that don’t have a C wire between the air handler and thermostat. They are reusing the G as a C. You don’t have a G wire between the outdoor unit and air handler.
 
  #48  
Old 10-29-20, 03:06 PM
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I've had good experience with the Ecobee support but I am not so sure what they are talking about in the email. The wire extender device, as mentioned, is for creating a "c" wire for people who do not have one. My understanding is it functions by allowing constant power across "R" and "W". Normally, the R-W circuit is open until there is a call for heat. Once there is a call, it closes and power flows back to the control board. Nest thermostats use that closed "R-W" circuit to charge an internal battery; a move that often wreaks havoc on hvac controls and often doesn't work correctly. The exact reason why a C wire is critical, as it allows constant power to the stat independent of R-W. The ecobee extender you show allows the R-W circuit to stay closed to provide constant power, but only allows that closed signal back to the control board when your stat actually calls for heat or ac. I can't think of a way the extender would work in your case.

I hate to say it but I agree, your best bet is to pull new stat cable. It may be worth relocating the thermostat to a location that's easier to pull wire to but is still central in the heating zone. Or, with an ecobee (if that is what you have), relocate the thermostat wherever and then use the sensors to give temp/humidity feedback to the stat. Thats what I would do. Even if the stat is in an inconvenient place (like a closet) you can always just use your phone to adjust 90% of the settings.


UPDATE: I could be wrong about the extender being R-W; it is more likely R-G as mentioned above. regardless, function is the same.
 
  #49  
Old 10-29-20, 04:32 PM
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Thermostat isn't the problem I only have 4 wires from handler to hp. And near impossible to pull new wire. I have wrote Ecobee back with your comments to see what they say.
 
  #50  
Old 10-29-20, 09:26 PM
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Ah i missed that regarding the wire from handler to hp (not tstat). apologies.

Regarding the wire extender kit, as you probably know, they are designed for common wires at the tstat. I am not sure how the extenders do the switching (like I described above) but lets see what Ecobee says about my post. If the switching ability of the extender is tide to a function of the ecobee stat itself, then it wont work. If its some other internal mechanism in the extender then maybe it could? No sure the heat pump can handle that set up anyways.
 
  #51  
Old 10-30-20, 03:46 PM
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They said it wouldn't work for heat pump side.
 
  #52  
Old 10-30-20, 03:53 PM
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So here is what I'm going todo. I'm going to use my ground wire disconnect it from everything. I will make sure its not touching anything. Disconnect in fuse box tie together. I have a 110v socket next to handler and hp. I will ground them both back to 110v socket. What do you think?
 
  #53  
Old 10-30-20, 04:10 PM
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To use for thermostat wire?
That’s illegal, not to code at all.
 
  #54  
Old 10-30-20, 04:47 PM
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Ok I know it wasn't code. That was just thought. What about using the copper line from air handler to hp. Running ground to that and handler. Them from that line to hp. If you had to do one or other for ground which one would be best? I know its not code.
 
  #55  
Old 10-30-20, 05:14 PM
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No, that’s not an option either.
 
  #56  
Old 10-30-20, 06:25 PM
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Why would the copper line not be good to carry the ground?
 
  #57  
Old 10-30-20, 06:42 PM
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You cannot logically use a refrigerant pipe to carry a safety grounding wire for an electrical load. It is not safe, and not smart.
Besides not being anywhere near code, it may not be able to carry the rated load to protect the device.
Also, low voltage wiring is not permitted to share conduit with high voltage wiring.
You are aware that installing your heat pump may require permitting and inspection, right?
 
 

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