New vanity

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Old 03-13-06, 09:02 AM
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Question New vanity

Hi all,

I am going to be putting in a new 30" bathroom vanity and had a few questions.

1. The water cut-off valves for the sink are about 4-6 inches from the faucet. It is ok to have bends in the connecting tubes, or does it have to be a straight shot? Right now I have polybutyl connecting tubes that I will replace with metal ones.

2. What specifically do I use (caulking, putty, sealant, etc.) to seal the connections between the new faucet and the new connectors? What about between the new drain from the sink (forgot what it's called) and the trap?

3. The cut-off valves are hard to shut all the way. I have them off now, but it wasn't easy. Is this a major problem? I mean, I won't be turning it off anytime in the near future after the vanity is in, but I though that it might indicate a bigger problem.

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-13-06, 09:20 AM
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1) Use the stainless braided tubes for your supply connections. They can be installed with soft curves in them. Just don't kink them.
2) The water supply connections should be the size and type (compression, screwed etc) as what the valve is. The end that connects to the faucet should have a rubber washer in it. Neither should need any pipe dope unless it is screwed which is unlikely. The tailpiece that comes down from the sink has fine threads where it attaches into the sink drain. Be careful not to cross-thread it. Use a couple wraps of teflon tape on the threads. The rest of the piping should have slip-nut joints.
3) The shut-off valves probably have calcium deposits in them. This makes seating the valves hard. If feasable, I would change the valves while you are working in that area. They will only be a problem if they start leaking. Sounds dumb but thats the way it is.
Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 03-14-06, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by majakdragon
3) The shut-off valves probably have calcium deposits in them. This makes seating the valves hard. If feasable, I would change the valves while you are working in that area. They will only be a problem if they start leaking. Sounds dumb but thats the way it is.
Good luck with your project.
Thanks for the help. To replace these knobs, I know I obviously have to turn off the water to the house. But do these just screw on? I tried to see how they attach, and it appears that there are threads... is this correct?

Also, you mentioned tape. Does it do on the thread and I screw the other part over it, or does it go around the outside?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 03-14-06, 11:53 AM
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If they are threaded on, you can usually see a couple threads sticking out the back of the valve. You wrap the tape on the threads and then screw the valve on to them. Wrap tape in a clockwise direction. If the valves are soldered on, you should see a silver/grey color at the back side of the valve on the pipe at the valve connection. One other type of valve is compression. With these, there is a nut that screws onto the valve and a compression ring inside the nut that makes the seal. If you have this type, you may want to remove the valve and soak it in vinegar for a couple hours. Vinegar pretty much disolves deposits. It would be taking a chance to try to match the valve with a new one and if it were a different style, the ring would have to be removed which is a real pain since it crimps into the pipe.
 
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Old 03-19-06, 08:53 PM
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Question One more thing...

Hi again,

I replaced the vanity and everything - but I have one last problem. The plastic drain pipe from the sink can't reach the trap.

Do I get a plastic or metal extension. My trap and other pipes are metal.

Thanks!

Everything else went smoothly!
 
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Old 03-20-06, 04:25 AM
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For looks, I would go with metal. Nice to keep it all the same material.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 09:24 AM
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Talking

Thanks again. This was my first experience with plumbing and I had no clue how to proceed. I appreciate your help!
 
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