Faucet water pressure drops after flush


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Old 07-11-07, 10:31 PM
K
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Faucet water pressure drops after flush

Thanks, in advance, for your patience on this one.

After the toilet flushes (works fine, thankfully), the water pressure in the sink faucet drops dramatically--and doesn't really recover for a few minutes. Even better, the sink drain slows down, too.

The rest of the time the faucet & drain work normally.

Anyone have any bright ideas about what I should be checking out here?

Thanks,
Kala


(1940's house, mostly original plumbing as far as I can tell. Main floor.)
 
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Old 07-12-07, 04:14 AM
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Kala: you may have galvanized iron piping in the house, which was prevalent in the 1940's, and it has probably calcified, rusted, deposited it's diameter from the original 1/2" to less than 3/8" by now. Also, having the same size piping throughout the house will cause a decrease in flow when a toilet is flushed. Normally from the PRV you will come off with a 3/4" cpvc or copper and make a "home run" with it, taking off at each fixture (sink, toilet, etc.) with 1/2". This keeps a full flow running in the home run with minimal flow change when another fixture is used. Replacing the original galvanized pipes is usually the only remedy, and will be absolutely necessary as soon as the pipes rust through, so get ready.
 
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Old 07-12-07, 10:52 AM
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Prv

Aaack. . . I was afraid the answer might be something like that. It looks like our the plumbing upstairs is newer but something tells me what's on the main floor wasn't updated. (Been meaning to take down that beadboard and see what's back there anyway. . . will return to share the discovery.)

What's PRV?

Thanks!!
 
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Old 07-12-07, 04:29 PM
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I might add that SOMEtimes you can get lucky and find that the pipe was picked on like in one galvanized elbow and affecting everything downstream. You have to work your way back, testing faucets-toilets-spigots-water heater drain valve, that get closer and closer to the main entry into the house to see if you can decipher this; if it all is really bad or if it is like at one spot causing this.
 
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Old 07-13-07, 04:42 AM
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Sorry, PRV is a pressure regulating valve. It will be located right where the water enters your house, and will probably look like a large disk with a screw in the middle with a little brass tag hanging off of it. Here, I am assuming you are on municipal water, and not on a well.
Trial and error may be one method, but could take a lifetime to determine the problem one joint at a time, when a total change out will solve the problem and it, hopefully, will last a long time, whereas the galvanized iron may keep deteriorating until you have a failure. Water failures aren't pretty.
 
 

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