Making a tub?


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Old 07-28-07, 04:39 PM
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Cool Making a tub?

I have a very small 2nd bathroom, and my wife wants a tub in it for my grandson. I have an old oval galvanized washtub, and was wondering if it can be converted into a regular bathub by installing a drain in it and mounting it on some type of base or pedestal. Is this doable? Is it feasible? Has anyone heard of this being done? Any information would be appreciated.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 05:20 PM
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Welcome to the forums! It can and has been done. The bath I saw had an overflow and drain set up next to a wall so they weren't seen, but it was sitting flat on the floor. I think if you try to elevate it, the bottom won't hold the weight of the water much less a body. In addition, the walls were corrugated galvanized steel panels, the sink was a feed bucket set slightly into a custom countertop with bar sink controls on the countertop. The floor was old newspaper ads imbedded in what looked like an inch of polyurethane. Talk about country, sort of makes me look civilized.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 08:57 AM
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Thanks, Chandler

I will leave it flat on the floor, then--any advice on how to cut a clean hole in the bottom for a drain?

Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Welcome to the forums! It can and has been done. The bath I saw had an overflow and drain set up next to a wall so they weren't seen, but it was sitting flat on the floor. I think if you try to elevate it, the bottom won't hold the weight of the water much less a body. In addition, the walls were corrugated galvanized steel panels, the sink was a feed bucket set slightly into a custom countertop with bar sink controls on the countertop. The floor was old newspaper ads imbedded in what looked like an inch of polyurethane. Talk about country, sort of makes me look civilized.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 10:03 AM
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A bimetal hole saw attachment for a drill comes to my mind.

This is interesting thread. How does one propose then to have drain flange not be higher than bottom of tub so all the water can drain out. It almost seems like you have to take it to machine shop and have tub punch pressed to create a recess so flange does not stick up in the air like 1/4 inch. Or, to do it yourself, creatively by supporting tub, and then hit down with a hammer ontop a big pipe to act like a punch press to get that recess created, like drain holes have, so the flange of the drain can be recessed.

Maybe Chandler knows how the tub was done he is familiar with. Then again, maybe they did not have the world's greatest drain and had water retained in the tub some, afterwards.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 11:42 AM
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Not sure how they did the drain, but it appeared the flange was set down a little. Possibly done by hand, as I know they didn't have access to a metal shop for the job. And sitting on the floor, really meant sitting about 1/2" high, since the water trough I saw had a bottom rim for rigidity. I dont think they ever got all the water out, since it wasn't slanted, anyway. Looked good, though.
 
 

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