Floodsafe Connectors


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Old 11-19-07, 08:55 AM
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Question Floodsafe Connectors

Hello,

I was hoping I could get people to offer their opions or comments on a product that Watts makes. They refer to them as Floodsafe Connectors. For anyone that may not already know they are replacement hoses for your supply lines (toilets, washing machine, dishwasher, faucet hot & cold). There is a valve built into the hose that is designed to shutoff if it detects higher than normal pressure going through. Such as from a rupture of hose break.

I am giving consideration to changing all my supply hoses to these in the next few months. One reason being all are original (14+ yr old) hoses and this appears to be a great option and opportunity. I am sure there may be downsides to the product but they appear to be an item that could save serious water damange, in comparison to your "standard" supply hose.

Any comments, thoughts or opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
 
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Old 11-20-07, 07:00 PM
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I use floodsafe tubes in my house, but selectively. Don't use them on toilets, as the pressure fluctuations will set them off. Use them on washing machine, dishwasher and faucets, however. Another product to check into involves a switch and sensor you install in your main line in the basement at the water heater. If it senses water on the floor, it shuts off the water supply.
 
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Old 11-21-07, 05:07 PM
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Chandler,

Why is the switch and sensor by the water heater? What if any line ruptures before that switch?; what good will that do then? You'd think it be right at the meter.
 
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Old 11-21-07, 05:49 PM
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I think the theory is the lead in line first enters the water heater, should anything from that point rupture (and since the water has several points of failure) it would hit the floor and cut the water off. I actually have mine before the pump tank, just as the water enters the basement, so hopefully the main line won't be the culprit. However, all bets are off if the main line bursts ahead of the unit. But you gotta start somewhere. These are "homeowner" type switches, not of the quality that would be used at meters, I guess.
 
 

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