Toilet water supply pipe replacement/repair


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Old 11-26-07, 07:55 AM
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Toilet water supply pipe replacement/repair

The water supply pipe to our toilet is old and leaking. I think it might be that the packing (?) needs replaced in the valve, but my husband thinks there is a crack in the pipe. Is this a job that can be accomplished by a novice, or best reserved for a professional? Money is tight, so doing it ourselves is more desirable. Thanks!
 
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Old 11-26-07, 01:45 PM
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Welcome to the forums! You will, first, have to determine who is right, whether the leak is in the packing or from the lead in pipe. Turn the water off at the valve, flush the toilet and remove the hose to the toilet (swing it into a pot nearby). If it is the packing, it will be leaking from under the handle. If it is leaking from the wall, well, new ball game. Which is it? Packing is simple, but you will have to turn the water off to the house while you do it, since you will have to disassemble the valve. After all is done, I would replace the hose to the toilet with a stainless steel braid hose which requires only hand tightening at either end.
 
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Old 11-26-07, 03:51 PM
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What Chandler said. Replace the old supply tube with the stainless wrapped tube, sized to fit your needs, probably 6, 9, or 12". Lubricate the shutoff valve stem. While the water is off, replace the toilet fill valve and flapper with the Fluidmaster kit(about $12). You will be ahead of the game.
 
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Old 11-26-07, 04:19 PM
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Definitely a DIY job. The toilet supply valve is easy to repair and usually even easier to replace.

The important thing is to determine exactly how it is leaking.
The location of the leak will determine what needs to be done. Usually the leak is where the tank supply line connects to the valve. It may have loosened or the seal may be shot. Another leak area is around the valve stem. It may also be leaking where the valve connects to the supply pipe.

The entire fix should be less than $10 assuming you don't replace the toilet flush valve assembly. I'm a believer in the old "if it ain't broke .... " axiom. If the budget is tight there's no need to replace something that's working and take a chance on causing another problem.
 
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Old 02-12-08, 12:08 PM
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Red face

Originally Posted by cwbuff View Post
Definitely a DIY job. The toilet supply valve is easy to repair and usually even easier to replace.

The important thing is to determine exactly how it is leaking.
The location of the leak will determine what needs to be done. Usually the leak is where the tank supply line connects to the valve. It may have loosened or the seal may be shot. Another leak area is around the valve stem. It may also be leaking where the valve connects to the supply pipe.

The entire fix should be less than $10 assuming you don't replace the toilet flush valve assembly. I'm a believer in the old "if it ain't broke .... " axiom. If the budget is tight there's no need to replace something that's working and take a chance on causing another problem.
Hi: New to this sight, but hope I can get an answer concerning this subject. I have a toilet water supply valve that will not shut off, even with pliers. I want to replace some parts in the toilet that requires shutting off the water. How can I repair or replace the supply valve itself? Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 02-12-08, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by BobKenn View Post
Hi: New to this sight, but hope I can get an answer concerning this subject. I have a toilet water supply valve that will not shut off, even with pliers. I want to replace some parts in the toilet that requires shutting off the water. How can I repair or replace the supply valve itself? Thanks for the help.
Been there, done that. Want to save yourself from a big hassle ?:
Get a bucket and...
WORK FAST.
Why ? Replacing these valves can be a huge pain, especially if the bathroom is on the first floor. You must do a whole-house drain of the lines, and this can take up to 2 hours before the line at the wall is finally "dry". Otherwise, you'll just waste tons of propane and solder trying to install a new valve as the drips come thru the line.
If you've got THREADED connections, then this does not apply....as I am talking a SWEATED connection.
Point is: that valve does not have to be perfect as it remains "open" 99.9% of the time.
 
 

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