Basement Sink Installation


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Old 03-06-08, 08:07 AM
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Basement Sink Installation

Hi -

I'm getting ready to put in a sink in our basement, which will be used occasionally when we have cookouts, and also when I want to wash things out that are too grubby to put in the kitchen sink.

The main drain to the street is higher than the sink, so I will need to put in some kind of pump(?) to get the water up into the drain pipe. I will do all the installation myself, but leave the final connection to a plumber so that everything is on the up-and-up.

Could someone please recommend a pump, or whatever is needed, to do what I want? It doesn't need to be high capacity (I don't think), something that turns on only when needed, and one that wont break the bank.

Thanks - Dave
 
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Old 03-06-08, 08:11 AM
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Once you add a pump to what is normally a gravity sewer system you open up a whole new chapter of things that can go wrong.

Codes are quite explicit concerning what you want to do. It would probably be a good idea to get the plumber involved during the planning stage.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 08:17 AM
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Can you elaborate

Hi -

Could you elaborate on the things that could go wrong?

Dave
 
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Old 03-06-08, 08:37 AM
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Sewer lines are sized by the number of "Drainage Fixture Units" (DFU) that are emptying into the sewer. A drain line that is too large is almost as bad as a drain that is too small in that it will not have the proper water level and flow rate to keep the solids moving.

Most residential sewers are three or four inch nominal size. I don't recall exactly what the DFU rating is on these lines (you can Google drainage fixture units for an education) but most pumps will have an output flow vastly in excess of the sewer pipes DFU capacity. This can, in worst case scenarios, cause the sewer to back up and upchuck in some of the other drains ion the house.

At the very least you need to study what your LOCAL code has to say about pumped sewer connections.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 12:37 PM
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Thanks

Thanks for the info. As I wrote, this will be a sink used occasionally for liquids only - no solids or waste, just liquids.
 
 

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