NewToilet Flapper Has A Slow Leak


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Old 04-16-08, 01:13 PM
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NewToilet Flapper Has A Slow Leak

Hello, I just put a new flapper in toilet and it has this very slow leak to it and the tank keeps emptying. The chain is set correctly and I cleaned around the rim, but it still leaks!
I lived here for 8years and the toilet does not look real old, (dont think it is the original)!
Any suggestions on what I may do to fix this problem? Is there anything I can put around the rim to help seal it better? Thanks
 
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Old 04-16-08, 03:18 PM
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Could be the new flapper is bad, but they are cheap. Check again around the flapper seat for nicks, corrosion. You may have missed something. You said you checked, but make sure there is not tension on the flapper from the chain.
 
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Old 04-16-08, 03:27 PM
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Just Bill:
I forgot to mention that this is the second stopper I had bought. The bad one that I replaced was wit the (ball looking) kind that dropped straight down from a rod and that one leak a little too, so I bought a flapper type that goes directly on the chain.
I starting to think it is the seat itself, I cleaned it with steel wool and even tried sand paper (lightly) around the seat.
Although the seat does not look too bad, I am thinking maybe its worn, what do you think? If it is are they hard to replace? Thanks
 
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Old 04-16-08, 03:39 PM
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Had one of those once, drove me nuts until I took tank off, Fitting between tank and base was cracked
 
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Old 04-16-08, 04:26 PM
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Do you mean the Valve Seat was cracked?
I dont have any leaks outside the tank!
 
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Old 04-16-08, 04:55 PM
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I was just given this tip, for replacing the Valve seat.

If you don't want to separate the tank from the bowl to repair a damaged flush valve, then a retrofit valve-seat replacement kit is a good choice. Consisting usually of a stainless steel or plastic seat valve, an epoxy-putty ring, and a flapper. The super-tough epoxy putty adheres the entire unit onto the old seat and these kits can be used over brass, china, or plastic flush valves.

Anyone know anything about this procedure? Thanks
 
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Old 04-16-08, 06:34 PM
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Replacing the seal between the bowl and the tank is not difficult. Should take 30 minutes tops (unless you've got rusty bolts, but the repair kits come with new ones so you can cut them off).

It could be leaking between the tank and the rubber gasket but draining into the bowl. If you press down on the flapper does the draining stop?

Do you really want to play with epoxy (smell, sticky, messy) vs unscrewing two bolts and the water line to the tank?

Repair kit should run $14 and should last another 8 years. Only gotcha is do not overtighten the bolts between the tank and the bowl - and use the washers! Metal nuts have a way of chipping porcelain. You want 'secure', not 'cranked down'.
 
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Old 04-17-08, 03:22 AM
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I held the flapper down and the water still leaked out of the tank but no visable water on the outside of the tank at all. Also the bolts are rusted very badly that hold the tank on.
So what do you think is leaking here and how do I fix it? Thanks
 
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Old 04-17-08, 11:39 AM
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You may also be losing water between the tall tube that the flapper attaches to and the tank. There's a gasket under it that may also leak.

I'd recommend replacing all the stuff in the tank at the same time, including the fill valve. Everything should be available at a home repair store.

I'd also recommend that if you haven't done something like this before, take a digital picture so you can compare when you are done. It's a safety net that doesn't cost anything to do, and you have a reference for later.

Obtain the parts before you disassemble (unless you have another bathroom in the house!). If you took the picture, bring it to the hardware store and show one of the people that you want to replace everything inside the tank. They'll know what to give you. Make sure you've got the tank to bowl bolts+washers+nuts. Expect under $20 for all the stuff - unless you got a fancy designer toilet.

Shut off the water to the tank. Unscrew the pipe that feeds the water to the bottom of the tank. Drain water. Cut the rusty bolts. Dremel with a cutoff disc if you have one, otherwise you're going to have to unscrew with wrench or socket. If it's badly rusted it should snap when torque is applied, and you'll scrape your hand on the bottom of the tank.

At this point all the remaining water you didn't get out of the tank will run on the floor, so have towels.

After this, you'll see the nasty black gasket. Take that off (it will stain whatever it touches black including your hands). Then you'll see a big plastic nut. That holds the long tube where the flapper valve is connected to. Remove the nut. Need a big wrench to fit it, but it's not really that tight. Remove the tube. Take out the new parts and put them where the old parts were.

Reassemble the tank to the bowl. You want to use equal pressure on the nuts which attach the tank to bowl. Do a couple of turns on the left side, then some on the right side. Snug the nuts and try (gently) to rock the tank side to side - it shouldn't move.

Reattach water, set the flapper. Fill tank with about 1" of water and then check for leaks. If none, go to 4" water and check again. If still none, then fill 'er up.

Test flush. Watch it fill. Make sure it stops. Look and listen for leaks. Then you're done
 
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Old 04-17-08, 02:34 PM
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edtheunixguy
Thank you for the instructions, I can buy the things at home depot near me and will let you know how it turns out!!!!!!!
 
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Old 04-17-08, 04:59 PM
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An easy extra step which has solved "mystery" tanks leaks for me in the past: if the interior bottom of the tank is not perfectly smooth,



take a bit of emory paper and smooth the bottom around the bolt holes, and if you are replacing it, the valve.
 
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Old 04-17-08, 05:38 PM
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Hi, The picture in the previous post is great. Look where the hose is attached to the overflow, That is correct, If your hose goes down the inside of the pipe it will siphon out the water and give you the problem you are having. An easy check befor you replace everything.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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Old 04-17-08, 08:40 PM
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One last thing - you should never have a nut directly touching porcelain. Inside the tank there should always be something soft (a gasket, a rubber washer, etc) touching ceramic. On the outside, there should always be a washer touching the porcelain - not a nut!
 
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Old 04-18-08, 03:12 AM
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I really appreciate all you Guys jumping in here with great advice. Later I would like to know how Michael Thomas got such a beautiful (flawless) picture attached to the reply, but for now here is what I did so far, I went to Home depot an bought all new guts for the tank. Now I put the exact same flapper in, it is a round (ball like) shape and it drops straight down from a small Rod.
I filled the toilet up and did not see or hear any leaks, so I thought everything was fine but just to make sure I filled the tank and then shut it OFF for the night and by morning it did go down BUT ONLY by a half inch (no more).
On refilling it again, it is still dropping down only that half inch (as far as I can see)
I will the suggestion of smoothing down the rusted bolts with emery cloth.
Is there any place it can leak that would only take a half inch of water out? Thank You
 
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Old 04-18-08, 03:56 PM
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Hi, Did you check the hose into the overflow?
Woodbutcher
 
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Old 04-18-08, 07:20 PM
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Hose to the overflow - Good idea. And make sure the tank isn't filling past the 'max fill' level.

Time for some creativity. Do you have blue food coloring? Two or three drops in the tank above the flapper and watch where the dye goes (don't stir it). In the AM, check to see if you have blue water in the bowl. You can use yellow or red too, but - well - you may scare someone with your freaky water colors.

Does your tank have a float in it (big ball like thing that turns the water on and off)? If so, did it get replaced too? I.e, is there a hole in the float?

The idea behind the emery cloth is to sand the porcelain where a gasket will be to ensure a good seal. .
 
 

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