Tank won't fill unless sink faucet first running


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Old 08-03-08, 06:50 PM
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Question Tank won't fill unless sink faucet first running

This sounds nuts, I know, but I have a toilet that flushes fine, but then the tank will not fill with water unless the sink faucet is first turned on for 10 seconds or so. This just started happening and I am perplexed. Has anyone had this experience??? Thanks!
 
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Old 08-03-08, 07:17 PM
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Sounds like it is time to replace the fill valve.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 03:25 PM
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i agree with you. that is just to weird
 
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Old 08-07-08, 10:39 PM
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Ok, you are nuts!!! LOL Sounds crazy. I have to agree with plumbingods....replace the fill valve.

My guess...the fill valve is sticking, by turning on the sink faucet you reduce the water pressure on the fill valve just enough to cause it to unstick.

What happens if you flush the toilet and than tap the fill valve? Does it start to work? Hmmmmmmm.......
 
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Old 08-08-08, 04:26 AM
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a joke

what happens when you turn on the washer machine ?
does the dish washer come on? lol he he he
 
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Old 10-20-08, 11:10 AM
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crocus1957

Hi: I don't know why people are making fun at your question because this is happening to me too. I was looking for an answer to this same question. First thing in the morning, my master bathroom toilet flushes but won't fill up until I turn on the sink tap. I was going to ask if it had to something with water pressure. Do you live in a townhouse complex like I do? My neighbours on either side have gone on vacation and turned off their water supply, and my problem just started after they left.
 
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Old 10-20-08, 12:52 PM
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We weren't making fun of the question, it is just a very weird problem. One that doesn't flow the normal chain of events one would expect when you flush the toilet.

Anyhow, since we didn't get any type of reply as to how crocus1957 fixed the problem.....I will go back to the first theory, replace the fill valve in the toilet.

However, before you do that; do us all a favor. Remove the cover the tank, so you can see all the inner workings. Flush the toilet and note if the float on the fill valve drops down or not. I will suspect it doesn't. Now while you are watching the float (if it didn't drop) turn on the sink. What should happen is the float will drop and the toilet will begin to fill with water.


Your neighbors having their water supply shut off, "shouldn't" have any bearing on your supply. They are all independent of each other and "shouldn't" have any effect one way or an other on each other.

Please let us know what happens as this is an odd ball problem, which would be interesting to know what the actual problem turns out to be.

Crocus, if you are still out there.....let us know what you did. Sorry if you felt we were making fun of you or your problem, not what anyone meant to do. This just is one of those problems that doesn't make sense, so I guess you have to laugh at.
 
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Old 10-20-08, 03:27 PM
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I was going to ask if it had to something with water pressure.
Lindylou, you might just be right!

Here's a possibility. If your unit and the units on either side of you are all connected to the same water source it could be a problem of your water heater expansion tank having failed and as a consequence you develop high water pressure overnight. For this to be happening you would all have to be on a common water meter.

Does each residence receive a water bill for their own usage?

This could also be the problem that crocus is experiencing. My theory is that when the water pressure rises as a result of thermal expansion it reaches a point where the weight of the plastic float is insufficient to open the toilet fill valve. Opening the sink faucet reduces this overly high pressure and the float drops. The toilet is fine until another period of hot water usage is followed by a fairly long period of no water usage and the pressure again rises.

Having an automatic ice maker would likely conceal this problem at times because the action of refilling the icemaker would also reduce the overly high pressure.
 
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Old 10-20-08, 03:57 PM
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Furd,
That all sounded pretty good, I had actually started on the same path but than a few things started making me rethink that logic.

Higher pressure from the water heater would have to get past the check valve located in the inlet side of the water heater. Of course this valve could be non existant and in that case, there would be a "chance" the pressure of the cold line could be increased. However, more pressure on the fill valve would cause it to release easier or possibly leak through the valve when it was closed.

I haven't come up with a good reason as to why the sink has to be ran in order for the valve to release, seems to be backwards. I still believe it is just a case of the fill valves sticking. Maybe the change in pressure when the sink is turned on gives just enough of a "jiggle" to allow the float to drop.

Like I said before, this is not a logical problem.
 
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Old 10-20-08, 04:16 PM
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However, more pressure on the fill valve would cause it to release easier or possibly leak through the valve when it was closed.
I'll admit to not having a great deal of experience with toilet fill valves but every other float or lever-operated valve I've seen (and there have been more than a few) the pressure was applied to the top of the disk and would therefore help keep the valve closed. That's why they put such long levers on float valves.
 
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Old 10-21-08, 05:23 PM
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Hi again: The toilet is working fine today, nothing is stuck. I didn't understand the thing about a water heater. Our townhouse complex is on one meter as far as I know as we don't have individual water meters. There are a total of 49 townhouses and everyone has to have their water pressure 55 and under (whatever that means, but someone on strata checked that when I moved in) because when the houses were newer ( now 20 yrs old) some pipes exploded because of too much pressure). Probably will have to change out all 3 toilets anyway as I have Crane Canada toilets that have faulty tanks (class action suit in Canada in the late 1990s). Thanks for the replies.
 
 

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