Closet flange replacement


  #1  
Old 09-20-08, 07:20 PM
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Closet flange replacement

Alright guys, got a question.

My toilet closet flange was corroded so severely, it felt like leaves.

A guy I worked with a HD sold me a "closet flange Super Ring".

Well, this flange will just rest over so slightly on top of the hub rim, and the corroded one was below. Will this still work?



 
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Old 09-20-08, 08:23 PM
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what are you going to fasten it down with, how thick is it, do you think that it will hold down your toilet. if you use a wax ring with a plastic drain guide that may work.

life begins when the kids leave home and the dog dies
 
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Old 09-20-08, 11:34 PM
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Photo:B & D Home Plunbing
 
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Old 09-21-08, 06:35 AM
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I have tapcons to secure it to the slab. I'm just wondering if this black flange in the photo sits on top o this closet flange.
 
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Old 09-21-08, 08:56 AM
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Hot, in my completely non plumber opinion,I think something like this will work better.

http://www.wantasub.com/bayflange.html

It fits under whats left of your old flange, not just on top of it.
There are other types as well, this is just the first I found to illustrate what I mean. Someone posted a while back more what I'm talking about, but I can't find it.

I always felt that the SuperRing works better for solid cast or PVC flanges that have a chunk broken out, not the rotating rings that are completely rusted away.
 
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Old 09-21-08, 09:59 AM
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Yeah, I saw those on the web too, but our big box don't sell those. I might take a trip to the plumbing supply store and check with them. Thanks for your reply.
 
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Old 09-21-08, 10:00 AM
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Hello,

The ring you have should work fine provided you get it anchored to the floor and put a bead of caulking between the flange and the ring. Also use a wax ring with a plastic horn.

All the seal does is hold back 1.6 gallons per flush from leaking out the sides with no pressure, as it is going directly down the drain.

Back in the days of lead closet ells, all they did was raise the lead above the floor and pounded it over the edge of the floor. There was no flange to bolt to. They used what is commonly known as closet screws, which anchored directly into the wood.
So technically, the plastic flange you have will stop the leaking combined with a wax ring, and the flange is only there to anchor the toilet.

If you look at the cut away picture that jhoward has provided will explain it all.
 
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Old 09-21-08, 10:10 AM
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Thanks Mark.
I will anchor it with a few 2 3/4" tapcons and some silicone. I also got a wax ring with the horn, so looks like everything is in order. I appreaciate all your time.
 
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Old 09-21-08, 10:31 AM
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I bow to those more knowledgeable than I!

I am wondering though, is the bottom of the ring relieved to allow your toilet mounting bolts to move? Can't tell from the pic. I've only looked closely at the cheap ones which are flat, IIRC.

Also, from a guy who hates plumbing stuff...lol...check the clearance for the tabs on the bottom of your toilet. Even the maker recommends that twice on the instructions. Probably common sense, but sometimes I know I run kinda short of that.

http://www.superiortool.com/tools/plumbaccess/21015.htm
 
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Old 09-24-08, 11:20 AM
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What's the rule of thumb for replacing a toilet? Put the wax ring on the toilet or the floor? Things tend to move around when you try to get over the bolts and line it all up
 
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Old 09-24-08, 11:50 AM
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Jack ....back again huh? Lol Just a helpful hint...you should start a new thread when you have a question. Some folks will see a thread that they've already replied too, and not re-check it.

As to your question, I think many do it different, but I like to clean off the bottom of the bowl, and put the seal on the bowl first. I use the seals with the funnel, so if for whatever reason I have some sort of gap, I don't want it at the toilet/wax joint.
To help line it up when setting, put some straws over the flange bolts. If they don't have the nuts that hold them in place, a glob of the old wax will hold them upright as you set the bowl.
 
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Old 09-24-08, 01:02 PM
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Thanks Gun. I like the straw idea
 
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Old 09-24-08, 01:21 PM
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Hi Jack,
Gunguy is correct about starting a new thread. You will normally get more replies, and it does not take away from the original posters problem.

I have always put the wax on the flange and have never had any problems. That is just my way.
I like the straw idea. There have been a few times I could have used it.
I use a regular was seal on brand new toilets with perfect flanges, but I usually decide if I should use the seal with the plastic horn after pulling the toilet and examining the flange. It also depends on which wax ring I have in stock at the time.
 

Last edited by plumbingods; 09-24-08 at 04:56 PM.
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Old 09-24-08, 02:38 PM
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Jack hijacked my thread..... Haha, just kidding.

Gunguy, I'm actually glad he did, because I didn't see your recent reply to my situation. I'm gonna have to check and see if this flange will not protrude outside the toilet base. Thank you for bringing that up.

And yes, it's the flat type of flange.
 
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Old 09-25-08, 04:18 AM
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If the flange is paper thin then putting a coller around it wont help to prevent any cracking or breakage when reseating the watercloset. They do make "repair" flanges that you insert in the existing 3" drain right on top of the old flange. After insertion there are three screws you tighten and the lower half of the inserted peice expands against the inner walls of the pipe to hold it and create a seal.
 
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Old 09-25-08, 11:55 AM
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I would only recommend the repair flange Dopey84 is suggesting as a last resort. It restricts the hole size of the flange.
 
  #17  
Old 12-14-08, 05:53 PM
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Question flange in concrete

Today while setting a toilet with a new wax ring, the (rusted) flange bolts pulled out of the concrete. (Geez) It appears the concrete has crumbled or worn in the area on one side and there's not a good place for the bolts to grab hold of the concrete. I removed the entire flange and the "super flange?" (metal collar type thing). I have plastic bags stuffed in the PVC pipe. Can I pour more mortar or concrete or something in the hole around the PVC pipe and set the flange back in it to mold around it (removing it before it is fully dry) and then let it cure and then put new bolts in? Will the new concrete bind to the old concrete? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Lisa A
 
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Old 12-14-08, 07:38 PM
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Just to make sure we are on the same page, are you talking about the bolts holding the toilet to the flange, or the flange to the floor?

I am assuming you are talking about the bolts holding the flange to the floor.
You can try pouring concrete around the flange with some bolts embedded in the concrete while it is wet and let to dry with them in there. If you try to put some concrete and then drill into it with some screws, it will most likely break right off.

If the toilet bolts to the toilet with no problems and the pipe in the floor is pretty tight, you can just hook the toilet to the flange with no leakage and then put some caulking under the rim of the base of the toilet for some rigidity.

If all else fails, you will need to break up a larger area of concrete and re-do it then put your flange back down.
 
 

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