toilet overflow pipe broken at base

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Old 01-02-09, 11:21 AM
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toilet overflow pipe broken at base

When changing the toilet flush valve, my husband bumped the overflow pipe, breaking it at the base, just above the rubber flapper. Can this be repaired (with some kind of plumbers glue or ??) or is it easy to replace? This toilet is probably about 20 years old, a standard type of toilet in California. I can't tell from feeling it, and I can't find any images on the Internet showing me how to change it, which makes me think maybe we need to get a whole new toilet??!!??
 
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Old 01-02-09, 11:37 AM
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If its a 2 piece (tank and bowl bolted together), you would need a new flush valve, which includes the overflow tube. Most common ones can be replaced with parts available at hardware stores and home centers.

You will need to remove the supply line, detach the tank from the bowl (2 or 3 bolts and nuts), remove the flush valve and take it with you to get a compatible replacement. It's not a big or complicated job normally, but may be a little frustrating. Complications can arrive with shutting off the water flow (leaking or frozen valves), removing the bolts (corroded nuts and access to them), and overtightening the tank back down to the bowl (cracked tank). With all the parts in hand, and no big problems, it's maybe a 1/2 hr job.
 
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Old 01-02-09, 01:18 PM
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If the overflow pipe was metal it may have become brittle with age.The brass will crumble easily.If this is what has happened you can often take tweezers,an ice pick etc and chip away the crumbled peices left in the unit without damaging the threads.

If it is plastic then the entire unit must be replaced assuming it is all one peice.that said it would take a strong hit to break the plastic so the damage might be significant.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 08:55 AM
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Update: The old part was plastic.
The bolts were completely rusted onto the wing nuts. I bought penetrating oil and tried that - it helped but not enough to get the wing nuts off. I spent several HOURS trying unsuccessfully to get the tank off the base. Finally I gave up, frustrated and ready to cry, and called my plumber neighbor. He came and used an electric SAW and sawed off the bolts between the tank and base. He then helped me remove all the old parts and install all new ones. What a life saver. I could not have done it without his help. I spent my whole weekend trying to fix my toilet. It took my neighbor about 30 minutes. Now it works like new.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 09:18 AM
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Glad its fixed. Sometimes experience and the right tools make all the difference. I said it can be frustrating if you haven't done it before.

Thats what neighbors are for...sounds like homemade cookie time!!
 
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Old 12-01-12, 05:40 AM
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My experience with This Same Problem Suggests TWO FAR-EASIER FIXES.

My Crane, Plastic Overflow ("+Fill") pipe, of a toilet manufactured 12+ years ago, was broken at the base and leaking so fast that if I held the pipe down the fill valve would cycle every minute. The pipe was still positioned by an unbroken tab -- which made Fix # 1. Easy. I resolved to try Fix #2 if Fix #1 failed. Fix #1 is still holding after five uses. TRY THESE IN ORDER:

Fix #1: While holding the pipe in position -- squarely to minimize the gap --dab LOCTITE MARINE EPOXY carefully around the base. (It is available from most home Depot stores. Use the Internet to get home delivery or check your local Home Depot's inventory.) Put a weight on the pipe to hold it in position. I used a narrow tile supported on the RIGHT SIDE of the TANK. Let dry for four hours. Then test four flushes.

Fix #2: Cary the broken pipe to a BIG hardware/home store. Get a piece plastic pipe -- OR flexible tube -- to fit INTO THE INNER DIAMETER of the broken pipe. Get a piece a little longer so you can trim-to-fit at home. Use the MARINE EPOXY to fasten the pipe/tubing into the old hole in the broken-off pipe stub.

(I had a New "Fluidmaster PERFORMAX" Fill Valve that had an extra attachment to squeeze the tube from the Fill Valve to the "Overflow+Fill" pipe. THAT caused me to break the darned pipe in the first place. I recommend the Cheaper Fluidmasters.)
 
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Old 12-01-12, 06:28 AM
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McLeanDave, welcome to the forums! Why go through all that trouble?? You can fix it right with the right parts and be done with it. I don't think the crutch fix is applicable here. Oh, I moved your "twinkies" post out. It wasn't relevant.
 
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Old 12-01-12, 10:10 AM
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You Don't Understand the Alternatives

The alternative's "Correct Parts" are far more expensive and what's worse are Very Very troublesom to install.

Your web site's automatic response to me said: "Break out the Home-Made Cookies." -- thereby changing the subject.

A nebie needs to know the DEFINITION of a "Quick Response".

I reccommend that you take down your last posting on this thread -- the Earlier Quick one was more appropriate.
 
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Old 12-01-12, 10:16 AM
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Re: "The Crutch" comment

Your use of "Crutch" is ambiguous: IF uou meant the object I used to steady the pipe while the Epoxy set, that was nescessary because of the side-ways force of the rubber tube between the Fill Valve and the Broken Pipe.
 
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Old 12-01-12, 12:20 PM
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Not sure what is happening when the site requests things like you said. Something is in error, obviously.

What I meant by "crutch", was the entire "glue" fix suggested. Parts for a toilet are not expensive, and fixing something as critical as an overflow tube on a toilet with epoxy, just seems counterproductive. It must be completely water tight, and it would be difficult to guarantee that with an epoxy fix.
 
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Old 12-01-12, 12:45 PM
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Examples

All the other guys say to separate the tank from the bowl and replace two-each bolts, nuts and washers (and even the tank!), I challenge TWO people to do that in 150% of the time that I (solo) took.

Below is the web site's aparently automatic reply to my first post. (I did not notice the old date when it flashed up.):
01-05-09, 12:18 PM#5
Gunguy45

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Glad it's fixed. Sometimes experience and the right tools make all the difference. I said it can be frustrating if you haven't done it before.

Thats what neighbors are for...sounds like homemade cookie time!!
 
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Old 12-01-12, 12:57 PM
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The response you refer to is one Vic made back in 2009 to the original poster. You hijacked their post, and consequently all the posts therein. I see how it happened. It wasn't directed to you. But, that's cool.

I always install toilet tanks totally sealed as you indicate. Very easy, and only requires one extra set of nuts and washers. Sure saves the day when you have to perform a total take down like you have to do. Takes about 5 minutes, tops.
 
 

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