How do I replace PVC toilet flange?


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Old 02-12-09, 02:34 PM
J
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How do I replace PVC toilet flange?

Hi, I have a PVC toilet flange that is broken on both sides where the bolts are supposed to go to hold the toilet down. I temporarily fixed this by using Superior Tool's Super Ring. Unfortunately, the added height of the metal ring plus the screw heads I used means the back of the toilet sits a little high. So the only good fix is to replace the flange altogether.

I've never done it and am looking for advice. I have some access from below, but ductwork is in the way. One duct you see in the pic and another comes into play a little downstream.

So, we have a 3" flange that sits outside of a 90 degree elbow, then a bit of straight pipe, then a 45 degree bend, then a long run of pipe. I think I could possibly cut this after the 90 degree elbow. Assuming I can cut that straight enough, there would be 1 inch of pipe sticking out of the 45 degree bend. Is that enough pipe to attach a straight fitting to? Or should I cut out the 45 degree bend, too?

Also, what is the best order to do all of this? Should I screw the new flange into the floor, then do all the welding downstairs?

Thanks!

 
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Old 02-12-09, 02:51 PM
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They make repair pieces that fit under the flange...sorta 1/4 moon shaped that might be a better repair. They fit under the flange, not on top, so when you tighten down, it pulls them together.

If you don't want to do that..you'll prob have to cut back to the horizontal section and replace. You could use a cable PVC cutter or a piece of twine and cut right at the flange of the horizontal 45 and just build back from there. IMH diy opinion...trying to cut at the joint of the 90 and 45 would be more work.
 
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Old 02-12-09, 03:32 PM
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Smile

Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
They make repair pieces that fit under the flange...sorta 1/4 moon shaped that might be a better repair. They fit under the flange, not on top, so when you tighten down, it pulls them together.

If you don't want to do that..you'll prob have to cut back to the horizontal section and replace. You could use a cable PVC cutter or a piece of twine and cut right at the flange of the horizontal 45 and just build back from there. IMH diy opinion...trying to cut at the joint of the 90 and 45 would be more work.
Agree with Gunguy. As cheap as PVC is, I would opt to replace from the horizontal piece back and screw to subfloor. My $.02 worth!
 
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Old 02-12-09, 03:53 PM
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Since you can get to it, replace the pipes underneath. The only other option would be to (since you have an "outy" flange) cut around the perimeter of the inside of the flange and replace it with an inside glue flange. But you have the best of situations with access. Often it isn't that way.
 
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Old 02-13-09, 06:38 AM
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Thanks for the feedback. I will replace everything back to the horizontal run.

One more question. I was looking at flanges at the store and noticed they have a metal/PVC combo where the fitting is PVC but the ring that screws into the floor is metal. Should I use that kind? Seems like I wouldn't have a problem to begin with if that kind of flange was originally used. Looks similar to below:
 
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Old 02-13-09, 07:55 AM
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Again..just my DIY opinion...

A PVC flange properly installed and a toilet that is not overtightened to the flange should work just as well or better than a 2 piece style.

The metal flanges give you some adjustablity to get it square to the wall before screwing it down. If you glue the PVC slightly off..you are stuck.

If thats a stainless ring on the metal one, that might be ok. I've seen more rusted metal flanges than I have broken PVC....not that I've seen that many of either one...lol
 
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Old 02-14-09, 10:22 AM
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yes yes yes and make sure the metal part is stainless steel !

those plastic flanges are junk and 9 out of 10 jobs i go to that the toilet rocks it is because of a broke flange and 9 out of 10 of those are plastic flanges with the others being iron flanges. sometimes the plastic flange isnt broke but let the bolt for the toilet slip through because the bolt goes through the weakest part of the flange. you will not have any of those problem with a properly installed plastic/metal flange.

for a diy'er i would say go under a cut out and replace the fittings. i personally would not even go under but how i would do it is a secret i will take to the grave
 
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Old 02-14-09, 11:19 AM
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I agree that the best possible repair here is to cut out the fittings below the floor, add a new coupling, then replace the 45*, Street 90* and flange with all new.
As far as the flange material is concerned, I used to swear by the metal/plastic flanges until I kept finding them rotted. They now have them with SS, or just plain plastic flanges. I have been using the all plastic flanges for a few years now with no issues. The newer plastic flanges are much better than the older original PVC flanges.
 
 

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