Installing a separate long hose from my sink?


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Old 08-15-09, 02:37 PM
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Installing a separate long hose from my sink?

Hi everyone,

I live in a 2 floor apartment but don't have any water upstairs. To water my plants (which are all upstairs) I have carry many watering cans full of water up, so I'd like a better solution.

Some people have suggested hooking up a hose to my kitchen sink downstairs.

First question - would there be enough pressure to go up one story?

2nd question - if so, how do I go about this? It's difficult to search for information online because all queries for "sink hose" etc. come up with information for the normal ~3 foot sprayer hoses that people have attached to their sinks to do dishes with.

I would be looking for a long (maybe 50 feet?) coiled (if possible) hose that would ideally remain hooked up at all times. So I'm thinking/hoping that it can be hooked up to the plumbing under the sink, so I don't have to constantly keep attaching/detaching it to the faucet.

Is there a name for this type of hose/setup that I can search for to get more information? Is this something that I can do myself? I know nothing about plumbing but it doesn't seem like it would be too complicated...

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 08-15-09, 02:52 PM
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It is extremely unlikely that you would have insufficient pressure to allow use of a hose to your second story. It only takes a little less than one-half psi per foot of elevation so if your second floor was ten feet above your first you would only "lose" about five psi in pressure and you most likely have at the absolute minimum 20 psi.

As for the long hose...I've seen such things in the "junk" catalogs such as Carol Wright, Lillian Vernon, Miles Kimball and the like in times past. I don't get these catalogs anymore and if I do I just toss them in the recycle so I don't know if they still carry such an item. They are not to be connected at all times and doing so would not be a safe idea in my opinion.

I just did a Google search using the term indoor plant watering hose and got lots of hits. They seem to be forty feet long and attach to a kitchen sink faucet. Prices around $20. plus shipping, of course.
 
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Old 08-15-09, 02:54 PM
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I suspect what people are suggesting is a hose adapter that takes the place of the aerator on the end of the spout and allows you to attach a garden hose to it.

This would obviously not be designed for permanent use.

Also I think it would be tough for that set up to push water as far as you're thinking though it might at a low pressure level by the time it went that far.

Otherwise you'd have to tap into a water line somewhere which wouldn't be a simple affair no matter where that was.It would require cutting into a supply somewhere,to a sink etc,and attaching a tee or inline valve that either had a hose threaed outlet or could be adapted.

Since you're in an apartment you would have to talk to your landlord before you altered the plumbing.

If you have a washing machine in your apt you might be able to tee off the cold water inlet with a hose wye and run it off of that.

Edit: those indoor plant watering kits are cheaply made so buy with caution.I've seen them in person and they are light plastic construction.
 
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Old 08-15-09, 06:03 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I did some searching around and found, in addition to the cheap-looking 1-piece hose kits, stuff like this:

Amazon.com: Claber 8583 Koala Indoor Faucet to Garden Hose Connector: Home Improvement

Would you recommend something like this, and then just connecting it to normal good-quality outdoor hose?


Also, maybe the water line to my sink is not normal - it does seem easy to tap into so I'll describe it:

This is all under my sink. From the wall there are, in addition to the drain pipe, two incoming pipes - one for the the hot and one for the cold water. They are each connected to a thin (maybe 1/2 inch?) copper pipe. At this joint, there are knobs with which I can cut off the flow of either the hot or cold water (or both) to the sink. These copper pipe are connected to semi-flexible mesh-like tubes which lead up to the sink.

So I was thinking that at one of the joints in the cold water pipe (either from the wall to the copper pipe, or from the copper pipe to the mesh tube), I would attach something like a 'Y' connector, and it would split the cold water stream into two - one for the sink as normal, and one for the hose.

Does that make sense? It seems like it would be straightforward with the right connectors, but again I have never done anything like this before so that's why I'm coming here for help


Thanks! This has been my first post here and so far the responses have been great.
 
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Old 08-15-09, 06:21 PM
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Figured I would attach a couple images. These are the two connections I was talking about. The width of the connection from the copper pipe to the mesh tube is approximately 1/2 inch.


 
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Old 08-15-09, 06:46 PM
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What you could do is to install a tee fitting between the mesh hose and the copper tubing on the cold water piping and then install an additional valve on the tee for the hose. I would then suggest that you get a length of rubber air hose and a "radiator filler" valve (for automobile radiator) and then couple this up for your watering hose. The air hose and radiator filler valve are made to contain pressure in excess of what normal household water pressure normally is although I would still recommend not having the hose pressurized except when actually in use.

Air hose is available from Harbor Freight Tools (Internet and also local stores) for reasonable prices and I think they may even have the radiator filler valve.
 
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Old 08-26-09, 03:42 PM
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similar problem

I have a similar situation - apt, terrace with plants, no outdoor spigot. My bathroom window is next to the terrace, and I would like to attach a snap coupling to the bathtub faucet so I can connect a garden hose and run it out the window in the summer months. The Claber 8583 Koala Indoor Faucet to Garden Hose Connector looks interesting, but the reviews are mixed - it seems to fit some faucets and not others. Did you go with this?

The tub faucet has 13/16 female threading, however, there is a 3/8" lip before the threading (reaching a finger inside, it's smooth for 3/8" before you feel the thread). I found a 15/16 snap coupling, but the only converters I can find to 13/16 are too short on the 13/16 end - they don't reach the threads inside the lip. I've been to specialty plumbing supply stores and hardware stores, to no avail. I'm told 13/16 snap couplings don't exist.

Anyone have ideas?
 
 

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