bathtub creaking

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  #1  
Old 12-20-09, 06:56 PM
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bathtub creaking

Hello.

My contractor installed Americast bathtub. After the installation and tiling was complete, I stepped into the tub, and found a creak every single step I move. He suggested spraying foam under the tub and it could help getting rid of creaking noise (but he said possibly still some noise). He will have to cut the side walls from the two bedrooms.

A couple questions I have:

1. Is spray foam a good way to go? The manual said "NO bedding of any kind" Would i be better of living with the creaking noise?
2. I just took a picture of the levelling in my bathtub and found that both back and front on the right side of the tub. the level is not entirely in the center. See the picture. it has the similar level when I put the level on the top (where faucet is) and bottom (the opposite side) Is this considered level?



Thank you.
chriss
 
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  #2  
Old 12-21-09, 01:32 AM
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I have installed 4 Americast tubs. After the first install I had the creaking you complain of. Here is why it creaks. The install was defective. There is a ledger board that runs under the back lip of the tub. It must be perfectlty level. The sides of the tub as well as the front of the tub must be perfectly level. The floor may not be. This requires the use of shims which are applied under the front of the tub. I learned that leveling and support is crucial and I take my time when doing it. Before any tiles go on I stand in the tub and listen for creaking which means that the tub is moving even though the exact amount is infintesimal. I always use electronic levels because I get better results.
The foam that your plumber wants to use is unlikely to resolve the issue. If he can access the ledger board ( actually a 4 ft 2x4) from the back (through a hole in the drywall of an adjacent room, then he can apply shims to level and support the tub. He should loosen the tub drain prior to doing this. It may also be necessary to apply shims to the front of the tub since floors are often not level. If there is already ceramic tile on the floor this may be difficult or impossible. If there is no space between the tub and first course of tiles, this repair can't be done w/o disturbing the tiles.
I am assuming there are tiles around the tub and he can't do a complete reinstall which would be the best way to remedy the situation. By the way, a tub that is not level often results in misaligned tiles. The tile guy assumes the tub is level and uses the tub as a guide to install the first row of tiles. To check for this look at the tiles on the three adjacent sides. Do they meet so that the grout lines are perfectly lined up. If not, the first row of tiles and as a result all subsequent rows were as unlevel as the tub. This is the mark of amateur and to correct the problem reqires a complete demo and reinstall.
I would be very upset if a pro did this job. Was he a jack of all trades handyman tackling his first tub install?
I see my response precedes the member's questions. Too late now to correct. My apologies for the error.
 
  #3  
Old 12-21-09, 08:42 AM
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Thank you.

The contractor did both tiling and tub installing. He had a guy help him when he installed the tub. I am upset with myself that I didn't check the tub when they installed the tub before tiling the walls. Too much trust I had!

The floor tiles in front of the tub is an existing one and they are level. The job was to replace the plastics three adjacent walls with tiles and replace the tub.

An access to tub can be done only through the sides. The back of the tub is next to the siding of the house. Access to tub can only be done through the sides of the tub. How possible to do work on it? The sides of the tub is as level as my picture shows. Only the left of the tub on both front and back that are completely level, I mean right in the middle. The rest pretty is pretty much like the picture.

I will check about the tiling when I get home tonight.

At this point, the contractor is so confident of his work. He suggested this Americast tub to me and said he installed in many houses. He said I could get an American standard rep come over and look at his work. Of coure, American Standard doesn't have onsite rep for this product as I found out when I called them. He is going to charge me 2 days of work if I have him re-installed as he believes it is not his fault but the tub and he said it might not fix the problem as he believes the move come from the bottom of the tub.

What will happen if I let this go, ie living with the creaking noise? Technically, to plumber's standard is the tub level?
 
  #4  
Old 12-21-09, 10:52 AM
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First, don't be so hard on yourself for not checking the tub installation while it was in progress. Very few customers would. After all the contractor is a professional and you are entitled to expect professional results.
The install is absolutely defective. Even w/o the creaking the tub is not level. This is unacceptable. If you had the manufacturer send a rep I believe he would agree. However, the maufacturer is in no position to force a reinstall at no additional expense to you. It is possible that the opinion of the rep might be persuasive in encouraging remedial work by your contractor. Unfortunately a reinstall is the only way to level the tub and remove the creaking. At the very least it would involve removing the first row of tiles all around the tub and then pulling the tub out and releveling. The backer board, if it overhangs the tub lip as it should (some don't do the overhang, I always do) would have to be trimmed to allow removal of the tub. This might only take a few hours but you'd have to get new matching tiles. But depending on the tile arrangement it could be more complictaed and more time consuming as well.
I lived with creaking for 5 years after my first tub install and the tub functioned fine though the noise was annoying. My wife did not notice the noise. Although I am not a pro I am a bit of a perfectionist. I had no one to blame but myself. After 5years I did a total bathroom remodel and installed a new tub correctly. The Americast tub is an excellent product, by the way.
If the grout lines don't meet on adjacent tub walls that is additional evidence of a faulty install, though the out of level
situation that your photo shows confirms this by itself.
I think your contractor is less than reputable. I would use stronger language but I think you know what I mean. He screwed up and won't admit it because it might cost him time to do the repair.
When we hire a contractor we never really know if the job will turn out right. Often it does, often it doesn't. A good contractor stands behind his work.
You could take the contractor to court and contact the Better Business Bureau if all else fails.
Please let us know what happens. This type of stuff happens all too often.
 
  #5  
Old 12-21-09, 11:57 AM
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That tub was set by someone that dosen't know what he is doing! the only one that would say it's o.k. is Mr. Magoo!
 
  #6  
Old 12-21-09, 01:33 PM
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Chris

If you hear creaking, that means only one thing, you have movement. That means that the tub is not installed correctly. Are you sure about the tub requiring "no bedding of any kind"? Some tubs definitely need to be supported with a mortar bed.

Americast tub doesnt tell us much. Giving the exact model may help, as someone hear may have installed that particular model.

No reason in the world why a brand new tub install should not be level, other than that the installer didnt give a crap.

By the way, a tub that is not level often results in misaligned tiles. The tile guy assumes the tub is level and uses the tub as a guide to install the first row of tiles.
If the guy is a "real tile guy" he's not gonna start setting tile on an unlevel surface. We have levels too. He'll start a little less than one tile higher using a level ledger board, and then come back and fill in the first row with the necessary cut pieces to make up for the out of level tub. Any experienced tile setter knows that the first row of tile he sets has to be perfectly level.

At this point, the contractor is so confident of his work. He suggested this Americast tub to me and said he installed in many houses. He said I could get an American standard rep come over and look at his work. Of coure, American Standard doesn't have onsite rep for this product as I found out when I called them. He is going to charge me 2 days of work if I have him re-installed as he believes it is not his fault but the tub and he said it might not fix the problem as he believes the move come from the bottom of the tub.
This guy sounds like a hack of all trades and a master of none. He's a plumber, tile setter and who knows what else? Did he use cement backer board on the walls? Did he install a vapor barrier over the studs? Did he tape and mud the joints between panels and corners? Did he use "real thinset" to set the tile or some premixed stuff in a bucket? That fact that he wants to charge you for 2 more days work because he cant use or doesnt own a level is outrageous.
 
  #7  
Old 12-21-09, 02:25 PM
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If the guy is a "real tile guy" he's not gonna start setting tile on an unlevel surface. We have levels too. He'll start a little less than one tile higher using a level ledger board, and then come back and fill in the first row with the necessary cut pieces to make up for the out of level tub.

A pretty big "if". The present installation is a case in point. Here the tub installer did not use a level properly. He also installed the tiles. If he did not level the tub, what makes you think he leveled the tiles?
Never-the-less, your description of how to set the first row of tiles is absolutely correct.
 
  #8  
Old 12-21-09, 04:48 PM
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Never-the-less, your description of how to set the first row of tiles is absolutely correct.
Been doing this for the last 35 years, so I certainly hope so.
 
  #9  
Old 12-21-09, 07:06 PM
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It is Princeton. the model is 2390.202.020 Yes the manual says no bedding and the American Standard rep confirms so.

It appears the grout/caulk on the first row of tiles are even. However, the other grout rows above are a little bit off between walls.

On the sides, the level is off about 3/8 inch or so, according to my friend's estimate. The back is higher than the front.

My friend also wonders whether the noise is from the tub rubbing the sub floor. That's what the contractor thinks as well. Is that possible? This is very subjective. I kind of feel like the noise comes from the back and bottom.


So spray foam is a no go right? Or is it worth a try? I care little about void warranty but I don't want to do it if it doesn't really solve the problem or have some consequences in the future.

I am not sure the contractor will agree to adjust the tub without any charge. I am not good at confronting but will try to let him about the level.
 
  #10  
Old 12-21-09, 10:15 PM
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Spray foam has some chance ( how much I can't say) of reducing the creaking even though it should not have been needed. Before using foam I would see if I could tap in some wood shims under the front of the tub. The correct combination of shims stategically placed has a better chance of working. If the front edge of the tub rests on tiles this could be done easily. However the usual install has the tiles meeting the front edge of the tub and the front edge resting on a plywood substrate. In that case it would be necessary to remove to remove at least two tiles (one at the far right and one at the far left) so that the shims can be tapped in. Theoretically you might even be able to reduce the unlevelness (front to back) at this juncture but it would require additional steps such a unscrewing the drain and removing the caulking where the tiles meet the tub. For releveling even then the backerboard might have to be trimmed where it meets the tub. I could advise you on this further but if your goal is soley to reduce creaking you can skip the additional steps.
My recollection of the installation instructions that accompany this tub coinside with your statement that the use of a bed is not recommended. I believe that the manufacturer was thinking primarily in terms of a sand, mortar or cement bed which might damage the underside of the tub and interfere with the way the tub is supposed to be supported.
Your chance of removing the creak by using shims as I suggested depends upon where the creak originates from. So all I have suggested might not be successful anyway if the creak comes from the ledger board. And once the noise is gone your tub will still not be level. But it will function fine and my impression is that at this point you would be satisfied with merely removing the creak.
 
  #11  
Old 12-22-09, 06:59 AM
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Chris

If you hear creaking, then you have movement when you step in the tub. That particular model has a base, so no, it doesnt need a mortar bed, and I dont think expanding foam is going to be the solution.

A properly installed tub needs to be level along the back wall and from back to front. The top of the tub pitches sligthly inward so that all water channels into the tub. If the tub is not level, water can pool in the corners on the back wall or can run from back to front and onto the floor outside the shower. The stringer support on the back wall should have been installed perfectly level to support the tub. The apron should be fully supported and shimmed level side to side and back to front on both sides. If the subfloor was way out of level, the built in base on the tub may not be contacting the floor adequately. Does the bottom of the tub seem "bouncy" when you step in it?

Creaking means 2 hard surfaces are rubbing together. There are several posibilities. If you watched the installation, you might be able to isolate the problem. Some things to look for.

Where the tub apron meets the floor tile, is this area caulked or grouted? It should be caulked, not grouted, as grout rubbing against the tub when there is movement will cause a creak of sorts. If cement board was used on the floor as a substrate for the tile, was caulk used between the edge of the board and the tub apron? If not, this could also be your creaking noise.

What kind of wallboard was used in the tub surround, drywall (hopefully not), cement board, or something else? Did the wallboard lap over the tub nailing flange or was it cut to fit above the flange. If it overlaps, were the studs firred out with 1/4" material so that the wallboard is spaced off the studs enough so that it did not come in contact with the tub flange bowing the cement board inward? If the cement board (or whatever he used) is contacting the tub flange, that can cause a creak of sorts as well if there is any movement.

Is the joint where the tub meets the wall tile around the top and down the apron sides caulked, or grouted? It should be caulked, not grouted as that can cause a creaking noise as well.
 
  #12  
Old 12-22-09, 07:12 AM
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One more thing. The shim method I suggested will only help if the creaking comes from the front floor area. If the creaking comes from the where the ledger board is located support (the long area of the tub) the shim method is not likely to help.
If your contractor installs foam the entire underside will be a mess. Of course you won't see it but if you then decide to go the reinstall route, this would make the job more difficult. And someday you may want a new tub, though many people keep the same tub as long as they have their home.
At the very least before allowing foam I would insist on knowing what the contractor intended to do if the foam does not eliminate the problem. If he says, nothing else will be done and you at some point decide to consult another contractor, that individual will have to contend with foam removal as well. And because foam is notoriously sticky, the tub will be difficult to remove. Sometimes you have to look at the long term effects of a contemplated repair.
 
  #13  
Old 12-22-09, 12:39 PM
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First I like to say I really do appreciate your input/help/time to you both Retired Guy and Johnny

I couldn't agree more about the foam. I just want more opinion about it as I might miss something as the contractor suggest it. The more I think and what I found through the research, the foam seems to be messy in long term.

I think the contractor said he wouldn't do anything afterwards if the creaking noise is still there. He thinks it will alleviate but not completely cure it.

I did mention to him about the level of the tub as one of the American standard rep mentioned to me. I don't remember exactly what he said but something along the line that he doesn't buy the level would cause the problem. I will email him about the level though. Now that you guys explained to me more about it.

I am not sure how bouncy the tub is. I don't feel it much but just heard the noise. But a friend said he feels the bottom flexs on his foot. What does the "bouncy" indicate?

The front of the tub does NOT sit on the floor tiles. There was a tiny line space between the old tub and the floor tile. I didn't know at the time that it should be covered with some caulk. Anyway, with this new tub, the contractor put in some caulk I don't know if he put any grout inside. The subfloor has no cement or anything on it, just wood subfloor. I think I did step on it when the contractor removed on the tub and heard no noise on the subfloor.

The contractor told me he put grout inside and caulk outside along the line between the tub and wall tiles. Should that grout inside be removed? I read on some post that they suggest to fill water in and see if there is any crack on the caulk/grout. If nothing, then it is fine. I did and saw no crack along the line. But I don't know if the grout inside is cracking or not?

When the contractor did the work; he had my little bathroom radio on all the time and not sure it is loud enough that he didn't hear it or he just didn't notice the noise.

I happen to find that the faucet is moving when I touch it. He said he will look at it when he comes to do foam. At this point the last conversation I had with him is to do foam but as I am concerned/confused, I came for some help in this forum.

It seems to be a nice guy and explain/help me pick up materials, tiles and bathtub. I picked up material myself, of course with help of my friend.

How bad the consequences would be if I do nothing and live with the creaking noise. Retired guy, did you have exactly same bathtub (Princeton)? It went fine for 5 years? I mean no crack but just creaks.
 
  #14  
Old 12-22-09, 02:08 PM
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I am glad I could offer some help.
During the five years that I lived with the creak nothing bad ever happened. I used the same tub as you have and other than the noise which was annoying there was no disturbance to grout, caulk or tiles. To get a creak the movement of the tub need only be very, very small.
Johnny's response is about as comprehensive as anyone could have written. He knows his stuff. From my experience I think that the problem lies in the ledger board being unlevel and the apron not being properly shimmed. The other suggested causes are certainly possible but these two defects are what caused my creak.
One thing I failed to mention is that the rear lip of the tub is held tight with roofing nails in a correct install. It does not just rest on the 2 by 4. When the install is done properly (level ledger plus floor shims if needed), the nails plus the overhang of the backerboard plus the weight of the tub makes the tub immobile.
I would not recommend the foam for the reason I previously stated. I can see from the contractor's view why he would push this solution. First, it is easy. Second, it is fast. Third, it makes him look like he is being reasonable.
The fact that the tub is not level is an issue apart from the creak in the sense that not all unlevel tubs creak. However, it tells you something about the contractor's competency. In addition to this you have an annoying noise caused by tub movement which basically means that the tub is not properly secured or supported.
If you have any additional concerns or questions, please feel free to post them.
 

Last edited by retired guy 60; 12-22-09 at 03:22 PM.
  #15  
Old 12-23-09, 08:32 AM
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The contractor told me he put grout inside and caulk outside along the line between the tub and wall tiles. Should that grout inside be removed?
Those joints should only be caulked, not grouted. This could be the source of the creaking along with many other things. The grout should be removed, and the joint should be caulked only.
 
  #16  
Old 12-23-09, 10:38 AM
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Johnny,

I like to follow up to what you said. "Grout in the joints could rub against the tub" If that's the case, shouldn't I hear the creaking from where the joints are or notice the crack? I think the sound comes from mostly the bottom of the tub where I stepped on or stepped off the tub. Perhaps a little towards the back of the tub. I don't notice any crack either.

Though I got to admit; there is only one spot close to the joints when I push hard, there is a creak. But it happened only the first time, I couldn't reproduce the subsequent pushes. And it is a bit random.

thanks.
 
  #17  
Old 12-28-09, 10:38 AM
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Retired Guy,

I don't think I asked this question before. Could you clarify where you think the noise in your tub came from? From the bottom or back or front? Mine is from the bottom for sure and perhaps from the back when I put my foot toward the back of the tub.

i am not sure I can get my contractor to agree with re-installation and perhaps I might go through small court claim. I have never done but my friends suggested it. Not sure it is worth it? Or just live with the noise like you did

Thanks.
 
  #18  
Old 12-29-09, 05:51 AM
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Chris

I post #11 I asked you some questions, but you never answered them. Answering the questions will help to isolate you creaking issue.
 
  #19  
Old 12-29-09, 07:31 AM
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Johnny,

I thought I did in my subsequent post to yours and retired guy. But perhaps it wasn't clear as I addressed to both you and retired guy. Anyway I will try again here.

If you hear creaking, then you have movement when you step in the tub. That particular model has a base, so no, it doesnt need a mortar bed, and I dont think expanding foam is going to be the solution.
Ok. got it

A properly installed tub needs to be level along the back wall and from back to front. The top of the tub pitches sligthly inward so that all water channels into the tub. If the tub is not level, water can pool in the corners on the back wall or can run from back to front and onto the floor outside the shower. The stringer support on the back wall should have been installed perfectly level to support the tub. The apron should be fully supported and shimmed level side to side and back to front on both sides. If the subfloor was way out of level, the built in base on the tub may not be contacting the floor adequately. Does the bottom of the tub seem "bouncy" when you step in it?
I can't say about the level of the stranger as it is all closed now. But the back of the tub is not level as shown in the picture. I think the tub is not exactly level as my picture shows. But I don't know if that meet plumber's standard.

Not sure if it is bouncy. It creaks whenever I move. When I step out the tub it creaks when my foot is off the tub. I can't really feel it but my friend says it flexes.

I don't think the contractor uses any shimming.

Creaking means 2 hard surfaces are rubbing together. There are several posibilities. If you watched the installation, you might be able to isolate the problem. Some things to look for.
Sorry I didn't watch the contractor and his guy putting in the tub. The bathroom is rather small.


Where the tub apron meets the floor tile, is this area caulked or grouted? It should be caulked, not grouted, as grout rubbing against the tub when there is movement will cause a creak of sorts. If cement board was used on the floor as a substrate for the tile, was caulk used between the edge of the board and the tub apron? If not, this could also be your creaking noise.
I believe he said he caulked between tub apron and floor tile but I will verify with him. FYI, there was no caulk or anything in between with my old tub which I know it is not good.


What kind of wallboard was used in the tub surround, drywall (hopefully not), cement board, or something else? Did the wallboard lap over the tub nailing flange or was it cut to fit above the flange. If it overlaps, were the studs firred out with 1/4" material so that the wallboard is spaced off the studs enough so that it did not come in contact with the tub flange bowing the cement board inward? If the cement board (or whatever he used) is contacting the tub flange, that can cause a creak of sorts as well if there is any movement.
He used cement board. I don't have the answer to that question the flange. I remember he said he used the screws and he followed the instruction. I will ask him the question. At this point he might just say he did it, who knows. I will try to get him answer this question.

Is the joint where the tub meets the wall tile around the top and down the apron sides caulked, or grouted? It should be caulked, not grouted as that can cause a creaking noise as well.
I think we got on this point. I will relay your points to the contractor ie to remove the inside grout and put in only caulk. My follow-up question is whether I should hear the noise where the joint meets.

I know a couple questions are still unanswered. I just don't know the answer. I hope to get the contractor to answer questions honestly and willing to redo his work. I haven't heard from him yet. I emailed him to send along my pictures (level problem), not to do 'spray foam', and possibly to re-install the tub.


Thanks.
 
  #20  
Old 12-29-09, 08:10 AM
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I think my creak came from the back. Because noise can travel under the tub, it is difficult to know for sure where the noise originates. We know that motion causes the noise and we know that two hard surfaces are where the sound originates from. The stringer in the back that supports the tub is not level (my opinion). It has created a fulcrum and the back lip of the tub rises and lowers when you step into the tub. In addition to this, not shimming the apron (front of the tub) may have aggravated the problem caused by the unlevel stringer (the 4 ft. 2x4 that the tub rests on). I don't think grout along the tile/tub ledge is the culprit though I agree that caulk should have been placed there initially because it is both flexible and waterproof. Here are the sources of the creak based upon my faulty first tub installation:
1. the tub rubbing against the nails that secure it to the studs or even against the studs. If you could spray WD 40 back there the noise would cease (if this is the problem) but you can't because it is sealed by backerboard and tiles. Maybe you can spray some in from an opening on the side. Would do less harm and make less mess than foam.
2. the tub rubbing against the backerboard. We will assume the installer used something like Hardiboard which is a cement-like product frequently used for this appliction. One installation method overlaps the tub lip, another method does not. The former method is the better way to go. I think this is a possible but unlikely source of the noise.
3. if the tub drain pipe is touching framing lumber or floor substrate and it is rising and lowering wth the tub it will also make a squeak. You may be able to approach the drain from the ceiling below if it is open. Look for a place where friction or rubbing might exist.
I have sugessted shimming the apron because the goal is to minimize motion and floors are not always level. However, in my opinion (remember I am not a pro, nor do I pretend to be one) the most likely source of creak is number 1 on the list.
Getting a contractor to redo an installation because of the creak or unlevel tub would be difficult, maybe impossible. For him it would be like starting from scratch in the sense that the tiles would have to be replaced along with the backerboard to do it properly. It is possible that removing the first row of tiles might allow the tub to be removed and reinstalled. The Hardiboard would still need to be cut at the bottom where it overhangs the tub lip to free the tub. Still alot of work but you would not have to buy all new tiles, just the first row's worth.
If you try my WD40 fix and it works, keep in mind that you may have to spray again at some point in the future, maybe in several months or a year.
If you decide to go to court, you should not only complain of the squeak but also the unlevel tub, which does not conform to a professional installation.
Was your contractor licensed? If not, he may be violating the law. Does he have liability insurance and worker's comp for his employee? If not, this may also be a violation of law. Can you complain to a licensing board? (assuming he has a license). Does replacing the tub require a permit? Probably not, but if so, did he get one? The whole idea is for you to be more of a nuisance to him than the actual fix, which as I mentioned will be time consuming and unprofitable from his perspective.
Good luck.
 
  #21  
Old 12-29-09, 11:43 AM
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Either nails or deckmate screws could cause noise, right? He used deckmate screws instead of nails as the manual implicitly suggested nails for wood stud and screws for steel stud.

I understand the noise could travel. But wouldn't I hear the noise from the back first then the bottom. It always seems like the noise starts from the bottom where the foot is and perhaps the back. And if my foot is on the the right of the tub. I hear the noise from the bottom where my foot is. Then if I around on the left, the noise is from the bottom left where my foot is. Or middle of the tub. It always feel like it starts from the bottom. The noise must travel very fast that it gives me wrong impression where the noise really starts.

thanks.
 
  #22  
Old 12-29-09, 02:48 PM
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Screws could just as easily cause the creak as nails. Since you have metal studs, which I was unaware of, the tub rubbing against a stud and making noise is even more likely. Still you seem to think it is at the apron. If you feel adventurous remove the grout or caulk from the front of the tub (the long side) and saturate the area with WD 40. If the creak comes from there it will cease. The you can remove two floor tiles at the ends and apply shims as a more permanent solution.
I have nothing further to add. I don't think a more definitive solution is possible using this forum as a diagnostic tool.
 
  #23  
Old 12-30-09, 06:58 AM
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OK. I know what you mean. Sorry for too many questions. Thanks for all the info/help.

Also, sorry if I confuse you. It is a wooden stud but the contractor uses deckmate screws instead of nails, which is opposite to what the manual says.
 
  #24  
Old 02-24-10, 07:17 AM
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Chris - Did you solve your creeking problem?

I have a similar problem but I wonder if it's due to the floor. I hear the creek when I step near the drain of the tub and also occasionally when I enter the bathroom. When I enter the bathroom, I step about 2 feet from the tub and in line with the tub drain.

I wonder if the floor is moving and the creek might be the drain pipe rubbing against the subfloor. The floor is tiled (excellent condition and house is only 5 years old).

Should the tub bottom be resting on the subfloor? Seems to me like there may be too much give near the drain - almost as if the bottom of the tub is not resting on anything.

Thanks
 
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Old 02-24-10, 09:23 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore County Maryland
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Originally Posted by Lambster View Post
Chris - Did you solve your creeking problem?

I have a similar problem but I wonder if it's due to the floor. I hear the creek when I step near the drain of the tub and also occasionally when I enter the bathroom. When I enter the bathroom, I step about 2 feet from the tub and in line with the tub drain.

I wonder if the floor is moving and the creek might be the drain pipe rubbing against the subfloor. The floor is tiled (excellent condition and house is only 5 years old).

Should the tub bottom be resting on the subfloor? Seems to me like there may be too much give near the drain - almost as if the bottom of the tub is not resting on anything.

Thanks
The tub bottom should be resting on the floor, if the little legs on the bottom don't meet they should be shimmed.

If too much wood was cut for the tub drain that could cause creaking.
 
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