Funny Water Taste/Smell after replacing facet stems

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Old 11-01-10, 01:13 AM
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Funny Water Taste/Smell after replacing facet stems

Hi...I just had renovations done in my bathrooms and kitchen and while re-installing the main bathroom Price Pfister faucet, I started to get a drip. I did some online research, which suggested checking the cold water stem washer...sure enough it was in pretty bad shape. Unfortunately, no one sells only the washer, so I had to buy a whole new stem...I decided to replace both the hot and cold water stems, just in case. All this went fine and the drip stopped, but now the water (both hot and cold) have a bad smell and taste when I first turn on the water. If I let the water run for a bit (say 15 seconds) the smell and taste go away, but it comes back again later.

Does anyone know it this is "normal" when replacing stems? Will it eventually stop or is this a permanent problem? Is there anything to do to permanently get rid of the smell/taste more quickly than just waiting? Maybe the stems were faulty? They are made by Danco, sold at Home Depot.

Thanks for any advice or help anyone can provide!
 
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Old 11-01-10, 04:51 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Did the renovations involve replacing supply pipe? Is the new supply pipe CPVC? Does the smell/taste resemble CPVC glue (I know you don't sniff it or drink it, but it has a particular smell)? If so, the smell/taste will go away as soon as the water has run over the joints enough...probably a week or so.
 
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Old 11-01-10, 09:53 AM
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Hi...yes, I had already replaced the supply lines...installed new metal compression hoses in place of the old copper pipes. Because they're compression fittings, I didn't use any pipe dope, putty, tape, etc...not necessary or recommended. could it be leftover gunk from the original install of the rigid copper? I can remove the new supply hoses (which I've never had problems with in my other rooms - bath and kitchen) and clean the threads on the supply line...I already cleaned up the faucet side when I removed it from the old sink, pre-renovation.

Should I be using some kind of solvent to make sure everything is off? I never had this problem when replacing my powder room or kitchen sink rigid copper pipes with the new metal supply hoses. The main bathroom is the only place I've replaced the stem.
 
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Old 11-02-10, 06:41 PM
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I'm doing a test...I bought new supply lines of a different brand than I currently have on the problem faucet...this brand is one that I have in another faucet without the problem. I swapped out the cold water hose (the original is a little smelly, so that might be the issue) and will check the water from both lines later to see if the problem still exists. If it's gone on the cold water side, then I know it's the supply line, if the problem still exists on both sides, it's got to be the new faucet stems, in which case I'll have to replace the faucet. I hope it's the supply lines!
 
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Old 11-03-10, 02:51 AM
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Ok, the new flexible supply line on the cold water made the water taste worse! So my next idea was to take an old flexible supply line that has yet to be reattached to my kitchen sink and use that for the cold water. Now I will know if it's definitely the hose or the stem.

Does anyone know if new flexible metal supply compression hoses have some kind of coating inside or something that just needs to flush out over time?
 
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Old 11-17-10, 10:03 AM
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If anyone is interested...I wound up replacing the faucet because after replacing the stems, it eventually began to leak from the faucet handle, so I concluded the faucet was kaput. I was lucky enough to find a new Delta faucet that closely resembled the Price Pfister (swiveling gooseneck spout and porcelain handles) and I installed that with a new set of steel flexible hoses (same brand I have in my powder room). Well, initially, the bad taste/smell was worse, but it too, would go away if I let the water run for 15-20 seconds first. I've been religiously flushing the lines for a little over a week and it appears as if the bad taste/smell is going away when first turned on. There must be a coating in new supply lines and faucets that cause this initial bad odor and taste because I also noticed it on the new Delta faucet I just installed in the kitchen. I will be doing the same flushing to see if that works to remove the taste/smell.

They should warn you in the installation instructions that this could happen and that you should flush the new system routinely to eliminate it.
 
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Old 11-17-10, 04:05 PM
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Glad you were able to locate the culprit. Generally it's sort of like buying a new car. It smells new......for a while, then it smells like, well whatever is in it. New stuff smells, but it all goes away eventually. I just finished a bath remodel for a client, new shower unit. New piping. It smelled like cpvc glue for about 30 minutes, and I am sure it will take a while for it to completely dissipate. Sez la vie.
 
 

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