questions on setting toilet

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-21-11, 09:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
questions on setting toilet

about to set toilet and several questions.

when I was putting the short piece of pvc into the flange, I pushed down assuming the flange was tapered inside and the pipe would bottom. but it didn't and came out on side where wax ring will go. I tried to clean it off as best I could but wondered whether this will affect the seal? should I just get new one? some pics.







now about supply. I have cpvc coming up through floor. I got cpvc 1/4 turn valve. part glues to pipe and has threads on it. the valve then connects to this. so the valve could be replaced without having to cut cpvc. so how long do I leave the pipe coming out of floor before adding the valve? I am tempted to cut it real low since the valve can still be replaced. if I cut it high, how do you hide that ugly cpvc that has primer on it? just paint it? couldn't find any "covers" for the cpvc.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-21-11, 10:03 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,733
Likes Received: 3
The wax actually is intalled where it says oatey on the flange and not the recessed part where the pipe is. Its OK

Cut the cpvc as you like. If you do cut low though and there is a problen the the joint close to the floor repair may be more difficult since you may need to replace the section that is below the floor.

I guess you can paint cpvc.

Mike NJ
 
  #3  
Old 03-05-11, 11:18 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
hopefully tomorrow I can get baseboard up and set toilet. I tested it today (no was ring yet) and there is slight rock when I set it it place. I guess the tile isn't exactly level. Someone told me to roll up plumbers putty till like long rope and put around the bottom of bowl and that would take up the space and keep from rocking. but when I read back of the putty, it said not to be used with various materials and ceramic was listed. porcelain was not specifically listed. tile is porcelain and I assume toilet is as well so not sure if the putty can be used for this? what should I use to stabilize the bowl? asked at lowes and they pointed me to GE silicone II for kitchen/bath/plumbing. that seems too compressable to help stabilize. it will seal it, but I don't think it will stabilize.
 
  #4  
Old 03-06-11, 07:54 AM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,733
Likes Received: 3
Set the bowl in plaster. I never used a shim.

This is the best instruction I can find. You only need to put the plaster around the outline of the bowl. I dont know why this guy is smearing it all over the place. Plus after you set the toilet, just score around the bowl with the putty knife. When the excess plaster drys it will come up easy.

Rock Solid Toilet Bowl Installation


Mike NJ
 
  #5  
Old 03-06-11, 08:40 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
I actuallly have some gypsolite plaster that is to be used to set the jacuzzi tub. was hoping something that just went on in caulk like form and then hardened. but now I have some more questions. what is correct height of flange? the guy that set my tile said that plumbers like the flange to sit over the tile. he said if it is flush with the tile, then they often have to use larger wax ring? so he cut out just very little around the drain and I then cut out around mounting holes and mounted flange so it is sitting on tile. the picture in the link shows the flange flush with tile. did I do it wrong?
also, he mentions about getting tank even with wall. should I put on tank before set bowl so I can better position bowl so tank in even with wall? or is there a little wiggle room in installing tank so that I can make it even with wall, even if my bowl is slightly off?
 
  #6  
Old 03-06-11, 04:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 1,058
Likes Received: 2
If the flange is level or below the tile, I always then use a plastic flange extender. BTW, what a neat trick of using plaster of Paris rather than shims.
 
  #7  
Old 03-06-11, 05:53 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
I happen to have another flange, so I turned bowl upside down and put flange on it the way I have it set up (with flange on top of tile-so bottom of flange is even with the bottom of bowl) I would think the way I did it is better than having top of flange flush with tile. the way I did it, the toilet has little lip that extends down into the flange. so the wax ring has less work to do-all the liquids and solids and more likely to just go down drain and less likely to leak out. I would think this is the way it is meant to be?
 
  #8  
Old 03-07-11, 04:05 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
I don't know, hammerash, my nephew just remodeled his basement and waited until the bath was tiled to cut his 4" stand off to install his flange. The flange stuck above the tile, but sat flat on it, and the toilet will not sit on it without rocking. Now, it may be the toilet having too low an outlet, but he will have to make accommodations for that when he installs it.
 
  #9  
Old 03-15-11, 08:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
well guys, tried the plaster setup. didn't go well at all. i set the toilet in it, but it was way off level side to side. by 1degree-which translates into nearly 1/4" from side to side of bowl! but it was bottomed out on high side. so--I pulled it back out and cleaned it all up. thought maybe i just didn't let plaster thicken up at all. so waited. then tried again. same result. I guess the plaster never hardened. in my bucket, after about 2 hours, it was still easily compressable and not hard at all. it was lumpy. never got warm. so called national gypsum today-I had used gypsolite plaster. he said that is not good to use for toilet (or tub, which is what my plumbers had bought it for) said water soluble and if gets wet will dissolve. i told him that jacuzzi suggests plaster as one substance that can be used to set the tub. he said portland cement plaster? the jacuzzi manual says plaster, morter, floor leveling compound or foam (having certian density). so i asked guy what is portland cement plaster-is that morter? he kinda confused me. I looked it up. I guess it is stucco.

so anyway, I guess my plaster was bad--it may be two years old sitting in unopened bag in my basement. but I did have concerns like this guy did that if it gets wet, it will just dissolve. so wanted to see what you guys thought? think something like thin set would be better? would it stick to the porcelain tile at all? would it come off later if change toilet?

addendum: called jacuzzi. they mean portland cement plaster-stucco. NOT gypsum plaster. to me, plaster alway meant plaster of paris or gypsum plaster. they said that once tub is in place, it will be hard to get out.
 
  #10  
Old 03-21-11, 07:56 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
well I took bowl, put it on my LEVEL subfloor and the rim of bowl was off by 1degree (1/4"). rotated the bowl 180 and the low side rotated too. so it is the bowl! in the 12" across the rim, it is off by 1/4". that seems excessive to me. I called Gerber, they said shim it. The place where I bought it said that is normal in trade and it should just be shimmed. That seems crazy to me. both of my exisiting toilets are very close to level with no shims. I thought the purpose of shims was to correct for uneven floor, not to correct manufacturing defects. do you think this is normal manufacturing tolerance? my tank will be off by even more and when I put shelves in it will be very noticeable.
 
  #11  
Old 03-21-11, 09:25 AM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,733
Likes Received: 3
First off the flange should fit ontop of finished floor.

Second, dry fit the toilet and see where it sits level. It may rock but thats where the "Plaster of Paris" comes in. Dont use nothing else.

Draw a line around the bowl, then remove bowl.

Put your wax seal on and johnny bolts.

That line on the floor you made is were you are going to put the plaster.

How to mix plaster. Get a coffee can and fill 1/3 with water. Then pour in plaser a little at a time. Mix and keep adding until it like a spackle consistency. Then spread on the line in a bead like fashion with your putty knife.

Build up the part of the bowl that had the bigger gap with extra plaster. Because the plaster is kindof thick it can be built up.

Set toilet on wax seal. The base of the bowl will also set in the plaster bead you ran along the line.

Make sure toilet is square and kind of sit on the toilet to make sure the wax gets pressed. and tighten bolts.

Snug bolts evenly.

Take putty knife edge and score the plaster around the bowl perimeter.

Dont touch until the plaster dries. 1 hour possibly less. Snug the bolts here and there as the plaster is drying. The wax gets softer and you will be able to snug them more. Not too tight. Dont break the bowl.

After plaster is dry just use the putty knife to scrape the plaster from arould the bowl. You have to of scored it. It will come off in one or two long pieces.

Then do all the tank fitting.

I hope you understand this, in how I explained it.

Mike NJ
 
  #12  
Old 03-21-11, 12:38 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
well that is what I basically did-twice! but the weight of the bowl simply compressed the plaster and the bowl was on floor. the plaster was not able to hold the weight. like I said, after 2 hours it was still not firm at all. it did harden the next day. bad plaster? maybe, it was old but unopened and sitting in basement (no water in floor and it is conditioned area).

but question now, is this normal for a new bowl to be off by this much? I spoke to someone who has set 100 or so toilets and he said no. said he has never had to use more than one maybe two washers (1/16" to 1/8") MAX. The plaster seems like good idea for correcting small irregularities in floor or bowl. But this seems defective to me. and the side that is low and will have to be raised 1/4" is the side that you look right at. I think it will look awful. trying to get them to exchange it, but wanted some thoughts on whether this is normal.
 
  #13  
Old 03-21-11, 12:54 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,733
Likes Received: 3
the weight of the bowl simply compressed the plaster and the bowl was on floor. the plaster was not able to hold the weight.
LOL... Its supposed to do that... But if there ar any gaps from the bowl or floor not being true the plaster will fill them. And of course if the toilet rocks you will have a gap on one side or the other.

but question now, is this normal for a new bowl to be off by this much?
Ceramic pieces do not normally plane true, so they will rock and roll a bit. This is because of the way they shrink and warp slightly in the fireing.

To prove its not your floor, put the toilet on other floors in your home to compare.

The plaster seems like good idea for correcting small irregularities in floor or bowl. But this seems defective to me. and the side that is low and will have to be raised 1/4" is the side that you look right at. I think it will look awful. trying to get them to exchange it, but wanted some thoughts on whether this is normal.
I dont think you are understanding the concept. That 1/4" will be filled by the plaster.

I will try to find other videos or I will take a pic of my own toilets.


Did you read the link I posted several posts ago????????

Mike NJ
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 03-21-11 at 01:25 PM.
  #14  
Old 03-21-11, 01:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
I completely understand concept. I don't think you understand what I am saying. so one side has to come up 1/4" for it to be level. so I put down plaster 1/2" thick lets say. then put bowl down and keeping it level, I compress the wax ring. so the high side is now bottomed against the floor. the low side is 1/4" off the floor, and the bowl is level. now i let it go and weight of bowl compresses the plaster and bottom of bowl completely on floor and now rim of bowl out of level. the plaster has to be able to support the weight of the toilet. I am not talking about filling gap to keep from rocking.

read one of previous posts. It is NOT my floor. I took it out and put it on my LEVEL subfloor (determined with a digital level). now put bowl down on it. not level, off by 1/4". lets say put "x" to mark the side that is low. turn bowl around 180 degrees. the same side, marked with "x" is still low. if it was floor that was problem, the side that was low would now be high. you understand?


photo of my plaster in place ready for bowl.

now if they give me problem with returning, maybe I can use this. look at the lines around the mounting hole. looks like crack waiting to happen. what do you think.


 
  #15  
Old 03-21-11, 01:38 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,733
Likes Received: 3
OK... The high side should get the johnny bolt first. Snug the bolt so the toilet dont fall to the low side. Thats how I do it. Then just hand tighten the low side bolt.

Score the plaster around the perimeter and let dry. 20 minutes. Then scrap up excess. Should come right up.

As far as the plaster in your pic, you only need a two inch bead around the perimeter. Like where you have that white paper. You do not need any in the middle. If you look under the toilet it does not touch the floor anywhere except the perimeter. Some toilets have added tabs front and rear but I dont add plaster there.

Ceramic pieces do not normally plane true, so they will rock and roll a bit. This is because of the way they shrink and warp slightly in the fireing.


Where he says to use finger, I use putty knife.
How to install a toilet | Cincinnati Plumbers, Cincinnati Plumbing Company


Mike NJ
 
  #16  
Old 03-21-11, 02:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,452
Likes Received: 12
Setting toilets in plaster must be an east coast thing as I have never seen it. While it is true that china will often not "plane true" during and after the firing there is truth that some manufacturers have less quality control than do others. I have heard many horror stories of people that purchase toilets at the big box mega-mart homecenters that get toilets that have severe manufacturing defects. There really IS a reason why they sell so much cheaper than a plumbing supply company.

I just had a local plumbing company replace a crappy (pun intended ) toilet in my sister's new (to her) house. I specified a Toto toilet (largest maker of toilets in the world) and the plumber set it with no problems of rocking or unevenness. He did use what he called a water soluble caulking compound to seal the toilet to the floor along the front and sides but NOT along the back. He applied the caulk AFTER securing the toilet to the floor and explained that it was to prevent urine from "missed shots" and mop water from going under the toilet but leaving the back uncaulked would allow any leaks of the wax seal to become immediately obvious.

Now as to your situation...I have read that uneven and rocking toilets is not uncommon and that wedging the low side (usually with plastic wedges) is often done. The wedges are then cut flush with the toilet after securing the bolts and then a bead of white caulk (silicone?) is run around the toilet base as I previously described and this hides the wedge and fills the gap.
 
  #17  
Old 03-23-11, 12:14 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
couple things.
lawrosa, thanks for trying, but that won't work either. that would work if the problem was that the bowl rock left to right. I could tighten down the one side to keep it level as plaster dried. but it sits on my flat floor without rocking--but is 1/4" high on one side. so I have to actually lift it up-and the undried plaster just can't support the weight. the way I did before (see previous post) when I said I positioned it and then let it go, the high side was on floor and the low side was up to make level. then let it go-the high side did not come off floor but weight made low side go to floor as well and then bowl not level. so putting bolt on high side would have no effect. my dad said to use stainless washers underneath and put them in plumbers putty to keep from moving. could combine that with plaster-the washers could support it till plaster dried. then once dry, the weight would be distributed better than just having two load points (the two stacks of washers) on the one side.

this is not a cheap home depot toilet. this is a gerber bought at local plumbing supply house. but this has shown me something-you just can't beat the return policies of HD and Lowes! this place is giving me a hard time. they say this is normal, plumbers deal with this all the time. I said fine, then let me bring this one back and get one that is level. I have all the boxes and packing materials. If a plumber doesn't mind, then give him this one. They said they have to return it to gerber and then gerber has to decide if defective and if they decide not defective then I don't get refunded. (he didn't say but I surely would have to get that "non-defective" toilet back?) so before i would proceed, I basically have to get gerber to say it is defective and they would take back. at home depot, they would just take it back no questions asked and rtv it (return to vendor). I bought from local supply place because I needed 14" rough in and neither HD or Lowes have them in stock.

as far as using shims-I had purchased them. but them are so steep angled that I didn't like that set up at all. I like the flat washer idea better.

but what about the slight surface cracks on my picture near the bolt hole on one side? think this is complete crack just waiting to happen? and is being 1/4" out of level when sitting on level floor with no rocking NORMAL? I know there are irregularities, but this is not a slight imperfection in my book.
 
  #18  
Old 03-23-11, 01:41 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,452
Likes Received: 12
When you set the toilet on the floor and then sit on the toilet can you determine that the toilet is not parallel to the floor? Does it "sit" strangely? Do you feel like you are listing toward the low side?

Or are you just concerned that the top of the toilet isn't level according to the spirit level you placed across the opening? While in a perfect world it would be nice if all floors were perfectly level and all "seats" were also perfectly level (or at least parallel to the floor) we just don't live in a perfect world. I would be far more concerned about the toilet rocking (which you state it does not) than whether or not it was absolutely level.

I'm not a plumber but I have set a few toilets and I never used a level on one. I've never seen a plumber use a level on a toilet either. I have seen toilets that were shimmed to eliminate rocking when set on uneven floors.
 
  #19  
Old 03-23-11, 01:54 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,733
Likes Received: 3
lawrosa, thanks for trying, but that won't work either. that would work if the problem was that the bowl rock left to right. I could tighten down the one side to keep it level as plaster dried. but it sits on my flat floor without rocking--but is 1/4" high on one side. so I have to actually lift it up-and the undried plaster just can't support the weight. the way I did before (see previous post) when I said I positioned it and then let it go, the high side was on floor and the low side was up to make level. then let it go-the high side did not come off floor but weight made low side go to floor as well and then bowl not level.
Not really making sense. When you tighten the bolts it should pull to the floor where it contacts and not drop. Does not matter front to back-side to side.

But if you say so. I tried to help. I have set toilets that were 1" off the floor.

Just use plastic shimms then and be done with it. They sell them at the home stores. Like I said 1/4 is nothing.

Gerber is the cheapest supply house toilet. They are lower quality. We use them as are basic installs. AS/toto/kohler are the high end.

Good luck.

Mike NJ
 
  #20  
Old 03-23-11, 01:59 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,452
Likes Received: 12
Gerber are worse than Mansfield? My sister's house had all Mansfield and I gotta say they were about the "crappiest" toilet I ever saw. The plumber who replaced one of them with a Toto said Mansfield were terrible and that he rarely goes a single day without replacing at least one Mansfield.
 
  #21  
Old 03-23-11, 05:41 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
wish I had known that gerber was such crap. unfortunately noone had anything else in 14" rough in.

furd-never got to put seat on to actually sit on toilet. but it is obvious to me that is is crooked when sitting on floor. and tank will be crooked also-which is very obvious if you put something on it or put shelf above it (which I intend to do). I suppose you can "cheat" the tank some--1/4" though seems like a lot.
you said you never use level, so you don't know if they are level or not? if there is tile behind toilet or shelf, it should be obvious if it is not level. But if there isn't some reference, it may be difficult to know. some people have better eye for "level" , "straight", "even", etc. than others. I happen to be one of those who can tell pretty well. If you are setting it for someone else and they don't care-great. If you are doing for yourself and you have good eye and do care-problem. My dad worked in maintenace for 25 years and has set many toilets. He did use level (I guess that is where I get it from!) and said he NEVER had a toilet off by 1/4" when sitting on level floor. He said he had to sometimes use a washer (about 1/16") to get level and occasionally 2 (1/8"), but never more. I need 4 to get mine level. That seems excessive. heck, I look at my current toilets which I assume were set by the previous owner and knowing the kind of work he did elsewhere, he was not concerned with the quality of his work, or codes either. yet both of those toilets are level and it doesn't look like there are any washers or shims. so you guys are probably right in saying gerber is junk.

I guess we just are not on same page lawrosa. I know that what you describe will NOT work in this case. imagine a 2x10 laying flat on the floor. you want to get one side off the floor by 1/4". can you do so by standing on the other side applying downward force (like a johnny bolt)? I can't . if you stand on very edge and apply slight sideways force you may be able to flip board up, but the bolts are just pulling straight down. unless you put something underneath to serve as pivot, tightening down one bolt on the side that is already on the floor is not going to raise the other . the wax ring could serve such a purpose as pivot, the problem is that it is way in back and the weight of the toilet is way in front. so the toilet front just doesn't lift up. believe me, I tried like I said before.

you set a toilet that was off by 1"?? or are you saying the FLOOR was off that much and you had to level toilet? that is different if you are compensating for others poor work. this is brand new construction with a level floor. and was it off front to back or left to right? since the distance front to back is more than double the distance front left to right (in my toilet anyway), a 1" difference left to right would create a much greater angle than a 1" difference front to back. and that is the truely important thing is the angle in trying to compare how far off. my 1degree off translates into about 1/4" for the rim. But across the width of the tank, that same 1 degree is over 3/8" since the tank is much wider. so even though 1 degree may not seem like much, as you can see, it is a good bit and gets more noticeable the longer distance you carry it out.

just been on hold for gerber for over 30min and got tired of waiting so hung up. trying to get rid of this toilet. this just doesn't meet my standards if that is the best quality control they have. I know furd follows electrical forums also and you may have seen some of my work there. I redid the work the electrician did on my main panel. it was so bad the cover didn't fit on panel and then he used sheet metal screws to try to put it on, ruining the threads on the panel. so I just don't tolerate sh---y work or poor quality. so, in trying to get rid of the toilet, if they say that the 1/4" is normal, think I have case with the fracture lines near bolt hole? the top is normal so this is not from me. just seems like crack waiting to happen.

sorry so long but I think we are about at dead end here. I'll try to post back after speak with gerber.
 
  #22  
Old 03-23-11, 08:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,452
Likes Received: 12
As I stated I am not a plumber so my experience is limited. You did pique my curiosity though so I did put a level on my toilet and it is off-level by maybe 1/16 to 3/32 of an inch across the bowl. I didn't check the floor so maybe it is really the floor that isn't level. I've never set a toilet in a bathroom with tile walls and I also know that the grout lines in tile are often not "level" or even parallel with the floor. Maybe the tile setter was related to the lousy electrician who worked on your house.

I HAVE seen some really shoddy "workmanship" in regard to just about any kind of work and that applies across the board in residential, commercial and industrial buildings. I've seen water heater installations that I would have been ashamed to admit were mine, doors installed crooked and electrical that I wouldn't turn on the power until I re-did it. Poor workmanship is probably the number one reason why I so often "Do It Myself" as I hate paying someone $40, $60, $70 an hour (or more) and get a job no better than I could do myself and all too often worse than I would do myself.

So, I don't know what to tell you. I think that trying to get your money back for this toilet is a good idea but if that fails I would be tempted to use the shims to set the toilet level AND use the plaster to provide a solid base. Place the plaster away from the shims and let it harden, remove the shims and add fresh plaster where the shims had been. Done carefully (as I know you would do) you should be able to get a good result that few would see even if they got down on their hands and knees to inspect, something that I'm quite sure few guests in your house will ever do. We DIYers ALWAYS see our own mistakes and errors but it is really seldom that anyone else sees them even if we point them out.
 
  #23  
Old 03-27-11, 12:22 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Likes Received: 1
How to Install a Toilet

Haven't used them yet... but I'll be setting a toilet on a floor shortly that is not level. I know I'll need shims... I'm thinking that you could stick some plastic shims to support the terlet until the plaster cures... then pull the shims if you wish and thumb some plaster in where the shims were.

Nor have I used one of these, but am planning to try one on this install:

Fernco Wax Free Toilet Seal, Toilet Seal, Toilet Bowl Seal, Wax Free Toilet Bowl Gasket | Fernco
 

Last edited by NJT; 03-27-11 at 01:03 PM.
  #24  
Old 03-27-11, 01:25 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,452
Likes Received: 12
Trooper, I have a Fluidmaster version of the waxless seal that I have had around for about ten years. I had it at my sister's house when I had a professional (and competent) plumber install a new toilet. (I didn't want to have to schlep the new toilet upstairs and the old toilet down and still have to get rid of the old toilet. )

I asked the plumber about the Fluidmaster unit and he said they often used them with cast iron plumbing but not with plastic. He said that his biggest objection with the Fluidmaster was the thinness of the gasket where it went on the "horn" of the toilet but otherwise they seemed okay.

Understand that the waxless seal MUST be slightly elevated when you set the toilet on it, if you even slightly touch it with the toiler and then lift the toilet you must remove the toilet and raise the waxless unit again before re-setting the toilet.
 
  #25  
Old 03-27-11, 02:37 PM
NJT's Avatar
NJT
NJT is offline
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 23,539
Likes Received: 1
The no wax seal is attractive to me because the floor joists upstairs aren't quite what they should be... and they do flex a bit... my thinking was that this design would be very forgiving to flexing that would kill a wax seal. Downstairs terlet went through a couple wax seals from flexing... and I eventually replaced it with a neoprene seal that has been fine now for about ten years.

Don't wanna hijack OP's thread though...
 
  #26  
Old 03-27-11, 06:13 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 17,733
Likes Received: 3
Its illegal in Jersey to use these...LOL...But I am serious.

Nor have I used one of these, but am planning to try one on this install:
Fernco Wax Free Toilet Seal, Toilet Seal, Toilet Bowl Seal, Wax Free Toilet Bowl Gasket | Fernco
 
  #27  
Old 04-06-11, 06:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,153
to update. I was able to exchange the toilet bowl. but the new one was the same way-tilted the exact same amount in the same direction. after calling gerber, they said that their rep was going to be in the area next day. so he went to place I bought my toilet and looked at their supply. he brought one to my house. I showed him how bad the one I had was. the one he brought was MUCH better-was only off by less than half of what the other two were. So I kept it. when he was leaving, I offered to pack up old one since I still had everything. he said keep it. I would consider using in my downstairs bathroom, but it is smaller and they screwed up there and had rough in at like 17" or so! they didn't calculate the finished wall location because of some old concrete. other guys put in offset flange to get me to 15". but this elongated bowl will be too close to other wall.

installed new one. used the plaster routine after putting down some washers to hold the toilet where I wanted it till plaster dried. got new plaster and it hardened in about 1/2 hour. everything seems good. toilet level. not sure how tight is tight enough on bolts. everyone says don't overtighten so I am being so cautious that they probably are not tight enough.

one quick question. in back of bowl in the center hole where tank connects, there are two little "divots" where the porcelain is not right. the are gray craters. the rep barely looked and said that is fine. looks like water will just sit in them after flush. I was going to put a little water in them to make sure it doesn't leak out anywhere. wondered about throwing some epoxy in them? can take pics if wanted.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes