Ice Maker Line/ Water Pressure to Sink

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Old 03-01-11, 06:47 AM
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Ice Maker Line/ Water Pressure to Sink

Hi all. I have a plumbing questin (obviously). Hoping it is a stupid question with an easy answer! Our fridge busted and I picked up a new one yesterday. Old fridge came with the house and was pretty old. Both the old one and the new one have ice makers. Before I disconnected the copper line to the old ice maker I turned off the water to the icemaker line. At least I think I did... Turned the valve where the copper ice maker line under the sink connects to the cold water supply all the way clockwise. Unplugged the old ice maker and moved the old fridge out. I need to go buy the right connection fitting for the new fridge, so that line is not currently hooked up to anything. It still has a fitting from the old fridge on the end. Anyway, new ice maker not yet hooked up. This morning I turn on the kitchen sink and have almost no pressure. I left it on and it eventually went down to only a trickle. I put the end of the icemaker line in a bucket and opened that icemaker valve back up. Still no water pressure in the sink. No water from the icemaker line, either, but that is probably because it still has some fitting on the end.
I don't understand why I'm getting no pressure at all (hot or cold). We have a single handle faucet type... Either way, I only touched the icemaker valve, which is only connected to the cold water line. I didn't touch anything with the hot water line. Is it possible that with the icemaker line not connected to anything it is messing up getting any pressure to the single handle faucet? And when I connect the line to the new icemaker it could magically start working? Otherwise I have no idea. Here is a pic I snapped this morning:



The valve circled in blue is the only think I touched. Turned it clockwise to close it when I first disconnected the line from the old fridge. The other valves look to be just hot water up to sink, cold water up to sink, and hot water to dishwasher. Any thoughts? Does it make sense that I would get no pressure until I hook that icemaker line up to something?

Second, easier question. Can I just buy some sort of compression nut to connect the copper line to the new fridge? Can you buy a pack of them for all different models? I know I can buy a whole new ice maker line kit with plastic tubing and connections for $15 or so, but I'd like to just keep the copper. It is a Whirlpool fridge. Would they all have the same connection type?

Thanks for any help. Sorry if these are stupid questions. Also, I tried searching this forum, but for whatever reason I could't get the spam question to work... So sorry if this has been addressed before!
 
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Old 03-01-11, 07:12 AM
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I cannot see the pic too small.

Remove the aerator from the faucet. Its probably clogged with washer debris from the valve. As far as ice maker the new units need a full port 1/4" valve. If a saddle valve NG, but I cant see the pic.
Let us know whats in the aerator.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 03-01-11, 10:35 AM
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Thanks for the response. That makes sense as far as it getting clogged. It'll take it apart first thing when I get home.

The water line ran now for the ice maker looks like it was just one of those kits with a small diamater (1/4" guessing) copper piping and was installed directly on the cold water line with a saddle valve. I have no idea when it was installed. Will that supply enough water to the newer fridges? Or would I be better off removing that saddle valve and putting a splitter on there to get more pressure to the line to the fridge? Here is (hopefully) a bigger pic:



If I had to go that route, looks like cutting the pipe right there where the saddle valve is now, and installing a pushfit type splitter right there (no soldering). Then connect the cold water line from the faucet directly to one end, and connect the ice maker line to the other side with compression fitting. Would that be necessary or overkill? Of course the shutoff valve is currently between the saddle valve and the line from the faucet. I'd have to work in a coldwater shutoff somehow. If I had to go that route. Do they make a splitter that has shutoffs on both the outflow ends? Ideally something I could just push on the existing cold water line that would tee off, with both sides of the tee having shutoff valves... one for the faucet and one for the ice maker line.
 

Last edited by tyks1; 03-01-11 at 11:23 AM.
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Old 03-01-11, 11:34 AM
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Will that supply enough water to the newer fridges? Or would I be better off removing that saddle valve and putting a splitter on there for a bigger diamater line to the fridge?
Ugg, I hate when plumbers install saddle valves. And right where it comes out of the cabinet. If you cant solder I would do this.

Yes the new refridges require a full 1/4 valve. If not I have the seloniods fail.

1. Turn off water to house and open outside faucet, downstairs faucet, or something lower then the copper line coming up through the cabinet. Turn off hot water heater supply also. You may get cross over.
2. Remove saddle valve and cut the pipe right at the hole where the saddle valve pierced the pipe.
3. Then use a 1/2x1/2x1/2 shark bite tee. Make sure it inserts in the pipe all the way. They go in pretty far. This is critical. Then stick short lengths of copper in the other ends.
4. Then get two sharkbite valves. 1/2 x 1/4 for ice maker and 1/2x3/8 for the faucet.

You can use compression also. If so use teflon paste on the ferrules.

Turn everything back on and test for leaks.

Good luck

Mike NJ
 
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Old 03-02-11, 08:35 AM
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Got the faucet working again... it was some sort of clog. Of course it couldn't be in the screen right at the end. We have a single handle faucet with pullout hose. Ended up having to take the whole faucet apart and the major clog was at the base of the faucet where the water runs down into where the hose connects. Got all the screens and hose cleaned and it works better than ever. Thanks for the suggestion on that.

Headed to the parts store today to get the fitting to attach the water line to the back of the frige. Hopefully they'll have what I need to open up the connection from the main line to get more pressure to the fridge. I've seen some people talk about removing the saddle valve, drilling an actual 1/4" hole in the pipe where the existing hold is, and putting another type of saddle valve in the same spot. Would that end up being more problematic down the road?
 
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Old 03-02-11, 09:49 AM
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putting another type of saddle valve in the same spot. Would that end up being more problematic down the road?
Sure I guess you can do it. Saddle valves are not to code here in NJ and most plumbers frown upon them.

Mike NJ
 
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