Building a new shower, Pan, Walls, everything.

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-11-13, 07:19 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Building a new shower, Pan, Walls, everything.

Hi All,

We have just bought a new (to us) home. The master bath is downstairs and I want to remodel it pretty much completlly. Currently it has a cheap plastic shower/tub setup. You know the $500 ones from Lowes/Menards. The tub and three walls are plastic, look terrible and you can feel the bottom of the tub move as you stand in it. I want to replace all of that with a walkin shower with tiled walls etc.

I'm in the planning stage right now. I plan on tearing everything in the bathtub area down to studs and starting from scratch. I have never created a shower pan from scratch and will have many questions.

The tub area is 30" x 58". I want to build a shower pan to that size. I've read a lot about building the pre-slope, laying in the liner and pouring the floor for tile but can't figure out exactly how much sand and Portland I will need. It is a right hand drain so I'll need 1-1/4 drop from the left wall total correct? Any ideas/suggestions on how much mud I'll need total? Actually mixing the mud? About how much water to use? I know you want it kind of like wet sand, but I don't want to start with too much water and end up with soup.

This is my first attempt of a project of this type so any tips, tricks and suggestions would be great.

Thanks,

George
 

Last edited by georgetaylor1; 02-11-13 at 07:46 PM.
  #2  
Old 02-12-13, 04:15 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Hey, George, welcome to the forums! Let me refer you to an excellent site that will give perfect details on how to pack in (not pour) a shower pan. Virtually bullet proof. How to build a shower - Building a shower pan with pre-sloped mortar bed, liner and curb. Oh, I congratulate you on wanting to do this project, as I am called upon to offer the same advice, and what you are suggesting is what I come up with and my clients are extremely satisfied. I know you won't have the room for it, since you are replacing a tub/shower, but I never build shower enclosures that require doors or curtains. Always a walk in with controls on walls that prevent splash out.

NOW, one problem you will encounter is the drain size. Presently you only have a 1 1/2" drain for the tub. You will need a 2" drain for the shower. The answer to that and the theory of relativity are in the same boat. I don't know. So you will need to reconfigure your drain to the larger size, and can move it more centrally located while you are at it. Do you have exposed ceiling under this room?
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-13, 07:57 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the response Chandler. That video shows pretty much exactly what I want to do. This is our downstairs (basement) bathroom. It's on the slab so has very little underneath it. I have not pulled the tub to actually look at what it has for a drain. The next room over is the laundry/Utility room which has a drain in the floor that is 2" with a 4" grate on it, exactly what I would want for a shower. If I'm lucky that is what will be under the tub. If it's only a 1-1/2" pipe is there an easy way to convert to 2" without jackhammering my basement floor? Don't think my wife would be happy with that. I will know more when I pull everything apart, but am trying to find out as much as possible before doing that.

This is my first shot at a project of this type and really don't want to get in trouble to the point of having to give up and call someone to fix it.

If I'm only a couple inches off the slab with the tub does that still give me room to lay the pan properly? To me it looks like I'd need 4" or more, which means a step up of an inch or so when stepping over the curb??

Thanks,

George
 
  #4  
Old 02-12-13, 08:20 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I like your idea of not having a curtain or door, but don't know if I could get away with that. On the plumbing end of the tub is a 17" wide wall that as far as I can tell only serves the purpose of housing the plumbing and giving separation between the toilet area and bathtub area. This could possibly give me more room to work with. I could also come out in front of where the tub is by another foot.

I've been watching some videos by Michael Mroczko of TileMaster GA that make it all look so easy. But then you guys do this for a living, I'm an EX-geek that now trains Parrots for a living, I don't have the technical expertise that you guys have.


Tanks for any insight.

George
 
  #5  
Old 02-13-13, 05:10 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Confused. How can you only be a couple of inches off the slab with the tub and it still hold water? Generally shower berms are about 4-6" above the slab. This will translate to 2-3" on the inside of the shower once the pan is packed in to allow for drainage to the middle.

I usually work with what I have as far as space goes, and expand that space if allowable. You have to take into consideration where the other appliances such as toilet and vanity are located so you can enter and exit the shower without stumbling on either.

I'm just the piano player, so don't shoot. You are lucky in one sense that you have an available 2" drain to tie into. It will entail some concrete break up, but you can do that while she is shopping or something It all covers back up with concrete mix, so it's good. Although I do it for a living, I still let my plumbers do the pipe setting. They mark the floor where they want a trough and I have my guys cut it out.

I'm an EX-geek that now trains Parrots for a living, I don't have the technical expertise that you guys have.
Your geek knowledge base will never leave you, so you'll always be one at heart. Just because you have never done it before........why do you think we're here??? We'll walk you through it step by step if necessary. We're not going anywhere.
 
  #6  
Old 02-13-13, 05:35 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I say that because the next room over is the utility room with a bare concrete floor that appears to be level with the bathroom floor. I'm thinking that is the slab with all plumbing being inside the concrete from there down. The water main comes up thru the concrete at the point. I'm going to follow the water main from the entry to the house when I get home tonight to see if that gives me more insight.
 
  #7  
Old 02-13-13, 05:45 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Sometime today, can you post a couple of pictures of what you are seeing. It is a little different and we don't want to give you any bad info. Thanks. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #8  
Old 02-13-13, 06:24 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As soon as I get home after work I will do that. I'm not that great at explaining things anymore and it's all new to me.
 
  #9  
Old 02-15-13, 08:45 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK, I'm back, got busy on a couple other things. Here's a couple pictures of what I'm looking at;

Name:  100_3876.jpg
Views: 2340
Size:  21.8 KB
This wall is 18" wide separating the bath from the toilet stall. I can't figure out why it would be so wide and would love to cut it down to 4" just to house the shower plumbing. That would give a much larger toilet stall. The back wall you see is the outside wall of the house.

Name:  100_3878.jpg
Views: 4529
Size:  18.3 KB

This is the plastic tub, you can probably tell why I want to do away with it. It's actually so then that when standing in it it bows so the water puddles at your feet, when you move it comes back up enough for the water to run to the drain.

Name:  downstairs bathroom.jpg
Views: 2682
Size:  20.0 KB
Hope this works, it's a cheap CAD drawing of the bathroom. The area next to the vanity is the utility room, it's going around the furnace at that point. There is also an open area there that I plan on putting shelving in and turning into a linen closet.

George
 
  #10  
Old 02-16-13, 04:12 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Is the toilet sitting on a raised concrete bed? Or is that an illusion? Is the tub sitting on a similar raised portion? This is the part that is not clear. If you were to pull everything out of the bathroom, is the floor flat? If not, which portions are raised?
 
  #11  
Old 02-16-13, 05:20 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No, there is no raised platform for either. The floor is level with the floor of the utility room which has a drain in the floor. It appears (I haven't removed anything to look yet) that the sewer lines were run and then the slab poured around them. The water main comes up right at that level out of the concrete floor with the meter sitting on top of it.
 
  #12  
Old 02-16-13, 05:43 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
OK, I was just curious. Here's the part that was confusing. Maybe you could clarify it somewhat.

If I'm only a couple inches off the slab with the tub does that still give me room to lay the pan properly? To me it looks like I'd need 4" or more, which means a step up of an inch or so when stepping over the curb??
"off the slab"....are you talking about the drain location or the height of the concrete?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: