Toilet tank filling slow - sounds like an overflow tube leak

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Old 02-16-13, 08:26 AM
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Toilet tank filling slow - sounds like an overflow tube leak

Had a fire 3 years ago, 3 bathrooms rebuilt.

The half bath toilet is not working properly, the tank fills very slowly. The other toilets (identical) fill in less than half the time.

If I pull the hose out of the overflow tube and direct it in to the tank it fills very quickly and holds the water.

If I leave the hose in the overflow tube (as it should be), the tank fills very slowly but it does eventually fill and hold the water.

What's up?
 
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Old 02-16-13, 08:29 AM
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Possibly just a different brand toilet? You could have sediment blocking the fill valve inlet.....
 
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Old 02-16-13, 08:32 AM
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Toilets are identical...

there is excellent pressure from the hose - when I pull the hose out of the overflow tube and direct it in to the tank itself, the tank fills considerably faster than the other toilets in the house.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 08:35 AM
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Only when the hose is directed in to the overflow tube does it fill slowly.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 09:44 AM
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Well, you need to keep in mind that moving that overflow tube will always speed up the fill. As the fill valve opens to let in water, about half goes in your tank and the other half goes in the overflow tube. So, obviously diverting that water to the tank will always speed up the fill.

The other thing is that the output of the fill valve that is supposed to go to the tank might be clogged up or any where from the the pipe coming out the wall all the way to your fill valve. I had a situation where the internal washer that the shut off tap used had dissintegrated over the 15 years of use and rendered that tap useless. The really unfortuneate problem was when I was playing with the tap some of that washer must of come off and it ended up lodged inside my fill valve, slowing down the incoming water to a dribble. I replaced the fill valve and only knew exactly what happened when I tore the old one apart. I just wanted to know, since it was a new fill valve before I ruined it.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 11:11 AM
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I took a couple of vids with my phone. You can see how strong the stream is but when I place it back in the overflow tube the water level rises very slowly. Again, this toilet is identical to 2 other toilets in the house, which fill about twice as quickly.

IMG 0371 - YouTube


IMG 0372 - YouTube



 

Last edited by Monte Ray; 02-16-13 at 11:26 AM.
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Old 02-16-13, 11:50 AM
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That is quite the spray out of your overflow tube. I would think that your output to the tank, on your fill valve is where the obstruction is and that water (with its pressure) is being diverted to the overflow tube.

Can you see where the water should come out for the tank, on the fill valve. Perhaps you could push something in there and dislodge it. The other options are:

Jerryrig up some kind of T on that overflow tube so that half or less goes into the overflow and the rest into the tank. The last option is just have that tube's water go into the tank. I have an American Standard cadet 3 toilet at my cottage. Since I use a jet pump to bring my water from the lake, I have my overflow tube fillilng into my tank as well, and my tank outlet on the fill valve works fine. This way all the water goes to the tank and none is diverted to the bowl. This allows me to use a lot less water and that way I don't have to hear my jet pump go on so often.

The secondary effect is I have a very little water in the bowl, for the next use, but it still flushes perfectly and the bowl doesn't seem to get any dirtyer or streak. Give it a try.

Or you could change the fill valve.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 12:11 PM
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Too much pressure out that fill tube. Does your other toiler have that much pressure?

What is the psi in the home?

Yes it would seem the water is being diverted to the fill tube more. The fill valve fills the tank from the bottom of the fill valve at the bottom of the tank.

Try closing the valve to reduce the pressure.

Let us know.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 01:14 PM
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This became an issue after we had the water line from the meter to the house replaced. Our water usage had gone from 4,000 gallons a month to 25,000 gallons a month - there was a leak in the yard. After the line was replaced, this toilet suddenly began having issues. We have better water pressure in certain parts of our house then others. House was built in 1985 but much of it was rebuilt after the fire 3 years ago.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 01:18 PM
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Perhaps I will call the plumbing co. that did the work and ask.


I guess I don't understand where the fill valve is.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 01:40 PM
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The fill valve is the thing on the left where the water comes in. As the water flushes out, the float part at the top, drops with the decreasing water level. This lowering float controls a valve that lets the water in. Some of the water comes out the bottom to fill the tank and some goes through that tube to fill the bowl. Any extra in the bowl just flows out until the fill valve stops. This happens when the water level raises the float to the point where the valve shuts off again.

My guess is your increased water pressure must have dislodged something in the line (probably a brittle washer from a tap, like in my case) and it has got itself lodged into the fill valve output line (the line used to fill the tank).

That is just a guess of course. I know the plumbing company will not take any responsibility unless they were also working on the toilet.

If you do decide to use the overflow tube to fill your tank, try to find a longer tube so the water will come out closer to the bottom of the tank. Water flow is a lot quieter if it flows under water as opposed to splashing on the top, but that is just a small improvement on noise and not necessary for the system to work.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 02:02 PM
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I should probably add, that since you are obviously getting good water and pressure out your overflow tube and very little out the fill valve, I am getting about 95% confident that you have a defective fill valve. What else could it be?

Before you decide to go with my jerryrig system using your existing fill valve, I should point out that a brand new fill valve is probably less then $20 at home depot and is about the easiest thing to change.

1) shut off the incoming water to the toilet.
2) flush and emply the tank as much as possible.
3) remove the line to the fill valve by unscrewing it.
4) unscrew the large plastic hex nut, underneath the outside of the tank, going to this valve.
5) take out the old fill valve. put the new one in and tighten up the hex nut.
6) re-connect the line to this valve. If it is old, think about getting a new flexible line so you have a brand new washer. They come in 9", 12" and 18" flexible hoses. Measure to see what works best.

Turn on the main tap to the toilet and let the tank fill. If you have a small leak, tighten the hex nut a little more. You don't need to really crank on this, just make it tight.

The water level in the tank should go to about a 1/2 inch below the top of the overflow tube. There is a knurld thumb screw on these fill valves to allow you to make small adjustments to the water level.

All done. 20 minutes if you have done it before, maybe 30 if you haven't.

I prefer Fluidmaster brand fill valves if they have them, since I find them very quiet.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 02:31 PM
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Additionally you may have had a PRV valve somewhere and it was not replaced when the line from meter to home was replace.

Yes I would say fill valve has crude that got lodged in there from when they replaced the line.

Additionally you need to get a gauge and check your homes pressure. See if you have a PRV valve on the main line somewhere. Some are at the meter.

Look like this.


Again as Oeagle state just chang the fill valve and then report back with your homes PSI.

Get a gauge at the home store that hooks to a hose bib.

 
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Old 02-17-13, 06:54 PM
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...it also appears to me to be, that the clip on the filler hose, that holds the fill line in the filler tube is constricting the water flow as it rests against the inside of the fill tube..vs being fully exposed when place alone in the tank...sorta fanning it out.. !!
 
 

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