Installing a Linear shower drain

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Old 03-19-13, 10:07 AM
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Installing a Linear shower drain

Hi All,
I am planning to remodel my bathroom which is 9 feet by 5 feet and have gutted the whole room as of now. I am looking at installing a linear shower drain tio eliminate a glass enclosure and have a curtain to seperate the shower. This will make the shower are look seamless and also make it look bigger once the shower curtain is left open to one side.
I have a few questions here and require your help with planning the project since i am a bit confused....
1. Am planning to make the shower area 36 inches deep and 5 feet wide. Will installing the linear drain at the front or push it towards the wall in the back be a good idea.
2. The bath is 61 inches wide so will a 60 inch shower drain work since the tile has to be flush with the drain. it will have tile on both the sides and will the 1 inch be good enough.
3. If the drain is installed in the front of the shower, i have about 4 inches to the front of the drain which i could slope back towards the drain to restrict any owerflow. will this work.

I am attaching a hand drawn pic just fow an idea. Any suggetions would help.
Thanks.
 
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Old 03-19-13, 03:24 PM
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I've never seen a trench (linear) drain inside a shower. I installed one outside an handicapped accessible shower for overflow. The shower pan determines which way the water flows, not the drain itself. The pan has to be sloped in that direction. I don't see how it's going to make the shower look bigger either.
 
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Old 03-19-13, 04:35 PM
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Have done numerous showers like this, you will need to pre-slope your floor which ever direction you go. However, if you are not using any glass structure, the center drain option is best as you can double slope each side toward the drain.

I usually build a short 10 inch or so wall at the service end of the shower to allow you a place to slide your curtain past and get a good seal. I'll attach a picture, and I know the questions will start flying.....
 
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Old 03-20-13, 07:12 AM
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My impression of having a setup like this will eliminate the use of a glass structure or building a 4" wall to seperate the shower area.
This setup makes the shower seamless and once we have the curtain open, the bathroom will look spacious.
That is my thought, still dont know if right or wrong and thats the reason i am posting on this forum.
Thanks.
 
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Old 03-20-13, 07:19 AM
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czizzi, thanks for the response and great work on that bath. i am assuming that you have used a 60" drain for this work. can you tell me the make and price of this one. am looking for a similar setup and the price of these drains are about 700 for a 60".
did you have to cut the sub floor in order to directly install the drain on the joists?
Is the outlet on this one positioned in the center or to the sides. this will help me decide which one is better.
What is your take on the site sizeable ones that are available. to me they look like they are pron to leaks sometime down the road.
Thanks for the pic, great help.
 
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Old 03-20-13, 05:32 PM
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I actually used a 54" drain as I had to sneak in space allocated in the corner for a couple of body jets. We also had a rain head coming out of the ceiling.

The complete system included a drain body, pre-sloped floor inserts, waterproofing membrane and waterproofing sealant. I ordered enough waterproofing membrane to cover the base of the shower (traditional pan), walls up to the ceiling, and out into the room 5 feet to waterproof for oversplash. and multiple outside corners to seal around the partial return wall. The drain has a 2" offset throat and rests on top of your subfloor. If you have 1/2" + 3/4" subfloor you do not need to notch the floor joists. Package was around $1200, not cheap but included all the elements need to complete the build.
 
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