How to demolish shower wall w/ lathe?

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Old 04-29-13, 09:16 PM
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How to demolish shower wall w/ lathe?

hello everyone

I am remodeling a walk in shower stall. It it only 13 years old and works normally but it's is purely for a changing the ugly tile on it w/ warmer porcelain look. While at it, we want to add body sprays and handheld shower bar.

I have removed some tiles on the walls and the floor. They came off rather easy.
Behind the wall tile, we have a cement mud w/ a metal lathe over a drywalls.

First question, what is the best wast to remove down to stud?

Regarding the floor, what is best, remove everything, replace the iron cast drain?

All I want is the quickest way (but leak free) so that we can tile it again. I am familiar w/ tiling, but this is my first time, w/ a shower, w/ deck mud, shower pan, drain, which seems a bit overwhelming. I understand how traditional showers are built, but it seems a lot of work. Whatever is the easiert, I will take it.

Would you have advices for a shower newbie?

Many thanks
 
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Old 04-30-13, 07:06 AM
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How come any demo I perform, the tiles never pop off that easy or cleanly?....

To take the walls down to studs and the floor down to wood you will need either a small demo hammer or a hammer drill that has a hammer only (no rotation) function. A large sledge hammer if you want a real workout. You need to chip a 1" to 2" vertical groove from top to bottom on the wall. Focus your area between the studs and get down to the wire lathe. Cut the wire lathe and the sections should lift out. Wear heavy leather gloves, a good mask or respirator and set a fan up in the window blowing OUT to draw the dust to the outside. Work not larger than 16" x 16" chunks as they will be very heavy. Be careful as the lathe is sharp and you could easily get cut.

The floor? Well just chip and it will tell you what to do. Expect it to come up in little pieces. You will need lots of thick contractor cleanup bags, a shovel and a strong helper for everything.

Best to start fresh from drain to shower rough-ins.

If you are going with body sprays, it is best to have a tankless water heater. Check the GPM flow of all the items items in your shower to see how fast it would drain a normal tank. If you want long showers, and you have a standard water heater (tank style) you will be disappointed.
 
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Old 04-30-13, 07:25 AM
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You picked the wrong style bathroom of you want it easy.
Got to get rid of any old steel supplys, and cast iron drains.
There all going to rust out and leak or plug up at some point.
I use a diamond blade on a 4-1/2" right angle grinder to cut into the inside corners and to cut the walls into sections. It will go right through the plaster and lath.

I would replace all the supplys with 3/4" lines for better flow.
 
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Old 04-30-13, 10:54 AM
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Thank Joe and czizzi for your advices. I really appreciate your help. Looks like it's the whole job ahead of me.

I notice the tiles have little thinset on it. Half of them came out in one piece and the back of the tile is so clean that I cold reuse if I wanted.

Using a hammer drill or sledge hammer, would I go directly on the wall w/ the tiles still on it? Given there is lathe it should be low risk of punching the wall behind it right?

Joe, using the diamond blade, did you have to keep pouring water to keep the blade cool? Any concern if the water goes in the drain mixed w/ cement dust?

Many thanks
 
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Old 04-30-13, 04:33 PM
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You plug the drain so no debris gets down there. Take a old hand towel, wad it up and stuff it into the pipe. If you sledge hammer, take all item off any shelves or pictures in adjacent rooms and possible below as well. You will rattle them right off the shelf onto the ground.

The thinset was mixed too dry and the tiles did not get a good bond.

If trying a diamond blade, heed my suggestion of the mask, a fan in the window and negative pressure to blow the air to the outside. Grinding cement will be exceptionally dusty.
 
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Old 04-30-13, 05:00 PM
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Hi, I am sure you will find a mehod that works well for you. The best advice I can give you is get a bunch of small boxes. This type of debris gets real heavy real quick. And second, this ain't going to be no weekend project.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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Old 04-30-13, 05:24 PM
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I see, you use the diamond blade dry. I always thought diamond blades have to be cooled down w/ water and that would minimize the dust as well. But my concern was the dust coming down the drain.
This is ain't easy. I budgeted 6 week ends for the shower stall alone. I hope to meet my challenge.
 
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Old 05-01-13, 07:36 PM
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A contractor advised me to build the pre-slope in wood and then pour roofing tar instead of using a plastic liner. Then the usual concrete goes on top of this.

Any thoughts on this idea? Is that more reliable than the liner between 2 mortar layers?

Thanks much
 
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Old 05-02-13, 07:23 AM
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No, go with a liner that you can run 9" up the walls and over the curb. That way you make a mini bath tub and the water has no where to go except the drain. The extra liner going up the wall is layered and shingled with the vapor barrier so that any water that gets behind the wall tiles (mostly in the corners) will be directed into the pan as well. This will also involve addition blocking between the studs all the way around to support the liner.

How to build a shower - Building a shower pan with pre-sloped mortar bed, liner and curb.

You want a 2 part shower drain, one to catch any water that gets to the pan and one that is visible up top for the normal shower water to go down.
 
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Old 05-02-13, 11:11 AM
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Thanks czizzi. I now recall the term he used, it's hot mop. Thus it must be: wood preslope, hot mop, deck mud, thinset, tile. I live in CA and it seems hot mop is quite popular here. While looking online, it seems people are doing either the plastic liner traditional style or the shluter membrane. Thus I was surprised to hear the hot mop type, but after reading about it last night, I wonder how that is better or different than other liquid membranes (such as redguard or hydroban) which does not require the deckmud over the membrane.
 
 

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