Help is this black mold in my shower? How do I identify fix

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Old 09-16-13, 12:26 PM
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Help is this black mold in my shower? How do I identify fix

So, I was going about to replace the failing caulk in our bathroom shower that is seldom used. We just moved in here and the house has been vacant for 2 years.

As I removed the previous caulk, I noticed black powder. Is this black mold? Should I be worried? how should I go about taking care of this?

The walls look like, drywall with plaster on top of it. The black stuff seems to be on the drywall. I cannot detect any musty odor but then I'm not sure what I am smelling for!

Any help would be appreciated. I hope this is in the right sub-forum...
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Attachment 17854
 
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Old 09-16-13, 01:53 PM
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I do hope the walls of your shower are not sheetrock or plaster Here's a better link for you to post pictures. The one you used didn't work. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 09-16-13, 05:08 PM
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trying the pictures again

Hmmm, the pictures work for me when I click the link. Sorry not sure what is wrong.

Perhaps, I should try inline image display.

But thank you for your reply and yes, I have a shower and tub cabinet sort of thing and above it is drywall. I've added another picture that shows the shower enclosure the white is the ceramic/plastic shower enclosure and above it is the drywall. Is this a problem to have drywall here?
 
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Old 09-16-13, 05:39 PM
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No problem, I had just envisioned the entire shower as plaster/rock, etc. Heart attack over It is perfectly normal to have sheetrock above shower enclosures like yours. You have just had water infiltration from overly zealous shower people splashing water all about or you have had a leak that may have been repaired, but the water stayed behind making a home for mold. I would cut vertically at the edge of the tub and in the corner and across the ceiling and remove this piece of moldy sheetrock, installing a new piece of greenboard, which is moisture resistant. DensArmor is better, but probably twice the cost and really not needed. Then you can prime the sheetrock, caulk the lower edge where it meets the shower and paint.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 05:54 PM
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Ok phew! thanks. I was envisioning a huge project.

Do I have to worry about the shower enclosure... will there be some mold growing behind there. Or is this unlikely... just spray bleach and move on....

also this will be my first time working with drywall... how do I seal where the drywall meets the ceiling...
 
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Old 09-16-13, 09:36 PM
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Going have to use paper drywall tape.
I'll post a web site that has lots of videos on how to work with drywall.
SHEETROCK Brand All-Purpose Joint Compound by USG Corporation
Someone messed up when they installed that shower head. It's to low, it should have been above the enclosure not though it. There's no way for the estuation to seal the water out like that, it's going to sit at an angle.
The pipe needs to be extended.
No one here is going to be able to tell you what's behind a wall there, just going to have to open it up and look.
 
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Old 09-17-13, 05:08 AM
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IMO regular drywall is fine for this application. It does need to be primed and painted with latex enamel [bath paint is even better] Where the drywall meets the top of the shower should be caulked between the primer and finish coat.
 
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Old 09-17-13, 07:25 AM
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Thanks for the input joecaption1 and marksr.

That site is great, I've been looking for good videos on drywall...

Actually, it might be hard to tell from the pictures but the showerhead is above the enclosure. By about an inch or so. Its just above a strip of wood that is painted white. Do you think I still need to get the pipe extended?

Also, what does estuation mean? the dictionary says "commotion"...
 
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Old 09-17-13, 07:46 AM
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How high a shower head is, is not set in stone. 61" from the surface of the pan or tub floor is average.
I try to have mine from 4 to 6" above the enclosure so it does not interfere with the trim ring and does not beak out on the bottom of the sheetrock from being so thin. (es****ion = trim ring)
 
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Old 09-17-13, 08:22 AM
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That makes complete sense now. Yes, I can see how the clearance of the trim ring would be important. Thanks for the clarification.
 
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Old 09-17-13, 02:12 PM
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Does the escutcheon ring set flat against the wall or does the top edge of the shower kick it out? I'm a painter not a plumber so I don't know how much work it would be to open up the wall and raise the shower head - is the current height ok with you now? or do you have to stoop over a little bit when rinsing your head? I'd probably let that be the determining factor

I didn't think to mention it earlier but you should also caulk around the pipe where it exits the drywall and prime/paint under the escutcheon ring.
 
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Old 09-18-13, 03:53 PM
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Thanks marksr.

Yes the e. ring sits flat against the wall. Just about! Maybe 3/8 inch clearance.

We actually have never used the shower in this bathroom. But height seems acceptable. Could be raised though but thats above my skill level... and nervous to fiddle around with water pipes...

Yes, I was going to use Great Stuff spray foam to seal around the edges of the pipe exiting the drywall.

Going to do everything this weekend... for now bathroom is cordoned off and sprayed down with mold killer. The mold was sooty and, I suspect, dead to begin with. Our noble seller seems to have just painted over the mold... would be par for the course....
 
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Old 09-19-13, 04:19 AM
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So you are going to fill the void with spray foam and not replace a portion of the drywall
If you replace part of the drywall you shouldn't need any spray foam and caulking should be good enough for the gaps at the shower pipe and between the drywall and the top of the tub surround.
 
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Old 09-19-13, 10:56 AM
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No, I was going to replace the whole drywall slab above the shower as recommended. But I was not sure I could make the cuts precise enough for caulk... did not want to use a backer rod here.

Actually caulk would be preferable I am sure... but is there a reason against using spray foam if the gap is more than 1/2 inch so I cannot effectively caulk
 
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Old 09-19-13, 02:56 PM
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I don't know how waterproof the spray foam is. Normally cutting a hole that can be caulked isn't a big deal but I have seen some boogered up jobs where some drywall tape and/or joint compound was needed. You still caulk even if the drywall or j/c is tight - the caulk gives a better seal.
 
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Old 09-22-13, 09:49 AM
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shower repair

If you Use a straight edge and utility knife to score and cut the sheetrock, you should be able to do an accurate job cutting. I'd shy away from using spray foam to seal any holes.
 
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Old 10-02-13, 09:04 PM
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Thumbs up Shower Mold

One thing I've done when replacing a portion of drywall is chalk a straight line about half way up between the top of the shower and the ceiling. Then use the straight edge to cut the drywall out there. This way you are not dealing with the corner of the ceiling, you are just working on a straight seem. If you haven't worked with mold before, there is a website that will give you 10 quick facts about mold , and I like this page that gives a quick rundown of preventing mold from returning after you've put all that work into fixing it.
Good luck man.
 
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Old 10-14-13, 10:19 AM
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Just saw this reply. My notifications dont seem to be working right.
Thanks, StrangeCap, those are some good links for dealing with mold. Very useful. cheers.
 
 

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