Securing a wiggly bath spout and pipe

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-12-13, 07:50 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 88
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Question Securing a wiggly bath spout and pipe

One of our bathtub's spouts wiggles. I popped open the access panel in the adjoining closet and the image below is what's there. The spout (on the other side of the wall, not shown, obviously) attaches to the pipe with an allen bolt and, because the pipe has a bit of give to it, the spout wiggles as well.

It's not shown in my photo, but the section of pipe continuing above the spout hole is actually fairly secure against a beam in the wall; it's just the L section going out the hole that isn't secured. So I'm thinking I just need to stop that L section from moving around to stop the exterior spout from wiggling.

I think the space is too tight for a brace or bracket and am not sure that would stop the lateral movement anyway; would low-expansion foam around this side of the opening and the L section hold it all in place?

Name:  DSC06897.jpg
Views: 15168
Size:  14.1 KB

Thanks!
Jamie
 
  #2  
Old 11-12-13, 08:27 AM
J
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4,294
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Someone messed up and used Shark Bite fittings there.
That all should have been all soldered fittings from the valve to the spout.
There is no way to "fix" what's there, it needs to be redone.
 
  #3  
Old 11-12-13, 08:28 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
You could put a 2x4 flat notched for the pipes in the space. Then wrap plumbers metal strapping around the pipes to hold them in the notches.
 
  #4  
Old 11-12-13, 09:02 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 88
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
There is no way to "fix" what's there, it needs to be redone.
Sure there is, I just need to figure out what's feasible to stop the pipe from shifting slightly. Unless there's a safety hazard here, I don't see why redoing anything is necessary?

You could put a 2x4 flat notched for the pipes in the space. Then wrap plumbers metal strapping around the pipes to hold them in the notches.
Thanks. So if I'm understanding correctly... You're saying place the 2x4 between the wall and the pipe, so the pipes basically sit in the notches, and then secure the pipe to the 2x4? Once the spout's back on that definitely seems like it would stop any forward/backward movement.
 
  #5  
Old 11-12-13, 09:11 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,410
Received 744 Votes on 684 Posts
Best would be Joe's suggestion to re-do the piping with soldered connections. What Ray mentions is about the only way to improve the situation since press-to-connect fittings were never intended to provide structural strength like you need. When installing the metal strapping I would attach one end of the strap. Wrap the strapping around the pipe you want to reinforce and use a long screw driven into the wood at an angle so when you tighten (screw in) the screw it pulls the strapping tighter. Another option might be to get a hose clamp or two around the elbow for the tub spout and hose clamp to steel or wood bracing, something you would have to come up with. In the end anything with those push connect fittings is going to be a hokey, Band-Aid fix. You might firm it up some but it will probably never be rock solid.
 
  #6  
Old 11-12-13, 10:36 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 88
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Maybe I'm just not understanding, but for knowledge's sake... How would changing out the fittings/connections fix the specific back-and-forth movement of the spout pipe? I would think the problem here is that the elbow portion of the spout's pipe isn't secured to anything, meaning it wiggles, yeah? If I change out the connectors, that section still wouldn't be attached to anything and would still wiggle.
 
  #7  
Old 11-12-13, 10:47 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,410
Received 744 Votes on 684 Posts
Soldered copper pipe has significant strength which essentially attaches the elbow fitting to the faucet's body. Also since the pipe has some strength you can brace to the vertical pipe leading down to the elbow. Shark-bite fittings are water tight but are not intended to provide physical strength or stiffness and allow the pipe to move.
 
  #8  
Old 11-12-13, 12:31 PM
J
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4,294
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What's to stop the spout the spout from turning with just a brace on the back side of the wall?
 
  #9  
Old 11-12-13, 12:53 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 88
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
There won't "just" be a brace. The allen bolt (as mentioned in my first post) that holds the spout to the pipe is quite secure; once the wiggle is resolved the spout will also be siliconed to the wall.
 
  #10  
Old 11-12-13, 01:04 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Note even with galvanized pipes I always secured them as explained. I never trusted just the pipes to hold the faucets so I'd brace it even if the fittings were changed. But pros might disagree.
 
  #11  
Old 11-12-13, 02:02 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,410
Received 744 Votes on 684 Posts
Even with a set screw securing your spout on the pipe it will still turn. The pipe is still free to rotate in the Shark-Bite fitting. Unfortunately the 90 fitting is in the hole in the wall so there is no room to clamp or brace it. Clamping the 90 is about the best you can do short of getting rid of the Shark-Bite on the spout plumbing. The other Shark-Bites can stay but the piping is very important in supporting the spout. Change that one to threaded steel (not a good option IMO) piping or soldered copper, brace it and you will be much happier with the results.
 
  #12  
Old 11-12-13, 02:40 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 88
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Okay... When you say to replace the Sharkbite on the spout plumbing, specifcally what in this picture does that involve? Is it every part of that middle pipe from the big junction bit on down (as I've circled in red), or less of it just down by the elbow going through the hole? I'm (probably obviously) not familiar with the different types of pipes and connectors and definitely don't have a soldering torch; is this something I'd have to hire someone to do?

Name:  DSC06907.jpg
Views: 8527
Size:  31.5 KB

Thanks again everyone, I appreciate you all taking the time to talk me through this.
 
  #13  
Old 11-12-13, 02:50 PM
J
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4,294
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
All of that you have circled should go.
It would take of about 1/2 hour 2, fittings and a short piece of copper pipe to fix it.
Some DIY had to have plumbed this, I just noticed the compression coupling that's going to be behind the wall. They used three fittings one being an expensive Shark Bite instead of one .50 adaptor.
That one loose tub spout can end up costing you big time when it leaks behind the wall.
soldering copper pipe - Bing Videos
 
  #14  
Old 11-12-13, 03:08 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
I'd say use threaded brass fitting if you don't know how to solder. You come down from the valve with a nipple then put an elbow on it.

Name:  DSC06907.jpg
Views: 8584
Size:  28.9 KB
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-12-13 at 03:32 PM.
  #15  
Old 11-12-13, 03:36 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 88
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Ha! I love it, thank you for the visual; that actually helps immensely.
 
  #16  
Old 11-15-13, 09:20 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 88
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Thumbs up

Hey, so I just wanted to pop back in and say "thanks" to everyone who replied in this thread.

Although I ended up having my plumber replace the naughty bits of plumbing with soldered copper this morning, I was still able to have an intelligent conversation with him about what the previous owners did wrong, what we were doing to fix it, and was or wasn't necessary, all thanks to you guys.
 
  #17  
Old 11-15-13, 11:12 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Thanks for letting us know the outcome.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: