Shower drain not level, what to do?

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Old 01-11-14, 11:18 AM
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Shower drain not level, what to do?

So I thought I was ready to prime and level my shower area, now not so sure.
The contractor-installed drain isn't level
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Can't really find any diagrams of what the drain is supposed to look like in a slab, lot's of plywood examples which would be easy to deal with but I don't know what to do about this. Headed to Lowe's since it's close to see what advice they can offer but would like to know from this group, what do I do about this?

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-11-14, 12:18 PM
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Not sure if that is the most reliable of levels to use for this purpose. They are designed for accuracy of a vertical post and not necessarily to sit level on the ground. The shower drain is a multi-part system. What you have there is the bottom portion of the drain. The pan liner will be installed, and a cap will be put over this and those bolts secured. Then a third piece is screwed down in to the center threaded hole to the depth of the finished tile. As long as the overall drain is the lowest point in the shower, it may not matter that the drain body itself is off a fraction. The water will still drain.

Is the concrete around the drain level?
 
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Old 01-12-14, 08:52 AM
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Okay I looked at this again after being away and I see that it probably doesn't matter that the base is off level a bit, the collar can be adjusted and maybe some little plastic shims put in under the liner if needed before it's tightened down? Speaking of these bolts that tighten down the collar, should they be rust proof?? There's already rust on one from the concrete that was splashed about….

No the concrete is not level (yet) my plan was to buy this Custom Building Products 1-qt. LevelQuik Latex Primer-CPQT at The Home Depot today and paint it on then use this leveling compound tomorrow Custom Building Products 50 lb. LevelQuik Rapid-Setting Self-Leveling Underlayment-LQ50 at The Home Depot

Following weekend curb and pre-slope, weekend after that liner and mud bed. Question, I haven't seen any mention of "glueing" down the liner but I see HD promotes and sells an Oatey product to do that, is it a good idea/necessary, or not?

Thanks cizizzi!
 
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Old 01-12-14, 09:11 AM
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Before you self level, know that the pre-slope will negate any self leveling that you do. The pan liner goes on top of the pre-slope. Save yourself some money, and a weekend, and proceed directly to the preslope. Lets step back and make sure ducks are in a row.

It looks like plywood is on the walls, is this correct? Should be 2x8 or 2x10 blocking in between the studs. Plywood does not belong in the mix in any way. Base plates should be pressure treated, Lumber to build the curb should be in place.

How to build a shower - Building a shower pan with pre-sloped mortar bed, liner and curb.

This link will show you that the liner gets a bead of sealant prior to the cap for the liner being installed. Study the link well, as it gives you all the knowledge you need to proceed. Remove the bolts from the drain and cover with a double layer of masking tape. This will protect the threaded portions of the drain from cement splash. It will also preserve the total base drain in pristine condition for the rest of the install. Easiest way to form the curb is with a pre-formed curb that fits over the liner before the final slope is installed. You secure it with nails on the outside of the curb only. Lathe and cement curbs are time consuming, you fight sagging concrete and have to baby it. But not out of the question for a rookie who takes pride in his work.

Please tell me you have more levels than the one you used to check the drain. Three levels are used depending on the size of the shower. 4' level to do the long wall, 2' level to do the shorter walls, and a speed level to check everywhere that the slope is correct and consistant toward the drain.
 
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Old 01-12-14, 11:15 AM
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Ah see…that's what I wanted to hear :-)

Okay, feeling quite silly, but yes, okay nix the leveling. Happy. The plywood is an exterior shear wall, I'm in CA, not supposed to be messing with those. Plan was to have liner against plywood, cover with hardibacker. Noticed some folk saying that the 2x10 blocking should be set back a bit and the 2x4s notched out to accommodate the liner? Maybe that was for thick preformed pans? Okay so block, curb, pre slope. The place I went to for the preformed curb didn't have what I was thinking, they had the quick pitch plastic (products) and curb.

Yes other levels :-) I'll review the link again!

You wrote, "But not out of the question for a rookie who takes pride in his work."
Make that "her" work

Thanks czizzi!
 
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Old 01-12-14, 12:43 PM
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Make that "her" work
Yikes, my apologies Madam,

The pan liner will add some dimension, especially when you fold it over in the corners and create a triple thickness. Some do as you were told (lot of work) some add a thin piece of molding to the studs above the liner (liquid nails then nail it up), and others don't do anything and try to blend the bump into the surrounding tile. Make a call when you are ready to install your backerboard.

Take it slow, a little at a time and we will get this shower done with you. Visit a couple of tile stores (not box stores or flooring stores) and they can guide you on pre-formed curbs. Here is an example - Tile Shower Pans, Benches and Niches - Lifetime System Warranty

If the pre-slope sticks work for your showers dimension, then fine. I cut my own to fit my custom needs. Use them as guides and then remove them and fill in the voids with mud. I make them out of tapered 2x4's and make different ones for each slope. The top slope will be much thicker at the drain than the pre-slope.

Refer to the manufacturers recommendation on your floor mud as you are on a slab. They may still recommend primer on the slab, just no need to self level.
 
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Old 01-14-14, 06:17 AM
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Yikes, my apologies Madam,
Oh dear, no, I'm not 1) that old, and/or 2) in that profession :-)

Okay, super, thanks for the help czizzi. I'll keep you posted!
 
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Old 01-14-14, 01:59 PM
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Okay, so the guys that put up the hardibacker didn't put up the tar paper barrier and I have to take responsibility. Should I pull down the hardibacker put up the paper and then reinstall or Redguard what I have? Pros/cons.

Always something when you DIY it…well…and usually too when you hire it out, lol.
 
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Old 01-15-14, 08:10 AM
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So you got your pre-slope in, then your pan liner, and then they put up the hardibacker.....correct? If that is the case, then tape the seams really well and redgard the whole thing. Then install your final slope.
 
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