Unscrewed tub spout but wall pipe came out with it

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Old 03-10-14, 11:59 PM
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Unscrewed tub spout but wall pipe came out with it

Tried to remove a stuck screw-off tub spout using all sorts of methods, including hammering on screwdrivers inserted into the spout opening. Nothing worked until I got a 24" pipe wrench. Unfortunately, the tub spout itself didn't come off the pipe; instead, the pipe unscrewed from inside the wall. The pipe looks fine, though I have no idea how I can get it off the spout. According to the manual left me by the previous home owner, this is a Price Pfister 808E tub spout. It's not very clear in the 2nd picture, but there's a TON of hard mineral deposits inside the spout, which I'm guessing is the main reason why it was stuck in the first place. There's also some green/blue color where the pipe and the spout meet, so possible corrosion, too.

What should I do to fix this? Simply get a new piece of pipe and simply screw it into the wall? As far as replacing the spout, thanks to this fiasco, I'm thinking set screws must be the way to go. Are there any pros or cons as far as screw-in vs set screw?

Photos here:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...t/IMG_0533.JPG
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...t/IMG_0534.JPG
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...t/IMG_0536.JPG
 
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Old 03-11-14, 12:19 AM
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What should I do to fix this? Simply get a new piece of pipe and simply screw it into the wall?
That's what I would do. Use both Teflon tape and Teflon pipe joint goo on the threaded ends. I've never used a setscrew-type spout so I can't comment on that.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 12:40 AM
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Use both Teflon tape and Teflon pipe joint goo on the threaded ends.
Thanks, I take it tape first and then goo over it? I've never done either but have seen the tape enough to have an idea of how it works. I don't think I've seen or heard of pipe joint goo before, though.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 12:51 AM
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Yes, tape first, about 1-1/2 to 2 wraps and then the Teflon paste. Teflon pipe joint paste comes in tubes and in cans with a built-in brush applicator. I used the word goo because paste eluded my brain for a few minutes.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 01:57 AM
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When you sniff too much paste, your brain turns to goo. Haha, sorry, couldn't resist.

So how tightly should I turn the new pipe once I get it in, hand tight? If more than just hand tight, how tight and what tool do you use since the pipe is circular?
 
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Old 03-11-14, 05:22 AM
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Much more than hand tight. Pipe threads use an interference fit. Tightness makes the seal, not the tape or the paste, but they help.

By the way, how old is that faucet set? If its newer than 1997, then there is a good chance it has a life time warranty. CAll Price Phister and see if they will send you a new spout.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 01:26 PM
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CAll Price Phister and see if they will send you a new spout.
Good tip, thanks! On their website, it seems to suggest the warranty is only for the original buyer and not transferrable to new owners, but I'll call anyway and maybe I'll get lucky.

So what tool do you use to tighten the pipe? Is there some sort of pipe torque wrench? I'm worried about over-tightening and then cracking the female part of the receiving pipe in the wall.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 04:08 PM
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Idealy you would a typical pipe wrench. And you should not have to tighten so much that you crack the pipe or fitting. However, since you can't grip the fitting with another pipe wrench I would be careful and gingerelt tighten as much as you can before you think you'll break it. And use plenty of that paste. You can put a rag around the pipe to help prevent major gouging.
 
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Old 03-12-14, 03:51 PM
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Pfister said they'd send me a one-time replacement on the spout since I'm not the original owner. Thanks again for that tip!
 
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Old 03-12-14, 06:33 PM
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I was able to tighten it in and the connection seems good. I didn't want to over-torque it, though, especially since I'm using a 24" pipe wrench, so I didn't tighten too much. Will it be immediately obvious if there's a leak in the wall connection? I've turned on the water and it comes out of the pipe just fine, and there doesn't seem to be any wet spots in the dry wall, but hole is just big enough for the pipe, so you can't actually see the connection.
 

Last edited by MaximumXC; 03-12-14 at 06:53 PM.
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Old 03-13-14, 05:41 AM
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Try stuffing some paper towels or a clean soft rag in the hole and see if it gets wet. If you used lots of TFE tape and TFE paste and tightened hard and firm you'll be OK.
 
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Old 03-13-14, 08:40 PM
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Thanks, but unfortunately, the hole is literally just big enough for the pipe. I have no idea how they did it, but it's perfectly shaped and just clears the pipe on all sides. I think I've gone about 1 full turn past hand tight, give or take, so I'll just hope for the best.
 
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Old 03-14-14, 05:14 AM
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If it was me, I would enlarge that hole. Using a dremel. They make special hole saws that you can use. If you have a spare tile use that to make a bigger hole and replace the tile.
 
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Old 03-17-14, 06:40 PM
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That's a good idea. I have a dremel already, so I guess it'd be a good excuse to try out the grinding attachment. The tile hole is actually fairly big, just not the dry wall beneath the tile, so if I'm careful, I should be able to do it without damaging the tiles.

Problem now is the replacement spout arrived and apparently they changed the design of it a bit and the nipple is just a tad too short. From my measurements, looks like I'm maybe .5" short of being able to connect the spout. Guess I'm going back to the store for a 6.5" nipple or else an extender of some sort.
 
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Old 04-01-14, 11:32 PM
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I couldn't find a 6.5" nipple, the longest I saw was the 6" one I already have. I bought a female-female adapter (didn't see any female-male adapters, do those exist?) and a close nipple. Problem is, now it's about 1-1/8" to 1-1/4" too long! This is getting pretty frustrating.

If I use a 5" nipple with the adapter and the close nipple, there will still be a gap between the wall and the tub spout of about 1/8" to 1/4". Is that small enough to caulk in and call it good, or should I now be looking for some really weird length of nipple?
 
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Old 04-02-14, 05:40 AM
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Many independent hardware stores, at least in my neck of the woods, will cut whatever length nipple you need.
 
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Old 04-02-14, 06:49 PM
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Went to a plumbing supply store and got a 6.5" nipple with a .25" flange and now everything fits.

I've cranked the spout as tightly as I can with a 24" pipe wrench and some water still trickles out the drain hole in the back. Is that simply normal? As tight as it is, shouldn't all the water be coming through the spout and not leaking back to the drain hole?
 
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Old 04-03-14, 01:22 AM
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What drain hole?
And for the record, I have no idea what Norm has been recommending, about enlarging the hole and stuffing paper towels in there.

The spout doesn't hold pressure, so you don't have to worry about it being as tight as a valve would require.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 02:16 AM
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At the very back of the spout, where it flares out and meets the wall, there's a little hole cut out of the metal, I think precisely to allow water to drain out into the tub should there be an internal leak. So, the drain hole itself is working just as it should, I'm simply wondering if there should be any water leaking internally in the first place. It only seems to happen when I pull up the shower diverter. I'd say 95% of the water does go up to the shower, but the spout drips a little and there's also a tiny stream coming out the back of the spout where it meets the wall. I don't notice any dripping from the back when the diverter is down and water is coming out the spout.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 10:44 AM
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Wonder if its because the diverter isnt doing its job 100% (leaks) and a thus trickle of water runs through the spout when it should be all diverted to the shower. And because it is only a trickle, it runs backwards on the spout pipe and drips out the drain hole.

But when there is full water pressure on the water to the spout, i.e., when all the water is diverted to the spout, there is no backward trickle and thus no water coming out the spout drain hole?

Ok I admit, pretty nutty. lol But how about giving me a B- for effort.lol (OK an F) lol
 
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Old 04-03-14, 09:16 PM
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Haha, actually, I think that's the right explanation, I'm just wondering whether I need to worry about it. Unless someone tells me it's going to cause bigger problems if I don't deal with it, I'm tempted to just leave it be since I don't want to go through tearing everything apart again.
 
 

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