Correct installation of a Studor Mini Vent in an island sink (NJ)

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Old 04-15-14, 12:33 PM
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Correct installation of a Studor Mini Vent in an island sink (NJ)

Hey guys. I've been struggling with this for a few weeks and figured I'd post my dilemna here.

i am renovating my kitchen and moving my sink to an island configuration. I have full access to the floor underneath through my basement. My tile guy is coming in next week and I need to get a few holes drilled for the pipes. I called two plumbers and they wanted a ridiculous amount of money to spend a few hours in my house sorting it all out. I'm already over budget and smarter than the average bear, but i tend to OVER ANALYZE everything. With the abundance of information on the internet I keep running in circles.


TO MY QUESTION: What's the best configuration for use of mini-vent for an island with a kitchen sink and a dishwasher? Do I put the mini vent in a horizontal pipe with the Studor vent sitting on the top of a tee, or do i put the vent on the top of a tee in a vertical setup?

Any help would be appreciated.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 12:06 AM
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Either configuration will work, depending on how much room you have inside the sink cabinet. If the drain outlet goes into the back of the cabinet I usually do a santee on its back with the studor vent on top, piped into the side of the tee. If the drain is leaving through the floor of the cabinet I put the studor on the top of the assembly with a clean out plug then a santee accepting the waste from the Ptrap.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 06:50 AM
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I'll be going through the floor and the second option with the studor on top makes a lot more sense. I'm assuming I need to go as high in the cabinet as I can (or at least above the sink drain), with leaving room to access the Studor vent?
 
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Old 04-16-14, 07:13 AM
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NEVER install a sanitary tee on its back. Doing so will almost assure you of failing the inspection.

Yes, the AAV needs to be as high as possible in the cabinet and yet still be available for servicing. If at all possible install a conventional vent rather than an AAV.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 08:00 AM
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I actually wouldn't mind putting the extra effort into a loop vent, but both plumbing companies recommended the AAV since the location of the sink in respect to where my main vent is would be a bit on the difficult side. My kitchen is an addition on the other side of the original concrete bearing walls, so it makes things a bit more, cumbersome and problematic.

I was going to do this configuration: Air Admittance Kit W/P Trappvc - Rakuten.com Shopping
But, then I saw this configuration (which is when I wasn't sure which was better):
http://www.askmehelpdesk.com/attachm...allation-1.jpg

I'm assuming the first one is better?
 
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Old 04-16-14, 08:23 PM
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I prefer the picture in the second link although I would try to get the AAV higher.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 09:24 PM
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yes this one...




Id prefer this and may be code if studors are not allowed in your municipality. This is how I would want my island sink to be...

 
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Old 04-18-14, 05:18 AM
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Thank you gentlemen! I appreciate the assistance.

Also, is there any benefit to running a 2 inch waste line versus a 1.5 inch waste line for a sink/dishwasher combo?

Once again, research online isn't very definitive. 1.5 inches seems to be the norm, but a few people suggested 2 inches, but.. in some cases, bigger isn't always better.
 
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Old 04-18-14, 06:22 AM
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1 1/2 is standard but I've been hearing that 2" is becoming popular. What I do know is that the branch drains should never be bigger than what they drain into. You always want to go from smaller to bigger as you drain away the waste. So if new construction of a home then possibly 2" kitchen drains into a 3" main is possible, but not on older homes with something that might be less than 3" or 4" mains.
 
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Old 04-22-14, 01:51 AM
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Furd takes umbrage with my idea of installing a Studor vent on the back of a santee. I see his point, but it is allowed in my jurisdiction, and is shown as a recommended installation in the Studor vent literature (when installed inside a sink cabinet). Often it is the only way I can get the damn things in when you are trying to get one into the back of a sink cabinet. There is often so little room to get it in between the back wall and the trap.

2" drain pipe is now the standard for both UPC and IPC codes for kitchen sink drains. Do 2" if you can.

And natural venting is always preferable to using a AAV (studor vent). If we are grading you will get a C+ for using a studor, but an A for the island vent. The AAV will eventually fail, but we are talking about replacing a $20 mechanical component every 20 years vs. doing natural venting that should last 100+ years.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 12:52 PM
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I've had 2 plumbers come in, and when they took a look at the location of the island and the potential routes for the necessary plumbing, they both recommended an AAV. $20 every 20 years..that should be, at max, $60 if I live to 80 years old, I think I can live with that.

At least rate me a B or B+ for "wanting" to do it without an AAV!
 
 

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