Leak from new bathroom sink drain pipe washer.

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  #1  
Old 08-04-14, 11:50 PM
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Leak from new bathroom sink drain pipe washer.

New sink, new Moen faucet and drain. Got a small leak from the big rubber drain pipe washer directly under the sink.

Was I supposed to apply any kind of sealant to the washer beforehand? I'm concerned about using too much force on the big nut that compresses the washer as it looks like it's already being squeezed really hard against this virtuous china sink. There was nothing in the Moen instructions about using a sealant but I'm wondering if I should take it apart and apply some silicone around the lip, or do I just keep wrenching it until it stops (or cracks the sink)?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-05-14, 02:38 AM
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Did you install plumber's putty under the flange inside the sink?
 
  #3  
Old 08-05-14, 05:05 AM
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Sometimes you need a little thread sealant on the drain under the large washer. Is the leak on the thread side or on the out side of the washer? Sometimes loosening and resetting a 2nd time does the trick.
 
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Old 08-05-14, 12:44 PM
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Assuming it's leaking on the inside of the rubber washer, the thread side, like czizzi said.

Back the nut down as far as you can and apply a few turns of Teflon tape and (I like to use Teflon paste) directly under rubber washer and retighten nut.

These nuts often leak upon first assembly.

It shouldn't leak from threads after this. Tighten until rubber washer is seated well and no leaks at top of rubber washer.
 
  #5  
Old 08-06-14, 04:47 PM
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I took it apart and it looks like it was leaking from both outside and inside through the treads. The sink has a lot of imperfections where the washer is supposed to seal, so after drying all the parts I ended up shooting a big bead of silicone adhesive around the hole and installed it again. It may have been overkill but it doesn't leak anymore. I figure with all new parts and new sink, it won't need to be removed for a very long time, and the silicone is never supposed to harden anyway, so it's not like I epoxied it in place.
 
  #6  
Old 08-06-14, 06:32 PM
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Did you install plumber's putty under the flange inside the sink?
chandler's right.............next time use FRESH plumberer's putty.....i am an electrican in real life and when i set a sink....................most of the time my plumber's putty is half hard or worse (i have learned "half hard or worse" does not work.

do not use thread sealant ,Teflon tape,Teflon paste on the threads of the sink flange.

the threads on the sink flange are STRAIGHT, not tapered, and do not tighted like a water pipe coupling.

the water seal is the plumber's putty under the flange inside the sink.

NOW TO THE DRAIN UNDER THE SINK

do not use thread sealant ,Teflon tape,Teflon paste on the threads of the nuts that join the parts of the drain pipe under the sink.

the threads on the drain pipe(the big nuts) are STRAIGHT, not tapered, and do not tighted like a water pipe coupling.

the seal is by compression,with maybe a plastic washer.

but you need a new washer and a clean pipes..........i have learned that new drain pipes seal better.

"Unlike tapered threads, thread sealants should not be used with straight threads, and may actually interfere with proper installation, causing them to leak - or the sealant can act as a lubricant and make it hard to tell if the connection is overtightened. Connections should be firmly and securely tightened against the seal, but care should be taken to avoid over-tightening the joint. For metal fittings, hand tight plus 1/4 to 1/2 turn is usually sufficient. Plastic WingNut Fittings are designed to be hand tightened only, without the use of tools."
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-14, 06:06 AM
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All due respect Johnsc, but you don't know what you are talking about.

A drain body designed for a sink with overflow is wide open under the stopper Just look at any of the picutures attached in this link- Robot Check - there is a hole cut into the pipe to allow water from the overflow to get into the drain. Here is another link incase the original changes (linked to amazon) http://www.homedepot.com/p/MOEN-Lava...6107/203466092

Therefore, it matters not a hoot whether you have plumbers putty under the lip on the top side. That seal only prevents the sink itself from draining water, and has nothing to do with a leak found underneath at the large rubber washer. A leak underneath is either coming from an imperfection on the sink preventing a good seal to the washer or there is leakage at the threads. I've installed enough sinks to know that leakage at the threads can not be corrected by tightening. A little sealant on the shaft above the metal nut will stop this kind of leak.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 06:21 AM
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I agree with czizzi totally,
Plumbers putty or silicone under drain flange will not prevent leaks from rubber washer.
I have had even the finest quality pop up assemblies leak under rubber washer nut.
There's nothing wrong with applying pipe dope here. Tightening it, Under tightening it, or over tightening it won't work.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 07:33 AM
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30 years and never a leak. Plumbers putty and Teflon paste. ( If the pop up comes with a rubber washer for the top part I toss it in the garbage. I always use putty)


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  #10  
Old 08-07-14, 04:19 PM
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Teflon Paste is my friend. For drain leaks it's perfect. There are many imperfections in materials and this cures most if not all of them.

I don't use anything on supply lines.
 
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