Corner shower stall recommendations?

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  #1  
Old 01-20-15, 08:10 AM
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Question Corner shower stall recommendations?

These vary so much in price and I know that paying more doesn't always mean you get more. So my question is, how much do I have to spend to get a quality shower base and surround? I don't want the base to crack or feel flimsy. The two I was looking at are:

$800
http://bargain-outlets.com/sites/def...es/8016028.jpg

and

$399
http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pro...ac0a70_400.jpg

Does anyone have any other recommendations I should look at?
 
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Old 01-20-15, 12:21 PM
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The links are for a picture only. Do you have more information about them so we know which ones specifically you're considering?

If it has two curved doors that meet in the middle by sliding sideways I do not like it (I happened to be looking at it this weekend). There is only a door track on the top and bumpers on the bottom. It was difficult to slide the doors, especially change direction from opening to closing and it just did not have the feel worthy of the price.

The second one you linked is a very basic unit. Almost like comparing apples and oranges.
 
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Old 01-20-15, 12:40 PM
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Hi Pilot, here are the links to the two products. I'm not 100% on the doors but that does sound like what I remember seeing in person. The one at lowes I have not seen in person so I am not sure of the quality. It is for a basement turned studio inlaw type apartment. I'm trying to make it nice so I don't mind spending a little extra where it matters.

Shop ASB High Gloss White High-Impact Polystyrene Neo-Angle 3-Piece Corner Shower Kit (Actual: 70.75-in x 38-in x 38-in) at Lowes.com

MAAX NEO-ANGLE SURROUND SHOWER WALL TIGRIS | Bargain Outlet
 
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Old 01-20-15, 03:59 PM
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I think you need to go and try the showers you're considering as the "feel" and how the doors operate will have a lot to do with your impression. There are some very nice corner showers so I'm sure you can find something you'll like.

It's just funny that two days ago I was a thousand miles from home in a Menards killing time looking at the showers on display. The one similar to your first photo happened to be the only one that stuck in my mind.
 
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Old 01-20-15, 04:03 PM
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Yeah, I think your right. Best to go kick the tires on some display models. I'll definitely have a better look at the track system on those doors though. Other than that it seemed like a very nice unit.
 
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Old 01-20-15, 05:34 PM
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IMO youll be sorry with any neo angle corner shower... Your tenants will dislike it too..

I refuse to install any of them ever...

Put the biggest square/rectangle you can fit... go smaller with the sink if needed..

Sterling would be my choice for price and durability...
 
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Old 01-20-15, 05:43 PM
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Who carries sterling? I'd like to check them out.

NVM home depot does
 

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Old 01-20-15, 06:02 PM
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depot or lowes... They can order what you want...

example...

STERLING Ensemble 35-1/2 in. x 48 in. x 77 in. Curve Shower Kit in White-72220100-0 - The Home Depot


I personally have this one.. My 14 yr old who is 5' 10" and 200 lbs fits fine. lots of room.. I have not cleaned it since 2007 and it still looks new...

STERLING Ensemble 35-1/4 in. x 36 in. x 77 in. Shower Kit in White-72100100-0 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 01-20-15, 06:32 PM
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That rectangular one is nice. I'm working with a very limited space so I'm not sure a square or rectangular one would work. This is the bathroom with the vacuum lol. Pocket door will open on the far right, toilet front left corner, shower far left corner, sink far right corner.

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Old 01-21-15, 04:55 AM
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Is the sill plate of your framing pressure treated?

How big is the room? I'm guessing the studs on your back wall are spaced 12" so the room is about 50" wide. I'd be tempted to put a 48" shower with a curtain across the back wall and the toilet where you mentioned. Don't be afraid to consider having the toilet face right or to the shower. You could install a narrow sink and not a standard 19" or 22" deep vanity.

One thing I've seen in Europe is to have no sink in the bathroom. It's on the outside so one person can be in the bathroom and someone else can be outside using the sink.
 
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Old 01-21-15, 06:20 AM
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Yes the plates are pt. The room is 75" deep and 67" wide. I'm also working with an upflush pump that the sink, shower and toilet have to be connected to that will be located behind the left wall in a utility room.
 

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Old 01-21-15, 07:34 AM
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Will you be raising the floor of the whole room or are you digging a sump?
 
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Old 01-21-15, 07:44 AM
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Hi pilot, I will be using a saniflo upflush unit. the shower will be raised off of the floor but the rest of the floor will not be raised.
 
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Old 01-21-15, 11:16 AM
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So, I assume you've located a toilet with the waste line exiting from the rear. I also assume it means your toilet must have it's back up to the wall on the left.

Here are a couple layouts. Both use a 32" door.

This one shows a 38" neo angle shower and a 24" vanity. It would probably work best with a shallower 19" depth cabinet (I think the drawing shows a 22" depth).


Here is one with a 60" tub and a pedestal sink.
 
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Old 01-21-15, 01:11 PM
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Yes, you are correct. The toilet system ejects from the back through the wall.

I'd love to do the second setup but I don't think that code will allow for the very little space between the tub, vanity and toilet.

I had the codes somewhere but I can not find them. I am in Ma if you have any idea what the codes are here.
 
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Old 01-21-15, 02:05 PM
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I will be using a saniflo upflush unit.
Oh no!!!

3/4" outlet... Prone to failures...
 
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Old 01-21-15, 02:39 PM
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I believe you can use 3 quarter or half inch. Would I be better off using half inch??
 
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Old 01-21-15, 02:56 PM
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I believe you can use 3 quarter or half inch. Would I be better off using half inch??
You would be better off not installing that junk... Just my opinion though..

Put in a proper ejector pit would be my best advice...
 
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Old 01-21-15, 03:10 PM
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it's really my only option at this point.
 
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Old 01-21-15, 03:10 PM
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it's really my only option at this point.
Why is that????



My advice to you...

Liberty Pumps : Simplex Packages

http://www.libertypumps.com/Data/Sal.../Pro380web.pdf
 
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Old 01-21-15, 03:45 PM
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I understand there are better options but I already spent the money for the unit, permits and pipes runs. This was the more economical way for me to get a bathroom in the basement and also avoid potentially creating a inlet for water leakage from cutting into my foundation.

From what I have read, most of the problems with these units are from the installer either expecting things that the unit was not built to do or running 90 elbows instead of 2x45.
 
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Old 01-21-15, 03:59 PM
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We rented an apartment in Amsterdam a few years ago that had a system similar/identical to Saniflo. It worked but were always on a hair trigger for what got flushed down the toilet. If you were good to it it worked. Put one wrong thing in the toilet and you're having a bad day.

I have a basement Zoeller Qwik Jon sump system which uses a proper, big, honk'n cast iron sewage pump and outlets through a 2" line. We are careful with what we put in it but we have thrown some big multi day parties with lots of unsupervised people and children using the system and have not have a problem. Another nice feature is that it allows you to use a standard toilet. The drawback is the floor of your bathroom needs to be raised one step.

 
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Old 01-21-15, 04:14 PM
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OK .. Hope it works out for you... Just trying to save you from a huge mistake..

There are other options..

Liberty Pumps : Simplex Packages

The saniflos are a complicated design... Often issues are,

runs and makes a noise but doesnt empty? - blockage
runs constantly? - stuck microswitch
makes horrible noises? - foreign object in pump or cutter
runs and stops, runs and stops? - non return valve stuck
Doesnt empty well? - clogged



Its not just a simple grinding pump......

All my opinion and from experience servicing them in the feild.. If I get a call and there is one of these installed I refuse to take the call and repair/troubleshoot them anymore.....
 
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Old 01-21-15, 04:29 PM
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I appreciate it man, I know you're trying to help. I wonder how hard it would be to convert to one of these systems if the saniflo doesn't work. What size pipe do they use? I'm assuming it works the same way as the saniflo?
 
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Old 01-21-15, 05:36 PM
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Also, what do you think of these Liberty Pumps Ascent II? This uses a 1" pipe discharge like the saniflo.

Liberty Pumps : Macerating Toilet Systems
 
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Old 01-22-15, 10:55 AM
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In general I don't like "small" systems of any brand because: A small tank requires the pump to cycle on/off more frequently which is usually not good for the motor. A small discharge pipe requires the waste to be ground to smaller pieces and the smaller passage is easier to clog. It also places a greater burden on the pump as it has to do more grinding in addition.

Because these small systems are sorta pushed to the limit trying to cram everything into a small package they are not very tolerant. My pump is massive overkill but it has large passages and can handle up to 2" solids. Then the check valve is located about 4' up so if a piece of string or anything get's caught in the pump it very unlikely it can stream behind and prevent the check valve from closing. A small package system can and do work. They just are not as tolerant of abuse and with such a small tank you're always just one flush away from a mess.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 11:54 AM
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Ok, now you guys have me rethinking this whole thing. I am not 100% sure how these sewage ejector pits work.Is it as simple as this? Two pipe lines set into the concrete floor ( one for the shower and one for the toilet) that lead to one of these simplex type sewage systems that are also set into the concrete floor. Then the discharge pipe is run straight up through the cieling floor joists and gravity fed to the sewer line??

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Old 01-22-15, 01:13 PM
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The kind of systems we've been talking about are all above the concrete slab. "Small" systems are typically right behind the toilet and use a rear ejecting toilet (hard to find) and the sink and shower gravity flow into the small sump. They are easy to retrofit because there is no cutting of concrete and no plumbing in the concrete slab.

The system I linked is a step up from that and still keeps all the piping above the slab. It uses a larger sump and a standard toilet sits directly on top of the tank. Shower and sink flow by gravity to the sump. This setup does require the entire bathroom floor or at least the toilet area to be elevated on step up but it uses a full size pump and piping.

Next up again is a proper ejector pit. What I think you refereed to as a simplex. You cut through the concrete and bury a sump with a pump. You also cut concrete to run drain lines below the slab conventionally then pour concrete to repair the floor. It's best because it leaves the bathroom floor flush with no steps, uses a standard toilet and a full size ejector pump and piping.

All of the systems have the effluent/poo pipe going up to a high point then hopefully any horizontal runs have fall until it meets your houses main sewer line. "Small" systems generally use a much smaller poo pipe. 3/4" or 1" is much easier to snake through existing construction at the expense of greater chance of clogging. The last two methods generally use 2" which is less prone to clogging but requires more room to route through studs and ceiling joists.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 01:29 PM
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Thanks for that detailed explanation. I really appreciate all the help. If all I have to do is cut in for the two drains and sewer pit, I believe I could do the work myself. I thought I had to have the sewer pit right next to the sewer line? Which is maybe 15 feet away and not in an ideal place for the pit. The pump and pit should really be the only cost other than running pipe correct? So I could get out of this for under $1000. Am I missing anything I should take into consideration?
 
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Old 01-22-15, 01:50 PM
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The only thing is the vent line.. The vent comes off the toilet. The shower ties into that under the slap. The sink ties into the shower line. And the sink needs to be vented somewhere..

Im not even sure how you were going to vent the other unit you were looking at...

I can draw you up something..

What bath configuration were you considering? Still with the corner shower?
 
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Old 01-22-15, 02:04 PM
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I'm not sure how it was going to be vented either. My guess is straight out the side of the house like the vent for my drier and Rinnai water heater are Hidden behind my chimney. Actually I would like to put a full tub and shower straight across the back wall if code allows. I still cant find the code requirements for elbow room around the toilet and sink.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 02:09 PM
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There is a sticky here with plumbing codes... Find what your state follows and read some... I cant recall off top of my head...

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pl...ing-codes.html
 
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Old 01-23-15, 07:38 PM
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I took a look at those codes and I'm not 100% but I think it was saying 15"0n both sides of the toilet for a 30" radius?

Now I'm looking at the ProVoreŽ 380. It is the same unit as the Pro 380 but with a grinder pump. Do you guys not recommend the grinder pumps at all?
 
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Old 01-24-15, 05:47 AM
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Check to make sure but the 15" is usually from the centerline or the center of the drain flange. So you need a 30" wide space for the toilet. Toilets are about 18" wide which leaves about 6" on either side.

That (ProVore 380) looks like a good setup. The pump seems like a monster. I would preffer it with a 1/2 hp motor just to help prevent the lights in the house from dimming when the sewage pump turns on but it (the 1hp) looks more than capable of the job. And that setup looks to be using relatively standard parts (pump and float switches) so it should be easy to maintain long term.
 
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Old 01-24-15, 11:32 AM
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ok that makes sense. I'm going to ask my plumber friend about code. I'm also going to see if he has any interest in the nib Saniflo :/ I know he uses them sometimes. the Saniflo unit I purchased is also 1hp so I figured I needed that?

Maybe the ProVor is overkill. Looking on liberty s site it appears that the pump in the simplex systems are interchangeable so I could upgrade to a ProVor later with not much hassle if necessary.
 
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Old 01-24-15, 03:53 PM
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How much use will this bathroom receive? If you've already got the Saniflo I'd be tempted to stick with it. They do work but it's not as tolerant of Hot Wheels cars and Barbie dolls. If you can educate whoever uses it to flush nothing more than poo, pee and TP it will work fine.
 
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Old 01-24-15, 04:56 PM
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Well I plan on renting it out as some extra income because I live alone in a 3 bedroom house with a soon to be finished basement. I have no way of telling if the person will follow my directions or not other than holding a security deposit over their head and letting them know the do's and don'ts.

I read somewhere in the amazon reviews, that someone uses 2" plumbing with these with no problems. Do you think there would be any problems with that? It would make converting to a sewer pit a lot easier if the right size pipes were already run.
 
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Old 01-24-15, 06:05 PM
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OK I cant offer anymore adice...

Put in your system and it may or may not be a nightmare for you... IDK. I dont know who you are going to have using the bath...

Just my opinion was the bath is open... do it proper now or you may be saying what you should have done...

If you feel happy with what your doing, then do it... I cannot foresee the future..


I would rather have a tank that I can open, unclogg the pump, or change the pump and float switch for an issue rather then go through the hassle of a complicated system like that... I have done it, I have seen it,,,, been there done that so they say...

Good luck on your reno and let us know how it goes...



Here is why I will not work on or install these... Id rather just pull a pump...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZ1rBxESEhU
 
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Old 03-14-15, 01:33 PM
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lawrosa, I think I am going to cut out the concrete this weekend for the preparation of a proper sewage pit. Do you have any tips or suggestions that may help me as a first timer? do's and don'ts?
 
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Old 03-16-15, 02:48 PM
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Decided to rent a jack hammer and make a day out of it. I guess I will try and sell the saniflo on craigslist. Thanks for the help guys.


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