Second floor shower pressure

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Old 08-16-15, 03:44 AM
mik
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Second floor shower pressure

I just bought a 60-year old house that has 2 full baths supplied by a 30 gal. hot water heater. The water pressure in the 1st floor shower is outstanding- like getting sandblasted with water. The water pressure in the 2nd floor shower is lackluster- not much pressure. When I moved in the place needed everything stripped out & replaced/ nearly a complete gut. But the 2nd floor shower had some kind of (decades old?) adapter screwed onto the neck and I stripped it off & threw it away but now I'm thinking that it somehow increased the pressure in that shower. Is there some device/adapter that I can attach to increase pressure in that shower?
 
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Old 08-16-15, 04:06 AM
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Was all the plumbing replaced with the gut job? if not, do you know what type of piping you have?

I live on top of a hill and have low water pressure so I installed a small low flow shower head that makes it feel like it has more pressure - I'm not sure why. Have you checked your water pressure with a gauge?
 
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Old 08-16-15, 05:55 AM
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Try removing the shower head and clean it's restrictor or aerator. It may be clogged with sediment.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 06:28 AM
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I have not had the time yet to get to reno the bathrooms but they are supplied by copper piping. I did install a brand new showerhead in the 2nd floor shower just to see if that helped (I removed the restrictor from it) and the pressure improved a little but it's still very much less than the 1st floor shower. I don't have a gauge to check the pressure but may buy one today; either way the pressure is noticeably lower than the other shower.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 06:58 AM
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Likely not a pressure issue, bet it's a flow issue.
I use all 3/4" for main supply lines, before stepping down for the supply's.
A 3/4" line will have nearly twice the avalible CFM'S.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 10:19 AM
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I'd mainly want to verify that the pressure on the main floor is good. If the pressure is a little low but ok on the main floor it may not have enough once it goes higher. I was mostly concerned that you might have old galvanized pipes which are notorious for corroding and restricting the flow.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 03:05 PM
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the supply to both showers is 1/2 copper"
 
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Old 08-16-15, 03:32 PM
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Ever tried standing on a garden hose when watering the lawn?
It has the same effect.
What size line is feeding the water heater?
Just can not imagine someone installing just a 30 gal tank for two full bathrooms.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 01:14 PM
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joe- I can't imagine anyone running romex throughout the house without tacking it to any floor joists or studs on its path to the panel box but that's also what I've found here (just left it hanging at head level in many places). I can't imagine anyone going into the basement to build a 'bar' and sealing off the concrete block walls with plastic sheeting, then covering it all with OSB. (wanna talk mold problems?! ha) I can't imagine anyone using stranded stereo speaker wire to create a pigtail for the ground wire in a wall outlet.
I hope I didn't sound like a smart aleck because wasn't my intent- I'm tackling one mystery at a time and keeping my chin up that there's a light at the end of this renovation tunnel.
I agree that it is very probably a flow issue and I'll pursue that, so thanks for the input from everyone on this.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 04:22 PM
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So your attacking me for all the flaws you've found. Hmm.
We own 3 houses, all has what the hell where they thinking issues.
A 3/4" line has about twice the flow of a 1/2 line, simple as that.
If there's just two people living there and that extra bathroom is just a guest bathroom then 30 gal. may be fine if the timings right.
 
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Old 09-09-15, 05:22 PM
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Joe- was not attacking you at all if it sounded that way! I was only trying to describe the complete picture of things that I keep discovering here and scratching my head asking myself, "what the...?" No insult intended whatsoever; this site is an awesome resource for advice from moderators and other members. Small gains, little at a time, keep checking things off the reno "to-do" list.
 
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Old 09-09-15, 06:33 PM
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Give us more info to work on. If copper supply to the bath you should not have an flow restrictions. Must be something else. What do the shower handles and/or diverter look like? Could the restriction of partial clog be there? How does the sink perform in relation to the shower?
 
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