First time home buyer question

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Old 02-17-16, 07:24 AM
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First time home buyer question

we are in the process of buying a new home and we would like to tile the kitchen floor. Currently it is hardwood floor, we are going to paint the cabinetry but leave it in the configuration that it is in.

We want to install ceramic tile floors and we are concerned about having to tile around the cabinets, would it be better to remove the cabinets and paint them and tile underneath and reinstall them, or should we tile around them. Another concern is whether the dishwasher will fit with the tile etc.

Any advice is appreciated.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 07:58 AM
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Your concerns are valid but let's start at the basics: what are the size, spacing and unsupported span of the floor joists and what is the composition of the flooring currently in place?
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:00 AM
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We're all about DIY so it comes down to how much you want to bite off. We're here to help if you choose to do this yourself.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:02 AM
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Just to be clear you don't just uninstall a tub and replace it. This is normally part of a bath rm gut and remodel. Any wall tile next to the tub has to be removed first.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:04 AM
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Might depend somewhat on the actual location/construction/type fixtures (fiberglass/ceramic) and other variables like tile, etc, but generally DIY-able as SS says.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:06 AM
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Mark types faster than I do.
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:22 AM
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One other detail, is this your only bathroom/shower? Since it will take longer for a new DIY you will need an alternative, trust me.

On most of the renovation shows you will notice they start with the demolition and as Mark said, they are doing a full remodel.

The best approach is to do your homework as to what you want. Then search for a good dependable contractor and get a quote. With that in hand you will know more about what needs to be done and be able to decide between DIY and hiring someone to do the install.

IMO. it can be a DIY, but it is not a small project. Also, check with those friends and family to see how interested they are in getting involved.

Bud
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:23 AM
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As others have mentioned I think a lot depends on your intentions. Simply removing the tub is relatively simple. Maybe hard work but pretty simple none the less. What you choose to do after the tub is removed is the big question. Is the current one damaged or the wrong color and you just want to swap it out for something similar or do you want to rip out the alcove and go back in with a walk in shower, heavy glass and floor to ceiling tile?
 
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Old 02-17-16, 08:29 AM
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In addition to structural issues a big concern is whether or not the dishwasher will fit. Best would be to completely gut the kitchen and even possibly remove the hardwood. The would minimize the build up in height so you don't have a big elevation difference with the rooms adjoining the kitchen. Depending on how you do the project one thing will not change. You do not put tile directly on wood. You must install another material like cement board or Hardie Backer to your wood subflooring. That then provides a stable base and a surface to which the thinset can adhere. So, when considering how much thickness tiling will add I generally use 1"+ as a quick guess. 1/2" for the backer board, 1/8"+ thinset and 1/4-1/2" tile thickness.
 
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