How to replace toilet water inlet valve?

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Old 05-04-16, 04:09 PM
J
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How to replace toilet water inlet valve?

I'm replacing a toilet, and the new toilet has "side walls" that hide the drain behind the bowl. Unfortunately, it appears one of these walls will foul my water supply line where it comes out of the wall. I really don't want to pack up the toilet and return it for another model. It looks like it will work if I replace the angle valve at the end of the pipe with a straight valve, and maybe shorten the pipe stub by an inch or so. A straight valve will allow me to turn the handle on the side of the pipe instead of in a tight gap behind the toilet "wall"

The problem is, I don't know how to remove the valve. It appears it is brazed in as I don't see any threads or flats on the valve to indicate it is threaded, nor has any compression nut. All the youtube videos I found show these valves installed with compression nuts. Maybe I'm missing something. If it's brazed, and I don't have any experience brazing plumbing joints, is this something I could learn easy enough? Or is there no chance it is brazed and I just don't know how it connects?

I've attached pictures of the supply line/valve, and the back view of the new toilet. The end of the valve is 5.5" from the wall, and I think the back of the new toilet will be 5" from the wall. The inlet edge of the valve is 3" from the wall.

Any suggestions for how I can do this myself, or if I shouldn't even attempt it? I'm mechanically inclined, but with little plumbing experience. I'm hesitant to learn in a situation that may leave me unable to turn my water back on if I don't get it right! But if it truly should be simple, I'd like to give it a shot.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 04:34 PM
J
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It's soldered, not brazed.
That pipe was way to long and the escutcheon plate needed to be replaced anyway.
Shut off the main water coming into the house, open up the cold water faucet until the water stops flowing, flush the toilet.
Disconnect that old supply line and toss it in the trash.
Cut the line with a tubing cutter.
Clean up the line with emery paper until it's all copper showing.
Install a new 1/2" compression 1/4 turn shut off valve.
Install a new braided supply line.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 04:41 PM
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Easiest would be to install a compression inlet valve. I would use an angle stop and not a straight valve.
You need a 1/2" nominal compression inlet x 3/8" compression angle or straight valve, and a tubing cutter.

- Turn off the water to the house and drain the pipe using the existing valve and a bucket or pan.
- Cut the pipe about 2" from wall. Sand the pipe with emery cloth and remove burs from inside.
- Slide the new compression nut onto the pipe, followed by the ferrule (compression ring). Before placing the ferrule onto the pipe, smear a little pipe dope on the inside surface of the ring.

- Slide the valve onto the pipe and tighten the compression nut. Do not over tighten the nut or it will leak. Tighten the nut until the ferrule grabs the pipe, just enough where it will not slide off easily. After the ferrule grabs, tighten 1/2 turn more and check for leaks. Tighter is not better.

Edit: I got in after Joe, but we're on the same page...
 
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Old 05-04-16, 04:50 PM
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It'll cost more but you can use a Sharkbite valve and avoid the compression altogether. Much easier.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 05:25 PM
J
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Thanks for the instructions, Joe and Brian! That definitely is in my wheelhouse to do myself. Thinking I would have to braze a good joint on my first attempt made me hesitant. Just curious, Joe, why do you recommended the angle stop valve vs. the straight valve?

Also, I've seen a 1/4-turn valve option too. I can see this being easier to cycle on and off if the space is tight between the valve and back of the toilet, since the center of the pipe is dead-nuts on the center of the toilet wall. Are there any pros or cons between the 1/4-turn and multi-turn valves?
 
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Old 05-04-16, 10:19 PM
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With an angle stop the hose goes straight up, not sticking out away from the wall and showing more.
A 1/4 turn is far faster to shut off and is a ball valve so less likely to leak.
 
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