Advice on vintage tub install??

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Old 09-08-16, 01:24 PM
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Advice on vintage tub install??

I can't find an exact answer to my question and so I figured I would ask here.

There was an old cast iron tub installed in my bathroom and the installer simply sat the tub on 2x4's. I can't find instructions on how these were meant to be mounted.

I assume that a cleat is installed on the wall and back of the tub rested on that? But I am not positive.

I plan to redo the entire bathroom with a a claw foot in the future but need this tub to not fall/collapse/etc in the mean time.

Photos of the tub...

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Old 09-08-16, 07:02 PM
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I can't help you with how it's mounted but it looks like it could be a fall issue. If it fell it would probably not be damaged. Those tubs are tough. Someone could be hurt though.

I am a little leery about putting all that weight in one small area. When the tub is in it's normal position.... the weight is spread out along the floor and joists. Now you have all the weight in one small area.

If you aren't going to be using it..... why not get it out of there ?
 
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Old 09-08-16, 07:54 PM
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Not going to want a shower? (big selling point)
Claw foots look cool but going to cause a bunch of issues.
Trying to clean under them, proper support for the feet.
Cost or having to replumb all the drains and supplys.
 
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Old 09-09-16, 02:35 AM
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Most likely this design tub sat on cleats around the three walls in the surround. Those cleats along with the skirt provide a substantial amount of support. Don't lift the tub higher than the skirt touching the floor.
 
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Old 09-09-16, 04:16 AM
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At least you can take some comfort in knowing that the tub weighs about 600 pounds less while empty than it would if you filled it with water or put a human body in it. Empty, it doesn't look too scary.
 
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Old 09-09-16, 06:32 AM
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In my old houses tubs like that rest on the floor or blocks underneath the tub with no cleats on the walls. If I have to do work underneath like replacing floor boards without removing the tub I'll pack mortar underneath to fill the gap and provide even support for the bottom of the tub.
 
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Old 09-09-16, 08:38 PM
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@ PJmax

I agree, I need to set it down, its been like that for awhile now. That is a supporting wall and the tub is leaning a bit so it isn't likely to fall. I had to haul it out of the bathroom by myself...and just couldn't get the strength to lower it

@ joecaption

Yes a shower would be nice! A dream would be to have a ran shower coming down into a claw foot. I may be a man but I LOVE soaking in a hot bath after a long day. hehe I am already having to re plumbing EVERYTHING! I just dug a 100ft 2ft deep trench to run a new water line and I'm working on digging up the old pitch pipe sewer line to replace it with PVC..

@ chandler

That is how I was thinking it should also be installed, so the weight is distributed evenly around the tub.

@ Vermont

Don't even remind me about the weight when filled! I am praying that the three floor joist the tub was sitting on are still strong enough to hold the weight. I will attempt to brace the floor from underneath with blocks n such until I can get better structure in there. I really don't want to drop into the crawl space like in the movie The Money Pit..

@ Pilot Dane

That is how this tub was done, I have seen the mortar done on fiberglass tubs but didn't know if that work on cast iron...


So it seems, that I'll just use a cleat on the wall and blocks under the tub. See if that gets me by for a year or so...I can't install cleats on all three sides as partitioning wall is rotted bad and the bathroom is bigger then the tub. Here's a before..Cuz I know how everyone likes to see a good abandon bathroom

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Old 09-10-16, 04:42 AM
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Ah, you're going to use the belt and suspenders method.

I'm not saying just supporting the tub on the bottom is the best method. Back when they were installed was long before building codes. I get involved when the tub has leaked and rotted out the floor. It's often concealed by the tub and the first indication of trouble is when the tub starts sinking at one end.
 
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Old 09-10-16, 05:26 AM
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Just looking at that original bathroom design (the to-be-abandoned picture) makes me appreciate some of the features . . . . like the toilet paper roll conveniently mounted on the bathtub control panel . . . . and then my eyes noticed that the toilet tank appears to be off-set, skewed to the right, instead of centered like most conventional tanks. That must have been exciting; you don't see many like that !

Is that true . . . . or is it an optical illusion ?
 
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Old 09-10-16, 04:41 PM
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@ Pilot Dane

Hey when dealing with a hundred and fifty year old house built out of the remains of another house...one "may" have to suspend a few things

@ Vermont

Here's a picture after it was "cleaned" a bit, and one can see the lovely carpet used I want to say, it is just an illusion but the tank was loose from the bowl(bad seal) and so it could actually be crocked. Oh and btw that is vintage blue toilet paper

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Here's a during deconstruction, and what was behind the paneling...

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And here's where I am now, seriously peeling back the layers of history on this bathroom..

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