Toilet Shutoff Valve Connection Type

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Old 10-24-16, 10:02 AM
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Toilet Shutoff Valve Connection Type

There may not be a standard answer for this, but are toilet supply pipes coming out from the wall typically smooth or threaded on the end? I want to change all my multi-turn shutoff valves to 1/4 turns and need to know whether to buy compression or threaded valves. There is a nut on the current multi-turns, so I know they aren't sweated on. I can't see any unused threads on the pipe stubs, so I'm guessing they are compression, but can't be sure. Is there any way to tell without just taking them off?
 
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Old 10-24-16, 10:40 AM
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You'll have to look at the pipe coming out of your wall to see what you'll need. Both galvanized steel with a threaded end and copper which got sweated (soldered) or a compression fitting are both common. So, the material your pipe is made of can be a good indication.
 
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Old 10-24-16, 04:53 PM
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To go along with what PD said, sometimes plumber will solder a threaded valve. If it's copper you can always use the Shark-Bite valves if enough of the bare pipe sticks out from the wall.
 
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Old 10-24-16, 05:29 PM
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It sounds like you have standard 1/2" copper water pipes in the home with standard compression angle stops. The copper will be rigid and can be easily scraped or sanded to look shiny.

I can't see any unused threads on the pipe stubs
On a compression nut, you won't see threads on the wall stub out (it's smooth copper).
You will see a few exposed male threads of the valve body towards the toilet side.
 
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Old 10-24-16, 09:04 PM
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OK, I cleaned off the inlet from the wall a bit and it's copper. Here's a picture.

Attachment 72348

Safe to assume that's compression, so I can go ahead and order my valves? I'm thinking of going with BrassCraft KT series, or I've also just found Dahl. Anyone have a preference between those two?
 
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Old 10-25-16, 05:36 AM
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Your picture link is not working.
 
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Old 10-25-16, 07:46 AM
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Thanks, trying again...
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Old 10-25-16, 08:08 AM
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That is a compression fitting. I'm partial to Brass Craft but not all valves will have the same thread on the compression nut so if you can find a valve with the same name as on the handle of the existing valve you have a better chance of swapping valves without needing to cut the copper and fit a new compression nut and ferrule.
 
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Old 10-25-16, 09:18 AM
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Thanks for the confirmation, Furd. The existing multi-turns are BrassCraft, but in any case, I'm not planning on reusing the compression nut and ferrule, so don't think I need to worry about matching the brands. More concerned with getting the best valve.
 
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Old 10-25-16, 09:48 AM
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I don't buy angle stops at home stores unless in a hurry.
If there's a Ferguson plumbing supply in your area, use the Mainline valves.
 
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Old 10-25-16, 04:22 PM
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There is an easier solution if there is no problem with your existing valve other than it's not a quarter turn. Valve manufacturers make a quarter turn piggy back valve that screws directly to the outlet of your existing valve after removing the tank fill line. The outlet of the piggy back valve is threaded for attaching a tank fill line. Keeney K2072PCLF is one such valve. It has a 3/8 inlet and 3/8 outlet. The outlet has a nut and ferrule that you can use to connect a tube type fill line.
I would go with a flex line. Since the toilet tank to shut off valve distance has been decreased by about 2 inches, I would suggest a flex line of sufficient length that results in a nice loop between the toilet tank and new valve with out kinking. Hope this helps.
 
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Old 10-25-16, 07:40 PM
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Make life easy. Remove old valve and install a Shark bite. No screwing, compression or soldering.
 
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Old 10-25-16, 08:36 PM
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It appears your supply line is compression but be sure it is if you don't want to replace it.
 
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Old 10-27-16, 01:58 PM
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My original plan was to replace the riser tubes with braided flex lines, but I like the look of the risers better I think. Maybe I'll see if I can reuse them. If not, I'll just use flex lines. Did a quick measure yesterday, and I think 9" lines may fit perfectly, without having any curves/loops, so might not look too bad.

Thanks all for the feedback!
 
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