Shower door install - wall jamb not flush at bottom corner

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Old 01-30-17, 01:57 PM
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Shower door install - wall jamb not flush at bottom corner

I'm ready to install the sliding glass doors on a one-piece fiberglass shower, but I'm thrown off by the rounded edge where the wall jamb meets the bottom track. I checked the same shower upstairs installed by pros when we built the house, but all they did was install the jambs to the bottom and filled the gap created by the corner (at least 1/4") with silicone - looks sloppy as hell. Is this normal practice or how else can you do it?
 
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Old 01-30-17, 03:17 PM
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Generally you would take the bottom piece and either cut it short, or grind it rounded to match the curvature of the base. The instruction sheet will show you the options for a curved bottom.
 
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Old 01-30-17, 03:33 PM
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I would not cut t short but cut the piece full length to meet the flat part of the tile. THEN either knotch a 45 degree cut out of the bottom corner or grind it to match the profile. Don't be lazy and slobber a bunch of caulk in there, make it look polished and finished.
 
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Old 01-30-17, 08:22 PM
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The shower was purchased from one supplier who then sent me to a different supplier for the glass doors. The installation sheet for the glass doors shows two configurations, one on top of a tub and the other on top of a shower pan - both are squared corners with no option for a curved bottom.

I've already cut the bottom track 1/4" shorter than the opening (instructions called for 1/8") and it still sits up a bit on either end, but I don't want to go any shorter than that if possible. I'm concerned that if I shape the jambs to fit the curve I'll mess up the chrome finish, but it doesn't sound like I have any other options? Would I just use a grinding wheel for that?
 
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Old 01-31-17, 04:10 AM
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I would use a stationary wheel and move the rail by hand into it. It could be something as small as a sander with 100 or 80 grit paper to a grinder held in a vice with a metal wheel in it. Be careful and move slowly.
 
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