Several tub questions

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Old 02-14-17, 07:27 AM
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Several tub questions

I started a "remove the carpet from the bathroom" project that snowballed. At this point, I've noticed several problems with the tub that I would like to address;

This appears to be a standard built-in without any sort of "Bathfitter". I have access to a panel and noticed that the plumbing is not very secure (four nails sort of press against the plumbing to hold it in place), and the area around the tub is a wide open cavity. Also, the three piece surround is well adhered to the wall, but there the pieces overlap (five inches on each side along the back, they are not secure at all.

1) Should I put some sort of fill in the void around the tub for insulating? If so, would any loose fill work, or should I use Roxul?

2) Can the center panel be easily removed and reinstalled with the correct adhesive, or is taking it down going to destroy it and require me to get a new surround. (this would not make me cry at all).

3) If I don't have to take down the surround, then I can try to add bracing to the plumbing from behind. However, I'm not sure I can do that for the loose shower head. If I'm not tiling, can whatever hole I put in to secure the shower head be patched with drywall, or is that a cement-board area?

4) The tub itself has some sort of substance on it that tears apart my sponge. It's possible that the yahoos I brought in for an emergency ceiling drywall job spattered compound or paint on it. But it could have been there well before they did their lousy job. What sort of chemicals, etc. can I use to try to remove whatever is there without damaging the coating of the tub itself?

Thank you,
 
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Old 02-14-17, 09:22 AM
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1. You can insulate around the tub if you wish. It might be worth the effort if someone takes long soaks in the tub but if it's mostly used as a shower then you probably wouldn't notice.

2. Whether or not you can remove the center panel all depends on how well it's stuck on. I would not touch it unless you are prepared to install a new surround. You may start pulling and prying on the center and break it and then you're committed to replacing.

3. It all depends on how your walls are constructed. We can't see what you have so we can't tell you what material your walls are made of. A safer bet would be to come at if from the other side of the wall as that is more likely to be simple sheetrock.

4. Again, it depends on what you've got. What is your tub made of? How old is the tub? Have the rough bits always been there or it something that started recently?
 
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Old 02-14-17, 11:09 AM
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1) Any concern of mold, or can I use whatever insulation I want?

2) What about getting the correct adhesive and forcing it behind the loose panel? Would that make future removal more difficult or be a bad idea for any other reason?

3) I'll give the safer bet a try and hope there's enough room to secure it.

4) No idea what it's made of (but my guess is ceramic coating). No idea of the age. I do not recall having my cleaning implements torn up before, but I would have cleaned it once at most before it was rented. As I said, I know it's happening now, I know I had some rather sloppy workers come in and do a very fast sheetrock job. I do not know if there is a causal relationship, though.
 
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Old 02-14-17, 03:54 PM
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1. Mold is always a possibility in wet areas. If the area under the tub is dry you can use about anything you want. Unfaced fiberglass batt may may be the easiest to shove and tuck into place.

2. If you can pull the center panel back enough to get in with the tip of a caulking tube then that would be an option. There are adhesives specifically for tub surrounds. If water has been getting behind the middle panel make sure you clean both surfaces to remove any dirt and soap residue before gluing.

3. Was this a rental house? If so it could be anything in the tub. If it were sheetrock mud it will be white and soften pretty easily with water. You'll just have to get down close and see what it is. It could be damage to the surface or some kind of glue or crud. If the tub is enameled cast iron or steel then you can try scraping with a putty knife or single edge razor. The metal blade may leave a gray streak of metal on the tub surface but that can be removed with a mild abrasive cleaner.
 
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Old 02-15-17, 05:32 AM
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Thanks. I'll spend some time with a putty knife.
 
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