Replacing shut off valve on toilet- would you use compression or shark

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  #1  
Old 06-07-17, 01:10 PM
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Replacing shut off valve on toilet- would you use compression or shark

You guys of been great helping me with my toilet I think this may be the last post about it I want to replace the multi turn shut off valve it's very hard to turn. I'm thinking compression fitting have a quarter turn valve. But they have the push connect/shark bite kind of connector besides the standard compression fitting

I'm at Home Depot right now 10 bucks for the push to connect? nine dollars for the standard compression. So the price is kind of a wash. It's a tight space to work in so I guess I'm looking for ease of installation, along with reliability.

I used the push to connect somewhere else under kitchen sink I think and it was a breeze to use. Are they as reliable? Person with long-term fears here. I guess I'll buy both right now & return what I don't use? They have an O ring in there and there's plastic parts. somehow that just makes me think it's not is good is metal to metal but I'm on here asking your advice so what do I know!!!
 
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Old 06-07-17, 07:07 PM
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I vote for the 1/4 turn valve & the push connector.
 
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Old 06-07-17, 07:13 PM
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shorty - i wasn't even doubting that part of the issue.

I'm wondering whether to use the compression fitting version of the 1/4 turn valve or the push to connect version. both are metal shells, but the innards of the push to connect is plastic and likey has an oring in it. easier to install I think than compression, but oring / plastic don't stand up like metal ferrule & nut would?
 
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Old 06-07-17, 07:14 PM
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I had edited my post while you were responding. Look at it again.
 
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Old 06-07-17, 07:30 PM
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I trust the sharkbite valves. Sharkbite fittings are also approved for in-wall use (not valves) so no need to be concerned with leaks if installed properly.

Ensure the pipe is round with no burs and push on to a depth of ~7/8", measure and mark the pipe with a pencil before pushing on to ensure a proper depth.

Added: you also must have enough pipe to work with. You might need to cut the pipe back past the old ferrule, the pipe cannot have any depressions and old ferrules are sometimes way too tight to pull off.
 
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Old 06-07-17, 07:37 PM
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thanks for the comments.

further overthinking - sharkbite is a brand.

Handyone - you are OK with the sharkbite style in general, not necessarily the brand?

it's on a brasscraft valve (didn't look at the small print on the box to see if it says something about it's a patented design licensed from sharkbite or similar words.)
 
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Old 06-07-17, 07:44 PM
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Yes, I'm OK with any brand. Lowes and HD sell different brands, but they are all proven.
 
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Old 06-08-17, 03:22 AM
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I work at a home improvement store. I always recommend the Sharkbite type of fitting. They d work are reliable. Although, for myself I would not use them inside a wall. That's just me.
 
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