What to do with extra dishwasher drain hose?

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Old 06-18-17, 01:02 PM
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What to do with extra dishwasher drain hose?

I just replaced an old yucky dishwasher drain hose. My sink doesn't have an air gap, so I went with the high loop method of running it to the garbage disposal. The only challenge is I had some extra hose, so I coiled it up and also kept it above the disposal drain. See a picture of it below.

Is this the best way to manage this extra hose?

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Old 06-18-17, 02:33 PM
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The extra hose has no bearing on the performance of the drain line. What you have done is fine.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 04:12 PM
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Sweet, that's what I was hoping to hear. Thanks!
 
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Old 06-18-17, 04:32 PM
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Personally, I would recommend you reroute the drain line. You might have a problem with water standing in the hose and smelling, and possible shallow standing water in the DW.
I would drill a hole at the far back bottom right.
The hose should exit the DW opening low and then go up to the loop inside the sink base cabinet.
Keeping the hose low and then up allows it to empty as much as possible and let air in.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 05:31 PM
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Brian, the hose is high already and then looped and held in place. I see nothing wrong with what has been done. The hose exits the dishwasher low, goes high up through the cabinet, loops around and then enters the disposal. Looks great to me. How is exiting at the base of the cabinet going to make a difference?
 
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Old 06-18-17, 05:53 PM
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Didn't mean to contradict and don't like to. To me, the hose should not go straight up inside the dishwasher opening. Every time I have seen this method, laying the hose low fixes the problem of odors and standing water. All instructions also state hole at bottom of cabinet.

I look at it as if the hose goes vertical immediately inside the DW opening it will hold water like a trap. If the hose lays low for a few feet and then goes up, it will empty about 1/2 way (half high) and let air in to partially dry the hose.

I don't know if it's relevant, but I save these responses from manufacturers and it's good info. To me an air gap should always be used even if not required, although a loop is better than nothing.

?Kenmore: “The high loop or air gap must be used to prevent potential backflow contamination of the dishwasher. Local plumbing codes generally dictate the requirements in your area. Section 807.4 of the Uniform Plumbing Code states: “No domestic dishwashing machine shall be directly connected to a drainage system or food waste disposer without the use of an approved dishwasher airgap fitting on the discharge side of the dishwashing machine. Listed airgaps shall be installed with the flood level (FL) marking at or above the flood level of the sink or drainboard, whichever is higher, or separately trapped with the airbreak located on the stand pipe.”

?GE: “If an air gap is not required, the drain hose must have the high loop from the floor to prevent backflow of water into the dishwasher or water siphoning out during operation.”
?Bosch: The high loop in the drain hose of your dishwasher is to keep water from settling in the hose if it were hanging down any lower or horizontally. This keeps the drain hose dried out and keeps any odors from backing up into the dishwasher.

?Viking: In testing our dishwashers, we have found that the additional high loop in the back of the dishwasher is required for proper draining of the water. We have seen when this piece is not applied that over time the consumer will have issues with the water back up and causing issues with proper drainage and water pooling in a particular area.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 06:26 PM
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I know air gaps are required where you are Brian, but not here. We are only recommended to go a high loop before the disposal. So weather the start of the high starts in the dishwasher cabinet and comes through high or weather it sneaks low through the cabinet and still goes high shouldn't make a difference. Being High before the drain will prevent backflow to the dishwasher in the event of a back up in the disposal. I think we are on the same page, Just some different requirements between CA and AR and of course where I am in VA.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 06:50 PM
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I think we have answered the question.
Anyone interested in why air gaps are necessary can research "backflow devices" or "protection of Fresh water supplies".
 
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Old 06-18-17, 08:27 PM
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That extra coil of hose at the top does not make for an ideal condition.
It basically operates as a trap now.

It would be better cut off or left behind the dishwasher.
 
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Old 06-19-17, 02:07 AM
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I appreciate the information and dialogue we have going here. Thanks everyone.
 
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