Keeney toilet shut off valve leaking

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Old 10-02-17, 09:22 AM
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Keeney toilet shut off valve leaking

I removed and replaced a 16 year old shut off valve with a Keeney compression valve. In the beginning, the valve was leaking 1 drop per second and I managed to tighten the valve to where the drop is about every 30 min. Bottom line; the valve is still leaking.

I understood that I am to turn it 1/4 turn after finger tightening but had to go past that rule. Also, not supposed to add any dope, putty, sealant, etc. to the threads and let the olive do the work? Not sure if I need to tighten it more. If so, won't the reverse happen and start leaking again? I think I have gone far enough. If I have to start over, wouldn't I need a new valve since the olive (ferrule) is compromised? Or can I use the same valve and add Teflon tape? What do you think?

BTW, the leak is coming out from the back of the valve and the thread.
 
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Old 10-02-17, 04:01 PM
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After removing the old compression nut and ferrule, the pipe cannot have any depressions. If the pipe does have depressions, it needs cut back to clean, round pipe. The compression nut is not tightened 1/4 turn.

Tighten the nut using two wrenches until the ferrule just grabs the pipe, then tighten 1/2 turn and check for leaks.
It sounds like you didn't overtighten, so you probably just need to tighten a little more.
I would tighten 1/8 turn at a time and check for leaks, it's important it's not over tight.
 
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Old 10-02-17, 04:47 PM
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I am to turn it 1/4 turn after finger tightening but had to go past that rule.
That is a guide and not a rule. Sometimes it takes extra tightening to get the ferrule crimped correctly to the pipe.
 
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Old 10-03-17, 08:36 AM
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All, thanks for the advice.

Here's the thing. The previous home owner cut the copper pipe so there isn't much space between the valve and the wall. So I can't cut anymore. I can try tightening a little more and see if that stops. I did take the conservative approach and tighten a little at a time, hence the slow leak.

What would a plumber do if I needed a new copper pipe? Would he go back to the connection to the wall, remove and sweat a new pipe?
What are the other alternatives, short of hiring a plumber? Teflon? Putty?
 
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Old 10-03-17, 09:41 AM
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A plumber would solder a piece of pipe and a coupler on the stub.

You don't have many alternatives left now. You have the ferrule partially crimped on the pipe. That would have to be carefully cut off to change fittings.

Don't switch to a shark bite fitting because if it had a problem it could never be removed.
 
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Old 10-03-17, 01:31 PM
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I think you might be OK just tightening more. You started out finger tightening the compression nut and that's not possible, it will have no effect on compressing the ferrule. To me that means it's not tight enough.
If you know the pipe was already deformed before you started there are a few options:
- Remove the nut and ferrule using a puller and inspect the pipe. It might be useable after sanding with emery cloth.
- If you find the pipe does have too deep of a depression, you can sweat on a 1/2" copper to 1/2" pipe thread adapter and use a 1/2" NPT inlet valve. I've done that many times to avoid going into the wall.

Puller: https://www.appliancepartscompany.com/product/11216055

Copper adapter: 1/2 in. Copper C x M Male Pressure Adapter (10-Pack)-CP604HD12 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 10-04-17, 08:15 AM
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Just tighten it more. My rule of thumb, start out with the 1/4 turn and WHEN it still leaks, keep tightening it until it stops. I never had a compression connection not leak on the first tightening. Usually it leaks on the second and third but eventually the tightness stops it.
 
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