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Fixing a Bathroom Faucet leaking from underneath.


OptsyEagle's Avatar
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02-09-18, 11:01 AM   #1 (permalink)  
Fixing a Bathroom Faucet leaking from underneath.

So I have a small water leak on the hot water side of this faucet. Not sure who makes the faucet. The previous owner installed the sink. The leak was dripping water from the nut that connects the 3/8" copper riser to the faucet.

I thought I would attempt to change the washer but it looks like it used a washer that fits into the faucet stem itself. Would anyone know if these washers are replaceable or if you have another way of fixing this little leak.

I suppose I could change it all out to a flexible connector but was hoping for an easier fix. A washer is usually pretty easy. I haven't pulled on the washer that is there yet to see its condition but it does not look all that bad from my bad viewing angles.

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02-09-18, 11:58 AM   #2 (permalink)  
That looks like a compression ring on the supply pipe. They work by friction. The nut would need to go on tighter. You should scuff/clean all of the mating surfaces with a scotch Brite pad to get rid of any crud and try to tighten the nut again. It needs to be really tight.

If that fails, and you have a shutoff below, get a new braided supply line that is the right length or longer. Can't tell you exactly what to get without seeing the shutoff or the bottom of that supply line.

 
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02-09-18, 12:09 PM   #3 (permalink)  
Here is the supply line out from the wall. Sorry for the picture quality. It is a 1/2" copper pipe coming out of the wall. A 1/2' copper elbow soldered to it. The other side of the elbow has a 1/2" to 3/8" copper reducer soldered to it and on the other side of the reducer is a 3/8" copper riser going to the faucet. At the end of the riser has a cone shaped end to it. That piece gets pushed up into the faucet stem by a big female hex nut.

I tried tightening up the big hex nut before I took it apart to no avail. I could try sanding the cone part lightly and trying to tighten the nut some more and see if that fixes it.

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02-09-18, 12:29 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Yes. You could also buy some tfe paste (sold in tube or jars in the plumbing section) and use a little when you put it together. Can't hurt.

Replacing that line would be difficult if you have no plumbing experience.

 
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02-09-18, 12:57 PM   #5 (permalink)  
OK. So far, lightly sanding the cone parts outer surface and tightening it with a longer adjustable wrench for more leverage has stopped the leak for now.

I never trust plumbing. I always say plumbing needs to earn my trust first so I will keep a close eye on it and report back if it leaks again. If it does, I will probably replace the line with a flexible hose. I am not a torch guy so I will probably look for shartbite ball valve to connect the flexible line on. Not sure if I would want to connect to the 1/2" pipe coming out of the wall or the 3/8" copper riser. Not even sure if sharkbite bite offer a ball valve that bites onto a 3/8" copper pipe.

Anyway, if it doesn't leak I won't be doing any of it.

Thanks for your help.

 
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02-09-18, 01:05 PM   #6 (permalink)  
Yeah, if I was doing it I would yank the pipe out from the wall as far as possible and put a vise grips on it... then use a pipe tubing cutter to cut the 1/2" pipe. Then put on a chrome escutcheon and a 1/2" copper compression 90 degree quarter turn shutoff x 3/8 compression. That shutoff will accept a flexible faucet hookup.

 
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02-09-18, 02:03 PM   #7 (permalink)  
Before connecting up the flexible hose to the faucet would you remove the cylindrical washer that is inside the faucet's stem that the hose would screw onto? I noticed that this black cylindrical washer inside the faucet stem, that the cone part of the current copper riser compresses into seems to protrude below the metal faucet stem by a small amount, maybe 1/16". If it wasn't removed, the washer in the flexible connector would then be pushing a little onto the washer in the faucet stem.

Not sure if that would be a problem or not. I would assume the better seal would be the washer in the flexible hose to be pushed up directly against the metal part of the faucet's stem. I am also not sure if those cylindrical washer in my faucet's stem even pull out.

 
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02-09-18, 03:33 PM   #8 (permalink)  
Sounds about right. The flexible hoses have their own gaskets. You tighten them snug but do not overtighten them.

 
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