Disposal leaking out the bottom

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  #1  
Old 05-05-18, 06:58 PM
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Disposal leaking out the bottom

My mom's garbage disposal is leaking like a sieve. It's a 1/2 hp Kenmore, leaking most profusely from the marked holes.



I crawled in behind it to look for leaks from the fittings and they looked tight.

The funny thing was, I'd just used the disposal while running a bunch of water through it and didn't notice any leaking. Then I ran the dishwasher, which empties into the top of the disposal, and it ran water all over the kitchen floor.

Should I stick it with a fork?
 
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Old 05-05-18, 07:13 PM
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I'd be looking for a blocked drain line, most likely the drain trap area.
 
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Old 05-05-18, 10:02 PM
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I've never seen one leak out the bottom, even with a plugged drain and a full sink of water, unless the bottom seals were shot.

Since it's installed wrong (Romex supply without a clamp?! Huge shock hazard!) And it's coming up on Mothers Day...as Sean Connery said as he was dying on his living room floor in the Untouchables..."what are you prepared to do?!".
 
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Old 05-06-18, 12:37 PM
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Gunguy45:
...Since it's installed wrong (Romex supply without a clamp?! Huge shock hazard!) And it's coming up on Mothers Day...as Sean Connery said as he was dying on his living room floor in the Untouchables..."what are you prepared to do?!".
Please tutor me, oh Obi-Wan, so's I don't elocute myself. I didn't install this one but I probably will be on the hook for putting in the replacement, so what's this Rolex supply and what needs to happen different on the new install so's I don't let the smoke out (especially of myself)?

FWIW, just now I was going to put several inches of water in the sink and let it out all at once to watch what happened but the plug wasn't water-tight and it began running out of the bottom of the disposal before the standing water got even an inch deep.
 
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Old 05-06-18, 12:48 PM
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Disposals that leak pretty much need to be replaced. I have never heard of repairing one.

The dishwasher spout side has a knockout. You could remove the hose and double check that the knockout has actually been knocked out... or your dishwasher won't drain.
 
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Old 05-06-18, 02:14 PM
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If you verified with a paper towel or tissue that it's not leaking around the mounting flange of the disposer or the strainer of the sink...it's the seals.

They can be repaired, but it's not cost effective to do so when replacement is so much easier.

About the Romex...that's the generic term for the white wiring that is just stuck into the bottom of the unit and connected behind that plate that's held by a single screw just below the left most red circle. If it's hard wired you'll have to kill power to take that plate off and disconnect...unless it's really jury rigged with that wire attached to a plug or otherwise connected to an outlet under the sink.

I'm no expert, but if it's hardwired, I believe it needs to be a whip clamped to the bottom of the unit and run to a box in or on the wall, where it's also held by a clamp. If it is somehow hard wire connected to an outlet, it should be a regular power cord with a molded plug and needs the appropriate clamp added to that plate for the shape of the cord, either flat or round.

If it is REALLY rigged to the power somehow (like the Romex just sticking out of a hole in the wall), it's usually easier to add a box and outlet to the existing wiring and use a power cord. I've only seen liquid tight whips used in restaurants for big monster grinders.

Whips are pretty difficult to work with since they are relatively stiff and bulky for the limited access under a sink. Easy enough to use for A/C units and water heaters and such when you can use both hands and SEE what you are doing. Not easy for this application.
 
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Old 05-06-18, 02:32 PM
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TISSUE PAPER? You got me scared to walk into the room without my rubber Wellies on, and now you except me to TOUCH IT with tissue paper?


Just kidding. I ran some water, shut it off, then wiped all around. Bone dry.

I see a trip to Homies' Depot in my near future.

Thanks to all for your help!
 
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Old 05-06-18, 04:04 PM
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I KNEW you weren't from around here! They're "rubbers" (or galoshes) thank you very much. lol
 
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Old 05-06-18, 04:23 PM
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Gunguy45:
I KNEW you weren't from around here! They're "rubbers" (or galoshes) thank you very much. lol
Me? I'm a borned and bred hillbilly. I voted for Jeff Davis in the last election. Agin. I just started writing that way after I got a Monty Python tape stuck in my VCR.
 
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Old 05-06-18, 09:06 PM
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Lol................................
 
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Old 05-07-18, 07:24 AM
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Toilet paper is an excellent means of testing for leakage of minute amounts of water.

All sink disposers have the motor underneath with a shaft sticking upwards into the water chamber where the rotating grinder element is positioned. If you get leakage from under the disposer chances are the leak is where the shaft passes through where the necessary seal has failed.
 
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Old 05-21-18, 10:21 AM
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I managed to get the new disposal installed without seriously killing myself. I searched the forum here and based on advice I found I replaced it with an Insinkerator (non-Badger) Evolution model with 1/8th hp more than the original.



Sorry for the bad focus but I can't get an eye to the viewfinder from this angle. But as you can see, I made amends for the missing clamp (and added a new word to my vocabulibrary). The new disposal didn't come with one but I imposed on a friend who speaks fluent appliance repair and had a whole selection on hand.

Swapping disposals was the easy part. Adjusting the undersink plumbing to fit the dimensions of the new disposal was a pain because half of the old tubing and connectors couldn't stand the stress of relocation. I should have ripped it all out and replaced everything with new but I was under coinsiderable pressure from "the management" to get the job done, doors closed, and kitchen floor mopped.

Thanks once again for all your help!
 
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Old 05-21-18, 10:27 AM
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I like your choice of disposal and the electrical connections look soooo much better now, (though I really still don't know if having the romex exposed like that is ok or not).

And as you found, getting the plumbing side right is the biggest pain of the whole job.
 
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Old 05-22-18, 12:12 PM
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Now I'm confused again (probably my natural state). How do I unexpose the clamp?

I don't know if this is up to code but because the new disposal is so much taller than the old one, and its discharge tube so much lower, with the new disposal's tail piece hanging vertical, the sideways tube connecting it to the slip joint on the main drain tube would have had to run up-slope about 1.5". I was not eager for my Mom to be raising swap critters under he sink, so I knew that wouldn't cut it.



My solution was to turn the tail piece sideways so it aimed more or less directly at the slip joint (with the flexy piece to take some of the strain off of the joints), so there is no elbow connected to the tail piece hidden from view. Now the slope from the discharge tube to the slip joint is fairly uniform with no low spots. To have left the tail piece vertical would have required that I change the main drain tube for one with the slip joint located nearer the floor, and I was under too much pressure too wrap it up (so Mom could start cooking supper) to make another shopping trip to Homie's.

Would you recommend I go ahead and make that change preemptively (when time permits) or leave it to see if this falls apart?
 
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Old 05-22-18, 04:14 PM
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If it's not leaking and you have a good slope...I don't see a real issue for a temporary fix. The real plumbers here may take issue with something...and I DON'T like ever having to use flexible anything if can be avoided (and never EVER one of those crap corrugated looking things!), but hey, sometimes ya do what you gotta. Nothing requires the tube out of the disposal to be vertical...you just don't want it pointing upward and if you can get it to run downhill to the sink drain, you should do that. Every time I do something like this I buy a ton of pieces and parts to avoid a run back to the store...and then just return them later (or stick 'em in my plumbing parts box). So yes...I think you should re-pipe it as needed so it's all PVC slip fittings. When you have time.....

As to the electrical...the clamp is fine...way mo' betta than the Romex cable just hanging loose in the hole. I'll get one of the electrical guys to weigh in, but I just have a feeling exposed cable like that is a no no. It would probably be a relatively simple fix (you know, laying on your back, under the sink, trying to see what you're doing....easy!) to put an outlet on/in the wall and use a power cord.

Check back...I'll PM one of them later.
 
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Old 05-24-18, 02:15 PM
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Agree no flex. Solid tubing from GD should come into the drain level.

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So long as the NM-b (AKA Romex) isn't exposed to damage it is okay but I too would recommend a cord and receptacle.
 
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Old 05-24-18, 02:38 PM
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I didn't even see that that actual corrugated flex was used there! I thought it was some sort of poly tubing or something...at least from the original pic. Blown up, it's easy to see.


Thx for the ruling on the "NM-b" (I'll probably always call it Romex...just what my fingers know best".
 
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