How to safely repair fiberglass tub?

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Old 10-15-18, 09:22 PM
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How to safely repair fiberglass tub?

Hi everyone, thanks for your time. I have a tub thatís blistering quite a bit around the drain and Iíd like to seal it before it eventually leaks. Iím not sure if itís acrylic or fiberglass but itís a standard shower setup.

I first used JB Weld 8277 and it mostly worked but I can scratch it off with my fingernail, which is very disappointing.

I want to sand that down and try again and am looking for feedback on good repair kits, whether itís epoxy, fiberglass patch, or whatever you recommend.

One important factor is kids use the tub so my wife is worried about toxins. Thatís why I tried JB because it said safe for drinking water. Other solutions Iíve looked at seem very toxic.

Should I try 50172 instead, or try Rust-Oleum Tub and Tile repair kit? Both have pretty mixed reviews and I canít find a lot of data on their safety once dry.
 
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Old 10-16-18, 12:14 AM
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It's a bath tub or a shower stall ?

Most, if not all, glues and epoxies are fairly non toxic after drying.
Unless the kids are licking it..... it should be safe.
 
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Old 10-16-18, 05:10 AM
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You really need to find out what the tub or shower is made of. Some cheap units are plastic and there is very little that will stick. Fiberglass units are much more repairable but you need to sand through the jellcoat layer to get better bonding with the structural fiberglass underneath. But, I would use a fiberglass resin for repair and not a epoxy putty. Putty contains a lot of filler so there isn't as much resin for bonding or strength.
 
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Old 10-16-18, 09:31 AM
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Can you post a picture so we can see what your seeing?
Blistering makes me think it's likely fiberglass and moisture is causing it to delaminate.
JB Weld is good stuff, but not for this job and going to make it much harder to fix right.
https://www.westsystem.com/handy-repair-pack/
 
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Old 10-16-18, 05:56 PM
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Thanks everyone. From what you described, I definitely think itís fiberglass and itís a full shower/bath combo (not sure the correct name but itís a tub and full surround all one piece).

Any particular reason the west systems product would work better than JB?

Iíve been looking at the fiberglass patches for sale elsewhere but have no experience with that. I donít care about looks, only want to stop the blistering permanently and also make sure Iím not using something thatíll leech toxins into the tub.

Iíll try to get pics soon.
 
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Old 10-17-18, 05:16 AM
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West System is a high quality resin, probably the best. It's certainly one of the best short of paying crazy for aerospace grade. It's an epoxy system which makes it compatible with more materials and it's all resin without the fillers used in other resin systems. One thing to note about West System epoxies is that they cure more slowly than DIY products sold in auto parts stores and home centers. I normally use #205 fast hardener. Even with it it is a slow cure that allows more than enough pot and working time.

If you've never worked with epoxy or polyester resins... read the instructions. Then be mindful that when resin cures it makes heat... heat makes it cure faster... which causes it to make more heat. Basically, the resin will cure much faster in the pot. This affect is minimized by only mixing the small amount you need. Don't hold the pot in the palm of your hand which can warm it. If the pot starts to get hot or the resin starts to jelly toss it and start over.
 
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Old 10-17-18, 05:53 AM
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A few things to add, the first one being a guess because we have no picture.
Your saying it's around the drain that the issue, if that's the case I'd be removing the drain, sanding that area to get rid of any high spots, vac up the dust, drying the area with a hair dryer before the epoxy.
When using the epoxy wear gloves!
Clean up any drips ASAP with Lacquer Thinner, Acetone, or Alcohol, once this stuff hardens up it's hard as a rock.
For a small batch like you need I'd be just mixing it on top of a piece of cardboard, whatever's left over let completly dry before tossing in the trash.
 
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