Jacuzzi fill spout

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  #1  
Old 04-21-19, 10:33 AM
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Jacuzzi fill spout

When my grandchildren come to visit they love to take a bubble bath in the Jacuzzi tub. And their Mom loves that they come home clean. Yesterday that event resulted in a leak through the ceiling below.

Upon investigation I found that the side mounted fill spout had broken.

Problem #1: Where to find a replacement. This part no. 5128000 or 2449000 is listed as discontinued on the several parts sites I searched.

Problem #2: How to remove the threaded portion from the front (inside). The ID is 11/16 in. Is there some sort of spud wrench or extractor in that size that I could use?. A reverse threaded bolt might work if I could find one that size. There is access through a hatch that I made through the outside wall but I'm not sure I could get a wrench on the fitting through it.

Problem #3: If I cannot find a replacement part, I would consider a deck mounted spout. Any suggestions for spout only or valve/spout combination? Ideas for sealing up the existing hole?

The existing valves work OK but considering their age and a problem I had several years ago (hence the hatch) I might consider replacing them too (with a valve/spout assembly). The existing valves are on 3 inch centers.

There is space on the deck to the right and I have access to pipes through a cabinet on the right end. There is also deck mounted hand shower with its own tempering valve mounted on a small countertop at the right end.

Your help and suggestions are appreciated.

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Last edited by PJmax; 05-06-19 at 11:23 AM. Reason: resized pictures
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  #2  
Old 04-21-19, 05:01 PM
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I hate to say it but that's the sort of thing I would go ahead and make. It's a relatively simple part. The complexity comes with what appearance you want. At it's most crude you could make up something with common plumbing fittings. It would work but not be very attractive. If you know an old machinist or someone who enjoys metal working they could fabricate something pretty.

I think part of the problem is the rigid piping connecting to the plastic fill spout. It likely was under some amount of strain and eventually age and vibration caused the plastic to break. You might be able to clean the plastic parts and epoxy them together. Then use flexible tubing to connect to copper so the plastic is not under strain.
 
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Old 08-06-19, 12:47 PM
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Progress report and questions

The photo below shows the parts so far.

I have epoxied the broken bits back together. In addition to the main break between the housing and the threaded fitting there were also three breaks in the 3/4 inch pipe thread area where the original metal elbow connected.

It took three attempts to finally get those pieces to bond adequately. (In addition to the small surface area I think the first failed due to a bad epoxy mix. The second may not have had enough of the original bad mix removed.) I scraped and sanded all the pieces to base plastic before the third try and it seems to have bonded.

Even so I don't want to rely on the epoxy bond only so I will insert and epoxy in a piece of metal pipe through the threaded area. The I.D is 11/16. The plumbing supply house had a brass nipple with that outside dimension and an inside dimension of 3/8 inch. However a chrome finishing tube for 1/2 inch PEX would also be 11/16 O.D. with a thinner wall and 5/8 inch I.D. https://www.supplyhouse.com/Wirsbo-U...SABEgL3APD_BwE Since this is a non-pressure situation would there be enough difference in flow between 3/8 and 5/8 to matter?

The metal pipe will also provide a clamped connection point for the 5/8 inch I.D plastic tubing. Should I bother also looking for a 3/4 inch threaded connection between the plastic tubing (7/8 inch O.D.) and the spout? (Too much "belt and suspenders"?)

The photo also shows a short piece of 1/2 inch copper tube that can be clamped inside the plastic and used to make connection to the existing 3/4 inch copper supply--either via a soldered reducer or a Sharkbite. Any thoughts?

What about using silicone sealant inside the clamped connections, too?

Due to age, moisture and pressure the original fiber washer that backs up the rubber washer is deformed and I prefer not to reuse it. I have cut a new one the same size from a piece of Formica.

Being really paranoid about a possible future failure I am considering the following for mounting the spout:

1. Silicone sealant between the spout housing and the tub surface
2. The rubber washer (more sealant?)
3. The Formica washer
4. The locking nut
5. Some means of securing the threaded portion of the spout to the BACK of the tub so it will not pull away if it separates from the housing again.

The large Formica washer (mounted after the locking nut) could be used for that but would have a gap between it and the tub due to the thickness of the washers and locking nut. I am thinking of making something that would have a recess to accommodate the locking nut, be larger than the small washer diameter, and would be attached to the tub with silicone sealant, thus "compressing" the threaded fitting against the back of the tub. I have some 1/2 inch thick Corian that I could use to make such a fitting. Any thoughts on that?
 
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Last edited by 2john02458; 08-06-19 at 12:51 PM. Reason: Can't see "Attached image". It showed up in Preview. Is is there?
  #4  
Old 08-08-19, 11:51 AM
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Bump.............anybody?
 
  #5  
Old 09-09-19, 10:01 AM
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Final result

Original plastic housing repaired with epoxy and silicone sealed to tub wall.

Washers and locking nut on fitting.

Custom Corian backer silicone sealed to back of tub wall over the washers and locking nut.

11/16" copper tube silicone sealed inside plastic housing and flexible clear tubing to strengthen the repaired fitting. Dishwasher/disposer rubber fitting clamped to plastic fitting and clear tubing.

Dishwasher/disposer rubber fitting clamped to 3/4" copper pipe and 7/8" O.D. clear tubing after silicone sealing. (Let silicone cure before clamping to prevent pipe/tubing from slipping out.)

The long radius of the bend required gouging out some of the foam insulation in the hatch cover to prevent putting external pressure against the tubing and strain on the repaired plastic fitting. Not a freezing problem since the R value of the foam is much higher than the fiberglass in the adjacent wall and no water remains in the tubing when it is shut off.
 
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Old 09-09-19, 11:52 AM
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Looks like it should be a very effective repair. Name:  thumb.jpg
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Old 09-09-19, 06:36 PM
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I love seeing people get creative to solve an unusual problem. Good job!
 
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