50s toilet fill replacement issue

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Old 11-17-19, 05:57 PM
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50s toilet fill replacement issue

i cant win. i'm used to replacing this flapper once a year when it starts to leak but after replacing it a month ago, i had high water usage. so what i did was keep adjusting it , figuring it was out of place. i tied up the fill float so not to waste much water during the testing. seems like no matter what, it leaked. bought another new one yesterday and finally found a spot where it didnt leak.

BUT now i apparently have a fill issue. it wont stop running. its slow thankfully but now it overflows into the pipe an of course wasting water. turning off the water isnt an option. that valve would break if i touched it. happened when i did the other toilet years ago in the other bathroom.

i really really dread trying to replace the fill tube as its a 1952 toilet. you know when you start playing with those pipes things are gonna go wrong. im not ready yet for a replacement due to things i wont bore you with now.

but just wondering will todays modern fill tubes still work with this or is there something maybe i could do to the existing one to fix it. i just dont get it. why would it not be leaking before today. i had the float tied up and the water level never went up when i was testing.
 
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Old 11-17-19, 07:10 PM
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There is a height adjustment for the float, which might be a small metal squeeze clip the slides up and down a thin rod that runs from the side of the float down to a linkage underneath.. This can let the float shut off the water before rising so high and before letting the water overflow.

You can buy a new float and fill assembly similar to the one pictured, to replace the broken one in the other toilet. You can get it with or without a flapper and hinge and overflow tube assembly if you need or don't need one of the latter.
 
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Old 11-18-19, 03:57 AM
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no thats the thing. i moved the float down and it still overfills. so frustrating. but ill adjust it again and maybe get lucky
 
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Old 11-18-19, 05:45 PM
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Tonight I came home and the float was totally under water. I flushed it and so far it appears to be holding level but I do not think it will. As you can see from the picture this stuff is old. And I am not a plumbing expert. But when I did the other toilet what happened is the pipe that under the house started to twist and I was not aware of it. There is no access under the house for me to get there because of the size of the window to the crawl .

So what I had to do is drill a larger hole in the floor and reach down and use a SharkBite to attach a new pipe to upstairs. So I worry if I start playing around with this pipe that I am going to have another issue. I do not want to touch the valve in any way whatsoever but if I could cut the tube and do something there I would consider it. But I also believe that just playing with this is going to be a big issue.
 
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Old 11-18-19, 06:22 PM
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Galvinzed pipe coming through the floor can be an issue. The supply above the valve can and should be replaced.

Instead of touching the valve turn off the water to the street.

Any fill valve will fit. Get one from the home store.

with a flex supply line.

But in my professional experience just replace the toilet. That copper tube flush valve is prone to leaking corrosion.

Looks like it was old american standard toilet with old black disk flapper converted to slide on flapper..

Not good IMO.

I vote replace toilet.

If you insist on fixing rebuilding and your skill set just isnt up to par , yes you can get into trouble there.

Sometimes calling a pro is best.

New toilets are higher and more comfortable and have a 3" flapper in most designs for supperior flushing. And fully glazed trapways..
 
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Old 11-19-19, 05:49 AM
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I agree with Lawrosa to replace the toilet, but you say you can't do that for reason unsaid. If you can afford about $15 bucks I would suggest this fill valve



This has no float to deal with (I've installed many of these with great success. Will never go back to the float type) and If I recall, it's preset for the older larger tanks, but can be adjusted for any size tank. You will still need to shut off main water supply, and that will be a good time to replace the supply valve for the toilet.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 07:06 AM
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I do not know why you do not want to touch the supply valve.

Repairing or replacing the toilet will force you to do this.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 06:42 PM
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I wouldn't spend anything at all on a 1950s toilet. It's probably a 5 gallon flush toilet anyway and your water bill must be a killer. I'd replace it with a new 1.28 gallon flush toilet. I kind of like the American Standard elongated comfort height (same as ADA height) toilets. Most have a 3" flush valve and a few have a 4" flush valve.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 12:21 AM
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Replace the toilet and the new one will pay for itself in short order in reduced water consumption.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 05:31 AM
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Guys, remember from the OP's first post.

im not ready yet for a replacement due to things i wont bore you with now.
He is unable to replace toilet for whatever reason, so our job is to advise him the next best alternative. But I agree the toilet should be replaced.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 07:55 PM
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Om second thought the washer or seal inside the float must be worn out although hopefully the flow at least slows down when the float reaches the top of the shaft.

It would be a lot easier to buy a new fill float assembly as opposed to dissecting and repairing the existing float for which you don't know whether replacement washers or other parts are even available any more..
 
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