Basement stationary tub install

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Old 01-12-20, 01:34 PM
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Basement stationary tub install

Here's a picture of my son's basement where washing machine is located. He wants to put in a stationary sink to provide a washing machine drain reservoir and a place to wash up and clean things. Since the drain tile is about 24" to 30" high, what is the best method to plumb the drain? Is a pump the only alternative? In my house the drain tile is below where any sink would be placed. I never had to work with a drain tile higher than a sink drain would be.

 
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Old 01-12-20, 02:35 PM
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Water only flows down hill, not much different from the houses we had with laundry in the basement and septic systems with lines running along the ceiling.

The sink had a pump to get the water up to the main drain line!

I suppose you could build a platform high enough to install the sink so that the drain would be above the line!
 
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Old 01-12-20, 02:43 PM
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I suppose you could build a platform high enough to install the sink so that the drain would be above the line!


That's what my son said. But that would be pretty high. We'd have to build a whole platform to put the washer, dryer and sink, along with enough room to stand on. Then the ceiling height might be tight for a tall person.
Me thinks a pump might be the better solution. Never installed a pump drain before. Any tricks or cautions to know about?
 
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Old 01-12-20, 03:14 PM
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We'd have to build a whole platform to put the washer, dryer and sink
Just the sink, the washer will pump into the sink, everything else can stay were it's at! Odd yes!

The sink pumps are prone to clogging up with washer lint so get strainers on the washer discharge to keep it clean!
 
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Old 01-12-20, 03:25 PM
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For the washer discharge not a problem. But for using the sink to clean things, the lip of the sink could be near chest height and in this case (the fair haired boy and his spouse) is about 5'-6". Not very comfortable user height.

Yes, lint filters are always a good thing.

So do these drain pumps require any special hook up other than electricity? Do they have an auto sensing switch that will pump out or does the sink need to have a certain head or column before it empties? Is there a manual switch also?
 
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Old 01-12-20, 03:31 PM
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The standpipe appears to be 1 1/2" PVC, is that right? Why is there a valve in the washer drain line?
 
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Old 01-12-20, 03:37 PM
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So a little bit of GOOGLING and I learned that the proper name for these are "remote sink drain systems". They cost between $200 and $400. Various brands are Zoeller and Liberty. I believe those are quality brand names. It looks like they use an enclosed bin that the drain water goes into and the float will be actuated from within the sealed box or bin. What about using such things as paint thinner and other typical chemicals that might be used in a stationary sink to clean things? I know in my basement sink I don't think twice about cleaning paint brushes, or any object using sometimes caustic chemicals. Of course I would not throw gasoline or anything like that, but various harsh soaps and cleaners are used quite often. Can those sump pumps take the abuse?
 
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Old 01-12-20, 04:40 PM
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The standpipe appears to be 1 1/2" PVC, is that right? Why is there a valve in the washer drain line?
Apparently this seems to be a common among many newer homes. It came with the house. I think it's to prevent back flow in case of outside flooding.
 
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Old 01-14-20, 07:23 PM
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Washer standpipes need to be 2"minimum. I cannot tell, but the next time you are there, take a look and see if the standpipe is 1 1/2" or 2".
 
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Old 01-15-20, 05:10 AM
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Joe, you are correct it's 2". But that's rather a new code (perhaps the last 20 years) Mine and most of my neighborhood is 1 1/2.
 
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Old 01-15-20, 05:22 PM
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As far as I know, the minimum standpipe size has always been 2", but I am no plumbing expert. I don't think I have ever seen a 1 1/2" washer standpipe anywhere. Mike would know.
 
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