Downstairs toilet takes multiple flushes to get it all down.

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Old 10-08-20, 08:26 AM
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Downstairs toilet takes multiple flushes to get it all down.

At this point I have cleared all the holes around the rim, adjusted and checked the flush mechanism, but not replaced it yet. I will occasionally get somewhat of a swirl and sometimes all the water empties the bowl. But more often than not it doesn't. I have tried plunging it, but there's no change.

So I got thinking about it today and went down and looked at the pipe in the basement. When we renovated this house the only weak point seemed to be but plumber that the contractor hired. For some reason he seemed to be adverse to putting any kind of a slope in drain pipes. I had another issue with the drain pipe from our laundry room, which was solved by chipping away some of the foundation enabling the pipe to have some slope. It appears that this is a similar situation in that when I put a level on the straight pipe coming out of the first elbow I'm getting a bit of a negative slope. I don't know if this matters as much with a toilet drain.

My question is what would be the best way for me to put a bit of a slope in that straight pipe? I'm thinking that the elbow on the left that drops into the main drain pipe is coupled to the y fitting with a small section of straight pipe. Could I cut it at the middle of the straight pipe and remove some of it. Then glue it together with a coupling? of course I would also have to lower the hangers to get the slope. It's in a very awkward place to work on so I wanted to see if I was on the right track.

More/larger pictures of situation





 

Last edited by PJmax; 10-08-20 at 01:02 PM. Reason: added pics from link
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Old 10-08-20, 09:06 AM
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Before changing piping configurations I would be looking at the toilet itself starting at the trap. A partial blockage in the trap will give you the sort of problem you are describing. A plunger may, or may not clear the blockage. Buy a toilet auger (cheap at any Big Box) and make sure that the trap is clear.

How bad is the negative drain slope? Is there a cleanout? Pictures would help.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 09:25 AM
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Thanks. Duh, forgot to add the pics. I edited the original post and put a link in.

Where is the trap? I don't see one, at least like I'm used to (sink trap).
 
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Old 10-08-20, 09:41 AM
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The trap is inside the toilet.

 
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Old 10-08-20, 10:58 AM
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If the toilet's drain line doesn't have proper fall/slope I would address that first, especially since you have access to everything. Toilets don't flush well when there is any back pressure plus it's just plain wrong to not have fall in a drain line.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 11:28 AM
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After looking at the pictures, do you agree with my methodology of creating a bit of a slope?
 
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Old 10-08-20, 01:03 PM
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I added some pictures from your link.
It looks like the strap (red arrow) needs to be let down and the pipe needs to be cut at the blue arrow.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 01:06 PM
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Where's Where's Where's Where's the pictures?
 
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Old 10-08-20, 01:14 PM
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Where's Where's Where's Where's the pictures?
Ummmm.... how about post #1.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 02:22 PM
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I don't know whether or not a coupling will fit in that area after you shorten the pipe. From the photos my guess would be no but you'll just have to measure and see.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 02:42 PM
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If I have the blue arrow in the correct location..... you'll need to break the pipe out of the current fittings and shorten that nipple to almost nothing. Looks to be about 4" now.
 
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Old 10-09-20, 06:34 AM
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Where's the vent located?????
 
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Old 10-09-20, 11:35 AM
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Shouldn't there be a clean out on that drain? Not that I would want to open it if the drain is pitched wrong.

If it were me I would plan on replacing the elbow, probably with a street elbow and adding a coupling in the horizontal run to make sure the elbow lines up with the vertical nipple. That way you can cut the vertical piece to whatever length you need to get the correct pitch.
 
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Old 10-09-20, 02:48 PM
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Hi, put a level on the pipe and check for pitch, sometimes looks can be deceiving.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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