Help With Best Way To Install Push Fit Shut Off Valve

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Old 01-11-21, 06:35 AM
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Help With Best Way To Install Push Fit Shut Off Valve

I need to replace shut off valves under my 2 bathroom sinks. The space under each small about 11 inches from side to side. I'm thinking the SharkBite push fitting would be the best option because it would be incredibly tough to get a crimp or cinch tool in there and get enough leverage to squeeze and get the angle right.. The challenge with installing the push fit valves is that there isn't a good way to get enough leverage to push the fittings onto the pex pipe without pushing the pipes back into the wall. I'm thinking about maybe putting a worm gear type hose clamp on the pex right up against that metal piece where the pex goes into the wall. That way when I push the sharkbite onto the pipe, the clamp will press against that metal piece at the wall and hopefully prevent the pex pipe from pushing into the wall. Any feedback on this idea or any alternate ideas would be greatly appreciated.

 
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Old 01-11-21, 09:35 AM
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So you are saying those valves are crimped directly onto the PEX ?
That means your current valve looks like the picture.

 
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Old 01-11-21, 10:35 AM
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Why are you replacing the valves?
 
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Old 01-11-21, 10:54 AM
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I had a similar situation a while back. I had some paracord with me so I tied a prussic knot around the pipe. Then I used a screwdriver to push the knot as far back into the wall as it would go. I pulled on the cord to make sure the knot had a grip on the pipe and I kept tension on it. Cut the old shutoff valve off the end and installed the new valve.

So, be creative and work with whatever you have on hand to keep the pipe from popping back into the wall. Make sure you have the pipe grabbed before you cut the valve off as I've had them "pop" and spring back into the wall.
 
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Old 01-11-21, 11:29 AM
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The faucet wasn't working right, so I removed the cartridge and turned on the valve and pieces of the o ring came out.
 
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Old 01-11-21, 11:54 AM
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Would it be better off crimping on a male fitting so that it's easier to change the valve in the future ?
 
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Old 01-11-21, 12:06 PM
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Yes, it does look like a barbed valve like that
 
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Old 01-11-21, 01:14 PM
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That knot was an excellent idea. I tested it out and you can get a very good grip on the pipe. Thank you for the help.
 
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Old 01-11-21, 03:20 PM
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If the old valve passes water and the stem doesn't leak, you can remove the flex pipe (after closing water supply), attach a 1/4 turn valve (Keeney Mfg. #380734) to the vacated thread and reattach the flex pipe to the new valve. Leave the old valve full open.
 
 

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