Anyone with experience pulling a really stuck faucet knob like this?

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  #1  
Old 02-22-21, 09:41 PM
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Anyone with experience pulling a really stuck faucet knob like this?

Kohler brand Kitchen faucet I believe is original (top picture), house was built in 1980.

Hot water has been dripping. Pry off the small cap at top of the knob, removed one Philips screw from inside, there is no set screw on the side.

Bought a faucet handle puller from Home Depot (bottom picture) , tried it but the knob wouldn't budge.

Anyone has experience removing a knob of this kind and age in order to get to the stem piece? If so please advise. Thank you.




 

Last edited by PJmax; 02-22-21 at 09:54 PM. Reason: resized pics
  #2  
Old 02-22-21, 09:50 PM
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When you used that handle puller..... was a little bit of the small pin still showing ?
If not.... the threaded part hits the top of the knob and won't act like a puller.
That pin needs to hit the bottom of the valve shaft to work properly.

The puller I use is a little different. You loosen the screw and the puller pushes off that.
Sometimes I'll put a longer screw in the handle to push off of.

Some PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench or any type of rust eater down the screw hole can help.
 
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Old 02-26-21, 04:11 PM
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Thanks Pete.

Like your description, when my puller is inserted, the pin part is still clearly visible about 1/2" long.
Attached 2 pictures for that.

Could you share a link of the type of puller you used?


 
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Old 02-26-21, 04:20 PM
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Try soaking the stem area with Lime-A-Way or CLR. Worse case scenario is to cut it off and buy new handles.
 
  #5  
Old 02-26-21, 04:25 PM
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You have a 40 year old faucet. Repairing is usually a good first option, but there comes a time when replacing might be a better option.
 
 

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