Kitchen flooded after dishwasher hose ruptured


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Old 09-04-22, 03:16 PM
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Kitchen flooded after dishwasher hose ruptured

Last night one of the hoses on my dishwasher burst and I had to mop up a mess on the kitchen floor. It's the hose that transports water from the dishwasher inlet valve to the spray arm. I am going to cap off the angle stop valve outlet to the dishwasher. I'm not going to use the dishwasher anymore. But I still want the dishwasher to be in full working order for when I sell the house one day. A couple important questions.

1. I have a 3/8 inch threaded cap for the angle stop valve outlet. Do I use teflon on the angle stop threads.......rubber washer/O-Ring to prevent leaks.....or nothing? Which is better?

2. That hose that needs to be replaced in the photo is push-on type. Can I cut the threaded fittings
off a reinforced internally braided hose and just clamp it on?

 

Last edited by PJmax; 09-04-22 at 04:38 PM. Reason: resized pic
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Old 09-04-22, 04:41 PM
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That's the hose that delivers water from the valve to the tub.... not the spray arm.
It's fairly low pressure and water only passes thru it during fill.
Any hose would pretty much be ok.

One problem with dishwashers is that the seals will dry up and harden if not used at least
monthly..... so disconnecting the machine may have a detrimental long term effect.
 
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Old 09-04-22, 06:07 PM
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Hi Pete,

I replaced all the dishwasher plumbing myself back in 2015 to prevent this type of thing from happening. I was told the same thing back then......that I could pretty much use any hose.

Why did it burst then? It made a loud sound popping sound, which I didn't figure out till I saw the water on the floor an hour later.

As far as the pump seal seizing up, all I need to do is pour water in the tub regularly to keep it lubricated. It's a very old dishwasher anyway and I don't really trust anything you can't easily
check for leaks, like simply opening a bathroom cabinet door.

Do I need to put anything on that threaded cap to prevent leaking?

And can I just cut the fittings of a reinforced, braided hose to clamp on a new one........or maybe even PEX?
 
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Old 09-10-22, 02:21 PM
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I screwed on a compression cap with a 17/32 inch rubber washer. I hand tightened, then 1/2 turn with a wrench. No leaks. I might give it another 1/4 turn.
I'm emailing with GE support.They should tell me next week what hose replacement to use. I won't be using this dishwasher again. But I still want it to be in full working order if I sell the house.
 
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Old 09-10-22, 02:25 PM
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They'll give you a GE replacement part number.
What is the model number ?

You replaced the hoses in 2015.... with what ?
Factory parts or your own replacements ?

I have never replaced that hose before.
There's no pressure on that line.
 
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Old 09-23-22, 03:46 PM
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Back in 2015 I replaced that hose with something I found at a home brewer's supply store because no one, including GE, could tell me what I needed to use.

I provided GE with the model and serial number like before. They were of no help at all even though they did give me a replacement hose part number with an insane price. There was a image of the hose. But they could tell me nothing about the hose. I ended up using clear braided PVC tubing. It's supposed to be ok for potable water. And it seems really strong.

I have permanently decommissioned the dishwasher. I'm done with it for good. But it is still operational if the house if sold in the future. I pour water in the tub regularly to keep the pump seal lubricated.
 
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Old 09-25-22, 07:12 AM
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6 years ago I moved out of a condo I had for sale into a new house I had bought and it took 8 months to sell the condo and complete closing, etc where the condo was not lived in. Since the 28 year old dishwasher, which worked perfectly everyday for us for the 15 years we lived there, was part of the sale, as were other appliances, my wife and I decided to test them all before closing since I want to be sure they are in working order when the new owners move in. If they tell me there is a problem I want to be sure there was a problem when I left it, not something that the new owner did or is making up.

Anyway, the dishwasher leaked. The new owner and I agreed to a $300 reduced selling price to meet my obligations in the sale, with respect to an offered working dishwasher. Just saying that not using the dishwasher is not a guaranteed solution that you won't have dishwasher problems when you go to sell the property. If anything, it increases the chances of one.
 
 

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