Improving water line connection to refrigerator


  #1  
Old 03-15-23, 11:52 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 56
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question Improving water line connection to refrigerator

Fridge has a copper water line that uses a crummy saddle valve under the sink. I'd like to replace with a better solution, though I'm a bit puzzled by the collection of fittings I see already in place. See pics, I'm thinking maybe a previous dishwasher was hooked up to cold and the pex line was capped off? I know this kitchen had a flood at one time (water damage on cabinets), so this may have been part of the fix.

Should I cut the copper pipe at the saddle valve and discard the parts below? Since the pipe below the T isn't being used for anything but the fridge, what kind of fitting would I want for the line to the fridge? I can replace the fridge water line as well if there's a better product.



Above

Below



 
  #2  
Old 03-15-23, 11:54 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 56
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
80s quality picture, let me try that again!


Above

 
  #3  
Old 03-15-23, 12:18 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,509
Received 2,110 Upvotes on 1,889 Posts
I would turn off the water and open a faucet to bleed the pressure out of the system. Then I'd unsolder and remove everything coming out the bottom of the "T". Then you can solder on a new section of pipe with a shutoff valve for the fridge water line.
 
greystone_way voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 03-15-23, 02:50 PM
Z
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,361
Received 120 Upvotes on 111 Posts


I know soldering is the tried and true best, but I think if you don’t know how to solder you could use a SharkBite valve as in the link. It pushes on like the orange handled SharkBite valve in your picture.

I think that should work. You would have to make a nice square cut. You can get a cheap copper tubing cutter in Home Depot and they work well and it will be easy to make square cut. Then you would clean the pipe good with sandpaper and then maybe emery cloth and get it nice and shiny clean. Then you can just push on the new valve.

Brushed Nickel Angle Stop Valve | SharkBite
 
greystone_way voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 03-15-23, 03:05 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 56
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for both answers, I was a bit concerned I didn't have enough pipe below the T for a Sharkbite. I've done copper pipe soldering for air lines in the garage, this is a really tight spot with the dishwasher and disposal so I'll give the Sharkbite approach a try.

The angle stop valve looks perfect.
 
  #6  
Old 03-15-23, 03:16 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 64,639
Received 3,892 Upvotes on 3,489 Posts
No need to cut above the saddle tee. The saddle only punctures a hole in the center.
Turn the water off. Remove the saddle valve and cut the pipe just above the puncture.
Sand the pipe and deburr well.
You'll have plenty of pipe for a sharkbite fitting.
You may not be able to remove that fitting in the future due to its close proximity to the tee.
 
greystone_way voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 03-15-23, 03:17 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 56
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Got it, makes sense. Just need to get limbered up and get in there.
 
  #8  
Old 03-15-23, 03:20 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 64,639
Received 3,892 Upvotes on 3,489 Posts
Heck.... that's easy. Wait until you have to work on the faucet.
 
  #9  
Old 03-17-23, 05:25 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 56
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
So the install went pretty well, had just enough pipe to get the Sharkbite on the required 15/16". I recut the brass water line and used the new compression sleeve but am getting a very slow leak (one or two drips an hour). It's as tight as I dare go, can I take it apart and reseat the sleeve or do I need to get a new one? Any other tips for avoiding a dribble?

Thanks

 
  #10  
Old 03-18-23, 08:26 AM
2
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA near Boston, MA
Posts: 2,245
Received 387 Upvotes on 337 Posts
Watch it for a couple of days. The drip may stop. If not you should try to tighten it a bit more. Did you use two wrenches. You need to hold the valve body with one and use the other on the nut. Use opposite pressure on the wrenches to tighten.
 
  #11  
Old 03-18-23, 12:46 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 64,639
Received 3,892 Upvotes on 3,489 Posts
You could unscrew the nut and add a small bit of joint compound to the threads.
It will act as a sealant and a lubricant.
You need to go pretty tight to seal the compression ring.

In the end if all else fails.... pick up a nut and compression ring and do it again.
Sometimes there is a tiny groove in the pipe that the ring just won't seal to.
 
  #12  
Old 03-18-23, 12:54 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 56
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for input, sure enough a day later it's bone dry and happy. I'll keep an eye on it and I have a smart water sensor under the sink.
 
  #13  
Old 09-04-23, 12:48 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 65
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
saddle valve shut off

Can I use the saddle valve to shut off water to ice maker{leaks]Afraid tu use shut off ahead of it -not used for 30 yrs?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: