Dying Slipcover


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Old 05-21-21, 11:37 AM
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Dying Slipcover

I have no experience dying large volume projects so I'm hoping someone here does. I have 2 sofa slipcovers both are 100% cotton and both have faded from sun exposure. I want to try dying the older of the two as a trial run for doing the newer slipcover. I'm unaware of any fabric dye brand other than *** (commonly available fabric dye sold in grocery stores etc.), is there anything else out there I should look for? The Slipcovers have 6 cushion covers plus the large arm/skirt/back portion. Between my Sister and I we figured a couple of large Plastic Storage Totes - out in the yard would be the most practical - the slipcovers are a deep brick red which is the color I'd like to get as close to that as I can.

Any advice anyone who has been successful (or failed) at this type of project would be very welcome. Thank you so much!
 
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Old 05-21-21, 01:01 PM
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Isn't it amazing.... the second we hear fabric dye we think of RIT. It really is a household name. My mother and her mother used it all the time. I can remember the leaky boxes on the washer or running down the side.

I sure Shadeladie can offer some help when she comes on later this evening.
 
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Old 05-21-21, 01:13 PM
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This article describes the different types of dyes and the brands. It's something I started researching last week as I want to do some tie dye this summer. Rit is a very common universal dye but the colors aren't as vibrant or colorfast as some other processes but as usual it often comes down to how much work you want to put into the project. I think I'll use Procion MX for my tie dye project. It's a bit more complex but the extra steps don't bother me.
 
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Old 05-21-21, 01:44 PM
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I would actually recommend you have this done professionally, if you really want to dye it. iDye for natural fabrics, is a better choice than RIT, but neither is really the best choice. First of all, a slipcover is too big to dye in a washer or totes, so you'll never get it uniform. You'll have lighter and darker spots or streaks. Neither is totally dyefast. Even adding the vinegar, the color is going to rub off on whomever is sitting on it. Everything and all your clothes will be turning red eventually.
 
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Old 05-21-21, 02:15 PM
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Having it done professionally was my first choice, but I've been unsuccessful trying to find one in my area. I've spoken to my Dry Cleaner, hoping he might have a contact but no joy. I guess the search continues.
 
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Old 05-21-21, 02:29 PM
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PD, look into Jacquard SolarFast. Just spray, brush or sponge it on, put it in the sun, and it's done.
 
 

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